Results for 'B. C. Barish'

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  1.  5
    A Large Estate in Egypt in the Third Century B.C. A Study in Economic History. By Michael Rostovtzeff. Pp. 209, 3 Plates. Wisconsin: Madison, 1922. $ 2. [REVIEW]C. E. C. - 1922 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 42 (2):292-294.
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  2.  36
    Thessaly in the Fourth Century B. C.M. C. & H. W. Westlake - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:254.
  3.  39
    Ancient Corinth, with a Topographical Sketch of the Corinthia. Part I: From the Earliest Times to 404 B. C.M. C. & J. G. O'Neill - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:371.
  4.  36
    A Short History of Antioch, 300 B. C. -- A. D. 1268.N. H. B. & E. S. Bouchier - 1921 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 41:295.
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  5.  40
    Book Review:The Meaning of National Guilds. C. E. Bechhofer, M. B. Reckitt. [REVIEW]D. B. C. - 1919 - Ethics 29 (4):504-.
  6.  28
    Search for B-Decay to Higgs Bosons for Higgs Boson Masses Between 50 and 210 MeV/C 2.A. Snyder, W. N. Murray, G. Abrams, C. E. Adolphsen, C. Akerlof, J. P. Alexander, M. Alvarez, D. Amidel, A. R. Baden, B. C. Barish, T. Barklow, B. A. Barnett, J. Bartelt, D. Blockus, G. Bonvicini, A. Boyarski, J. Boyer, B. Brabson, A. Breakstone, J. M. Brom, F. Bulos, P. R. Burchat, D. L. Burke, F. Butler, F. Calvino, R. J. Cence, J. Chapman, D. Cords, D. P. Coupal, H. C. Destaebler, J. M. de DorfanDorfan, P. S. Drell, G. J. Feldman, E. Fernandez, R. C. Field, W. T. Ford, C. Fordham, R. Frey, D. Fujino, K. K. Gan, G. Gidal, L. Gladney, T. Glanzman, M. S. Gold, G. Goldhaber, P. Grosse-Wiesmann, J. Haggerty, G. Hanson, R. Harr, F. A. Harris, C. M. Hawkes, K. Hayes, D. Herrup, C. A. Heusch, T. Himel, R. J. Hollebeek, D. Hutchinson, J. Hylen, W. R. Innes, M. Jaffre, J. A. Jaros, I. Juricic, J. A. Kadyk, D. Karlen, J. Kent, S. R. Klein, W. Koska, W. Kozanecki, A. J. Lankford, R. R. Larsen, B. W. Leclaire, M. E. Levi, A. M. Litke, N. S. Lockyer, V. Lüth, J. A. J. Matthews, B. D. di MeyerMilliken, K. C. Moffeit, L. Müller, J. Nash, M. E. Nelson, D. Nitz, H. Ogren & R. A. Ong - unknown
    We use data from the Mark II experiment at PEP to search for the process B→h0X for mh0 between 50 and 210 MeV/c2. No evidence for the Higgs boson is seen in this mass range. The limit obtained rules out the standard Higgs boson for masses between 70 and 210 MeV/c2 and significantly constrains extensions of the Higgs sector. © 1989.
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  7.  28
    A-B, B-C, a-C Mediation Paradigm: Recall of a-B Following Varying Numbers of Trials of a-C Learning.George E. Weaver & Rudolph W. Schulz - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (1):113.
  8.  11
    The a-B, B-C, a-C Mediation Paradigm: A-C Performance in the Absence of Study Trials.George E. Weaver, Ronald H. Hopkins & Rudolf W. Schulz - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (4):670.
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  9.  33
    On the Egyptian Expedition of 459-4 B.C.M. O. B. Caspari - 1913 - Classical Quarterly 7 (03):198-.
    It appears to be a generally accepted opinion among modern historians that the expedition which the Athenians led up-Nile in 459 B.C. in support of the Egyptian insurrection against Persia was an exceptionally large one, numbering no less than 200 sail. Modern authors also seem to imply, though they may not say so explicitly, that the whole of this armada was involved in the catastrophe which overtook the rebels in 454 B.C.
