Order:
  1.  17
    Horace, Carm. 3.30.1–51.B. J. Gibson - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):312-.
    In the poem which sets the seal on his three books of odes, Horace declares that his monument to himself will be more durable than bronze and higher than the pyramids. As T. E. