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  1.  22
    Collective Fear, Individualized Risk: The Social and Cultural Context of Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer.N. Press, J. R. Fishman & B. A. Koenig - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (3):237-249.
    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical examination of two aspects of culture and biomedicine that have helped to shape the meaning and practice of genetic testing for breast cancer. These are: (1) the cultural construction of fear of breast cancer, which has been fuelled in part by (2) the predominance of a ‘risk’ paradigm in contemporary biomedicine. The increasing elaboration and delineation of risk factors and risk numbers are in part intended to help women to contend (...)
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    Collective Fear, Individualized Risk: The Social and Cultural Context of Genetic Testing Forbreast Cancer.N. Press, J. R. Fishman & B. A. Koenig - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (3):237-249.
    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical examination of two aspects of culture and biomedicine that have helped to shape the meaning and practice of genetic testing for breast cancer. These are: the cultural construction of fear of breast cancer, which has been fuelled in part by the predominance of a ‘risk’ paradigm in contemporary biomedicine. The increasing elaboration and delineation of risk factors and risk numbers are in part intended to help women to contend with their (...)
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    Informed Consent in a Multicultural Cancer Patient Population: Implications for Nursing Practice.D. M. Barnes, A. J. Davis, T. Moran, C. J. Portillo & B. A. Koenig - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (5):412-423.
    Obtaining informed consent, an ethical obligation of nurses and other health care providers, occurs routinely when patients make health care decisions. The values underlying informed consent (promotion of patients’ well-being and respect for their self-determination) are embedded in the dominant American culture. Nurses who apply the USA’s cultural values of informed consent when caring for patients who come from other cultures encounter some ethical dilemmas. This descriptive study, conducted with Latino, Chinese and Anglo-American cancer patients in a large, public, west-coast (...)
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