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  10.  13
    The Tribute Quota Lists From 430 to 425 B.C.Harold B. Mattingly - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):83-.
    Bradeen and McGregor with exemplary skill and patience re-examined the almost desperately worn front face of ATL ii List 26. They were able to prove that the lines of its prescript were precisely forty-seven letters long. This excludes the possibility of dating this list 430/29 or 428/7 B.C., since only six spaces are available for the first numeral. They rightly maintained that the ATL Lists 25 and 26 must be kept together, but unlike them I would challenge the ATL numbering (...)
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  11.  18
    The Etruscans and the Sicilian Expedition of 414-413 B.C.M. O. B. Caspari - 1911 - Classical Quarterly 5 (02):113-.
    It has usually been held, on the strength of several passages in Thucydides, that the Athenian army which was besieging Syracuse in 414–413 b.c. contained a contingent of Etruscans desirous of retaliating upon the Syracusans for losses inflicted upon them in past days—e.g., in 474 at Cumae and in 453 at Elba.
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  12.  6
    On the Ivratio Italiae of 32 B.C.M. O. B. Caspari - 1911 - Classical Quarterly 5 (04):230-.
    ‘Ivravit in mea uerba tota Italia sponte sua et me belli quo uici ad Actium ducem depoposcit.’ In these words the Emperor Augustus clearly meant to suggest that the war in which he got rid of Mark Antony was none of his making, but was imposed upon him by the free and self-determined action of the Italian nation. Modern historians have unanimously refused to regard Augustus as a passive instrument in the hands of the Roman people at large; yet they (...)
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  13.  7
    L. Cornelius Sisenna and the Early First Century B.C.Elizabeth Rawson - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (2):327-346.
    The most important historical work in Latin that was actually written in the first half of the first century B C. was L. Cornelius Sisenna's history of the War of the Allies and the Civil Wars which followed it, up to Sulla's dictatorship or conceivably death-the most important one that was not written being of course Cicero's. Sallust praised Sisenna's work highly in the Jugurtba, though complaining that it was not sufficiently frank about Sulla, and his own lost histories began, (...)
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  14.  71
    Agent-Neutral Reasons: Are They for Everyone?: B. C. Postow.B. C. Postow - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (2):249-257.
    According to both deontologists and consequentialists, if there is a reason to promote the general happiness – or to promote any other state of affairs unrelated to one's own projects or self-interest – then the reason must apply to everyone. This view seems almost self-evident; to challenge it is to challenge the way we think of moral reasons. I contend, however, that the view depends on the unwarranted assumption that the only way to restrict the application scope of a reason (...)
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  15. A History of Women Philosophers, Volume 1: Ancient Women Philosophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D.Mary Ellen Waithe - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):155-159.
    A History of Women Philosophers, Volume I: Ancient Women Philoophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., edited by Mary Ellen Waithe, is an important but somewhat frustrating book. It is filled with tantalizing glimpses into the lives and thoughts of some of our earliest philosophical foremothers. Yet it lacks a clear unifying theme, and the abrupt transitions from one philosopher and period to the next are sometimes disconcerting. The overall effect is not unlike that of viewing an expansive landscape, illuminated only (...)
     
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  16.  31
    The Athenian Experiment: Building an Imagined Political Community in Ancient Attica, 508-490 B.C.Greg Anderson - 2003 - University of Michigan Press.
    In barely the space of one generation, Athens was transformed from a conventional city-state into something completely new--a region-state on a scale previously unthinkable. This book sets out to answer a seemingly simple question: How and when did the Athenian state attain the anomalous size that gave it such influence in Greek politics and culture in the classical period? Many scholars argue that Athens's incorporation of Attica was a gradual development, largely completed some two hundred years before the classical era. (...)
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  17.  19
    The Private Banks in Fourth-Century B.C. Athens: A Reappraisal.Kirsty M. W. Shipton - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):396-.
