5 found
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Benjamin Gesundheit [3]B. Gesundheit [2]
  1.  40
    Medical Care for Terrorists—To Treat or Not to Treat?Benjamin Gesundheit, Nachman Ash, Shraga Blazer & Avraham I. Rivkind - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):40-42.
    With the escalation of terrorism worldwide in recent years, situations arise in which the perpetration of violence and the defense of human rights come into conflict, creating serious ethical problems. The Geneva Convention provides guidelines for the medical treatment of enemy wounded and sick, as well as prisoners of war. However, there are no comparable provisions for the treatment of terrorists, who can be termed unlawful combatants or unprivileged belligerents. Two cases of severely injured terrorists are presented here to illustrate (...)
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  2. A case against justified non-voluntary active euthanasia (the groningen protocol).Alan Jotkowitz, S. Glick & B. Gesundheit - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):23 – 26.
    The Groningen Protocol allows active euthanasia of severely ill newborns with unbearable suffering. Defenders of the protocol insist that the protocol refers to terminally ill infants and that quality of life should not be a factor in the decision to euthanize an infant. They also argue that there should be no ethical difference between active and passive euthanasia of these infants. However, nowhere in the protocol does it refer to terminally ill infants; on the contrary, the developers of the protocol (...)
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  3.  27
    Reflections on the Golubchuk Case.Benjamin Gesundheit - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):73-74.
  4.  30
    Medical Care for Terrorists–Yes to Treat!Benjamin Gesundheit, Nachman Ash, Shraga Blazer & Avraham I. Rivkind - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):3-4.
    With the escalation of terrorism worldwide in recent years, situations arise in which the perpetration of violence and the defense of human rights come into conflict, creating serious ethical problems. The Geneva Convention provides guidelines for the medical treatment of enemy wounded and sick, as well as prisoners of war. However, there are no comparable provisions for the treatment of terrorists, who can be termed unlawful combatants or unprivileged belligerents. Two cases of severely injured terrorists are presented here to illustrate (...)
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  5.  27
    Comforting presence: The role of nurses and social workers in clinical ethics.A. Jotkowitz & B. Gesundheit - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (4):14 – 15.