    This essay has two aims: to affirm the significance of private banking in fourthcentury B.C. Athens, and to propose a model of its role in the economy. Such a project is desirable because there has been a tendency since the publication of Finley's The Ancient Economy to minimalize the significance of banking in ancient Greece. Banking is seen as a ‘fringe activity’ largely carried out by such ‘outsiders’ as metics and ex-slaves.Consequently historians have frequently overlooked the value of banking as (...)
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  18.  14
    Greek Poetry 2000–700 B.C.M. L. West - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (02):179-.
    They used to believe that mankind began in 4004 B.C. and the Greeks in 776. We now know that these last five thousand years during which man has left written record of himself are but a minute fraction of the time he has spent developing his culture. We now understand that the evolution of human society, its laws and customs, its economics, its religious practices, its games, its languages, is a very slow process, to be measured in millennia. In the (...)
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  19.  10
    Ptolemy Soter's Annexation of Syria 320 B.C.Pat Wheatley - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):433-.
    The incursions of Ptolemy Soter into Coelê-Syria and Phoenicia after the death of Perdiccas have received scant attention from scholars in recent years, and the little they have received has failed to draw some vital conclusions. The sources are compressed, but unanimous, that very soon after the settlement of Triparadeisus, Ptolemy subverted and overran the region, fortified and garrisoned the cities, and returned to Egypt. He seems to have held this satrapy until it became a major arena in the third (...)
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  20.  25
    L. Cornelius Sisenna and the Early First Century B.C.Elizabeth Rawson - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):327-.
    The most important historical work in Latin that was actually written in the first half of the first century B C. was L. Cornelius Sisenna's history of the War of the Allies and the Civil Wars which followed it, up to Sulla's dictatorship or conceivably death-the most important one that was not written being of course Cicero's. Sallust praised Sisenna's work highly in the Jugurtba, though complaining that it was not sufficiently frank about Sulla, and his own lost histories began, (...)
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  21.  32
    Associative Unlearning of A-B Following A-C or A-Br Interpolation.Dennis J. Delprato & Bertram E. Garskof - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (4p1):685.
  22.  11
    Anatomy in Alexandria in the Third Century B.C.James Longrigg - 1988 - British Journal for the History of Science 21 (4):455-488.
    The most striking advances in the knowledge of human anatomy and physiology that the world had ever known—or was to know until the seventeenth century A.D.—took place in Hellenistic Alexandria. The city was founded in 331 B.C. by Alexander the Great. After the tatter's death in 323 B.C. and the subsequent dissolution of his empire, it became the capital of one of his generals, Ptolemy, son of Lagus, who established the Ptolemaic dynasty there. The first Ptolemy, subsequently named Soter , (...)
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  23.  40
    The Actions of Philip II in 347 and 346 B.C.: A Reply to N. G. L. Hammond.John Buckler - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):380-.
    Professor N. G. L. Hammond has of late published some of his thoughts on the activities of Philip II in 347 and 346 B.C. In addition he has treated aspects of Philip's earlier involvement in Thessalian, Thracian, and Phokian affairs. In the process he has in many instances disagreed with a number of current findings. Among those challenged are some of mine. Healthy scholarly debate is always desirable, and in this f spirit I should welcome an opportunity to contest Professor (...)
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  24.  17
    The Koprologoi at Athens in the Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. J. Owens - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):44-.
    The collection and disposal of rubbish and waste and the maintenance of a decent standard of hygiene was as much a problem for ancient city authorities as for modern town councils. The responsibility for the removal of waste would often be dependent upon the nature of the rubbish and the facilities which city authorities offered. Thus early in the fourth century B.C. the agoranomic law from Piraeus prohibited individuals from piling earth and other waste on the streets and compelled the (...)
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  25.  24
    Stimulus Meaningfulness, Transfer, and Retroactive Inhibition in the A-B, A-C Paradigm.George E. Weaver, Robert L. McCann & Robert J. Wehr - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):255.
  26.  18
    General and Specific Components of Retroactive Inhibition in the A-B, A-C Paradigm.Isabel M. Birnbaum - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):188.
  27.  20
    “The Evolution of Funerary Ideology Among the Elites of Roccagloriosa During the 5th-4th Centuries B.C.”.Katrina Tarnawsky - 2013 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 4 (2).
    The practice of mortuary archaeology often relies upon the examination of funerary assemblages in order to reconstruct socio-cultural changes among a group of people. This paper takes a closer look at the grave goods from two pairs of Iron-Age elite Lucanian tombs at the settlement of Roccagloriosa in order to detect how funerary ideology changed over time. From the evidence I argue that there was an evolution of aristocratic gentilician identity alongside the establishment of the newly formed Lucanian ethnos in (...)
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  28.  17
    Bounded Commutative B-C-K Logic and Lukasiewicz Logic.Marta Sagastume - 2005 - Manuscrito 28 (2):575-583.
    In [9] it is proved the categorical isomorphism of two varieties: bounded commutative BCK-algebras and MV -algebras. The class of MV -algebras is the algebraic counterpart of the infinite valued propositional calculus L of Lukasiewicz . The main objective of the present paper is to study that isomorphism from the perspective of logic. The B-C-K logic is algebraizable and the quasivariety of BCKalgebras is the equivalent algebraic semantics for that logic . We call commutative B-C-K logic, briefly cBCK, to the (...)
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  29.  28
    Res Gestae 34.1 and the Settlement of 27 B.C.William Turpin - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):427-.
    Augustus' account of the events of 28 and 27 b.c. is maddeningly vague. In part the problem is simply that his individual phrases are ambiguous, but a more fundamental difficulty is the very nature of the Res Gestae itself. The idea of publishing such a self-satisfied account of one's own doings is so alien to our modern sensibilities that we tend to read the Res Gestae as though Augustus were capable of saying almost anything. We have concluded too easily, therefore, (...)
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  30.  15
    The Policy of Clodius From 58 to 56 B.C.Frank Burr Marsh - 1927 - Classical Quarterly 21 (1):30-36.
    The motive of Clodius in attacking the validity of Caesar's laws in the latter part of 58 B.C. has been the subject of many conjectures on the part of modern historians. In a recent article1 Pocock has propounded a new theory as to the position and policy of the turbulent tribune, which is highly suggestive and deserving of a careful consideration. In the first place Pocock, in opposition to all previous historians, flatly denies that Clodius made any such attack at (...)
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  31.  27
    Sulla's New Senators in 81 B.C.H. Hill - 1932 - Classical Quarterly 26 (3-4):170-.
    One of Sulla's first acts on assuming the dictatorship in 81 B.C. was to fill up the numbers of the Senate by the addition of some 300 new members. Tradition is divided on the question of the rank of these men before their promotion, and no unanimity has yet been reached in the matter. There are two distinct versions in the ancient authorities, both equally well attested. Appian and the Epitomator of Livy state that the new members were equites, while (...)
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  32.  24
    Rome and Rhodes in the Second Century B.C.: A Historiographical Inquiry.Erich S. Gruen - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (01):58-.
    Ancient Rhodes reached a pinnacle of power in the early second century B.C. For twenty years—from Apamea to Pydna—her fleet was unrivalled in the Aegean and her mainland possessions encompassed most of Lycia and Caria. Ally and helpmate of Rome in the war on Antiochus III, Rhodes gained much profit from the association, in prestige and territorial acquisitions. But her heyday was brief, her fall swift and calamitous. After Pydna, Rhodes felt the heavy hand of Rome: she forfeited most of (...)
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  33.  14
    Thucydides on the Third of August, 431 B.C.J. A. R. Munro - 1919 - Classical Quarterly 13 (3-4):127-.
    Thucydides, II. 28, records an eclipse of the sun in the summer of the first year of the Peloponnesian war. It can be no other than the annular eclipse of the 3rd of August, 431 B.C. He describes the phenomenon so accurately and with so many details that we can hardly doubt that he observed it himself — Tο δ' αủτο θέρονς γονμηνι κατά σελήγηγ, σπερ και μόγογ δοκει ειναι γιγνεσθαι δνγατόγ, ό λιος έξέλιπε μετά μεσημβριαγ και πάλιγ άγ επληρθη, (...)
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  34.  13
    The Carmen Saecvlare of Horace and its Performance, June 3 B.C. 17.W. Warde Fowler - 1910 - Classical Quarterly 4 (03):145-.
    The great object of Augustus in celebrating Ludi saeculares in 17 b.c. was to encourage the belief in himself and the consequent active loyalty to himself, as the restorer of the pax deorum,—the good relation between the divine and human inhabitants of Rome. So far he had tried to attain this end by the ancient usual and proper means, i.e. by carrying out the various regulations of the ius diuinum, so many of which had long been neglected. But in that (...)
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  35.  21
    The Bacchanalian Cult of 186 B.C.Tenney Frank - 1927 - Classical Quarterly 21 (3-4):128-.
    There is no little division of opinion regarding the provenance of the Bacchanalian rites which were suppressed with much cruelty by the Senate in 186 B.C. Since the Dionysiac orgies were native to Phrygia, and since Livy tells the story in question immediately after describing the immoral practices that were brought back from Asia by the returning army of Manlius Vulso in 187, it has frequently been assumed that Anatolia was the source of these rites. Reitzenstein and Cichorius, in discussing (...)
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  36.  6
    Two ‘Syntactic Errors’ in Transcription: Seneca, Thyestes 33 and Lucan, B.C.279.John N. Grant - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (1):282-286.
    Some of the more difficult archetypal corruptions to detect are those that occurred, not when a scribe was mindlessly copying what was before him, but when he was paying some attention to the sense of his text and departed from his exemplar by wrongly anticipating how the sequence of thought would develop. The resulting text may give sense, even though it does not reflect what the author wrote. It is suggested here that such a process led to corruption at Seneca, (...)
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  37.  12
    Triumviral Politics, the Oath of 32 B.C. And the Veterans.Rosalinde Kearsley - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):828-834.
    The compact formed between Antonius, Lepidus and Octavian near Bononia in November 43 b.c. , commonly named the second triumvirate, was characterized by civil conflict. The major battles at Philippi, Perusia and Naulochus led to the presence of many legions in Italy. In addition, a large number of time-served soldiers were settled throughout the peninsula. The requirement of land for the veterans meant conflicting interests arose with landowners who were dispossessed to make way for them. The impact of the army (...)
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  38.  5
    Greek Poetry 2000–700 B.C.M. L. West - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (2):179-192.
    They used to believe that mankind began in 4004 B.C. and the Greeks in 776. We now know that these last five thousand years during which man has left written record of himself are but a minute fraction of the time he has spent developing his culture. We now understand that the evolution of human society, its laws and customs, its economics, its religious practices, its games, its languages, is a very slow process, to be measured in millennia. In the (...)
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  39.  12
    Senate Intervenants in 50 B.C.F. X. Ryan - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):542-.
    M. Bonnefond-Coudry has performed a great service by compiling a list of senators who are known to have spoken in the senate in the first century b.c. Yet her list for the year 50 invites a thoroughgoing revision. Beside the rubric ‘supplicatio à Cicéron’ she gives the following list: Cato, Hirrus, Balbus, Lentulus , Domitius , Scipio, Favonius. She also notes that Pompey spoke at a session late in the year , and maintains that Scipio spoke on 1 December.
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  40.  11
    Two 'Syntactic Errors' in Transcription: Seneca, Thyestes 33 and Lucan, B.C.279.John N. Grant - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (01):282-.
    Some of the more difficult archetypal corruptions to detect are those that occurred, not when a scribe was mindlessly copying what was before him, but when he was paying some attention to the sense of his text and departed from his exemplar by wrongly anticipating how the sequence of thought would develop. The resulting text may give sense, even though it does not reflect what the author wrote. It is suggested here that such a process led to corruption at Seneca, (...)
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  41. History of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 2: The Period of Classical Learning From the Second Century B.C. To the Twentieth Century A.D. [REVIEW]Derk Bodde (ed.) - 1983 - Princeton University Press.
    Since its original publication in Chinese in the 1930s, this work has been accepted by Chinese scholars as the most important contribution to the study of their country's philosophy. In 1952 the book was published by Princeton University Press in an English translation by the distinguished scholar of Chinese history, Derk Bodde, "the dedicated translator of Fung Yu-lan's huge history of Chinese philosophy". Available for the first time in paperback, it remains the most complete work on the subject in any (...)
     
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  42. Cause, Mind, and Reality: Essays Honoring C. B. Martin.John Heil (ed.) - 1989 - Norwell: Kluwer.
  43.  46
    Individual and Community: The Rise of the Polis, 800-500 B.C.Chester G. Starr - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    During the three centuries from 800 to 500 B.C., the Greek world evolved from a primitive society- -both culturally and economically- -to one whose artistic products dominated all Mediterranean markets, supported by a wide overseas trade. In the following two centuries came the literary, philosophical, and artistic masterpieces of the classic area. Vital to this advance was the development of the polis, a collective institution in which citizens had rights as well as duties under the rule of law, a system (...)
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  44.  9
    The Cambridge Ancient History. Revised Edition, Volume II, Chapter XVIII. Assyria and Babylon C. 1370-1300 B. C.Volume II, Chapter XXV. Assyrian Military Power 1300-1200 B. C.Volume II, Chapter XXXI. Assyria and Babylonia C. 1200-1000 B. C. [REVIEW]David B. Weisberg, C. J. Gadd, J. M. Munn-Rankin & D. J. Wiseman - 1970 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 90 (2):330.
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  45.  14
    Hellenistic Sculpture. Vol. 2: The Styles of Ca. 200-100 B.C.La Sculpture Grecque. Vol. 2: La Periode classiquePictorial Narrative in Ancient Greek Art. [REVIEW]Amy C. Smith, B. S. Ridgway, C. Rolley & M. D. Stansbury-O'Donnell - 2002 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 122:202-203.
  46.  7
    The Cambridge Ancient History. Volume I, Chapter XIII. The Cities of BabyloniaThe Cambridge Ancient History. Volume I, Chapter XIX. The Dynasty of Agade and the Gutian InvasionThe Cambridge Ancient History. Volume I, Chapter XXII. Babylonia C. 2120-1800 B. C.The Cambridge Ancient History. Volume II, Chapter V. Hammurabi and the End of His Dynasty. [REVIEW]David B. Weisberg & C. J. Gadd - 1967 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 87 (3):352.
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  47.  10
    Everyday Things in Classical GreeceChild Life in Greek ArtDaedalus and ThespisThe Treasurers of AthenaAthenian Financial Documents of the Fifth CenturyA Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions to the End of the Fifth Century B. C.H. T. W.-G., Marjorie, C. H. B. Quennell, Anita E. Klein, Walter Miller, William Scott Ferguson, Benjamin Dean Meritt & Marcus N. Tod - 1933 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 53:133.
  48.  6
    The Porticello Shipwreck: A Mediterranean Merchant Vessel of 415-385 B. C. [REVIEW]J. F. Lazenby, C. Jones Eiseman & B. Sismondo Ridgway - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:257-257.
  49. The (a)(B)(C) of Modal Epistemology: A Further Attempt to Meet the Epistemic Challenge.Sonia Roca - manuscript
    This paper is about the epistemic challenge for mind-independence approaches of modality. The challenge is to elucidate the possibility conditions for modal knowledge, and arises from acceptance of the following three premises: (a) We have modal knowledge (which, for a mind-independence theorist is knowledge of the extra-mental world); (b) Any knowledge of the extra-mental world is grounded on causal affection; and (c) Any knowledge grounded on causal affection cannot outrun knowledge of mere truths (as opposed to modal truths). Most attempts (...)
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  50. Psyche: A Journal of General and Linguistic Psychology 1920-1952. Edited by ≪b>c.K. Ogden≪/B≫.C. K. Ogden (ed.) - 1995 - Routledge.
    Launched in 1920 by C K Ogden and others as the successor to the Cambridge Magazine , Psyche occupied a unique place for over 30 years as a journal of general and linguistic psychology. Committed from the outset to keeping readers abreast of developments in the burgeoning fields of experimental, theoretical, and applied psychology, Psyche provided not only systematic reporting in these domains but set itself the task of stimulating research of high quality by the critical thrust of its editorial (...)
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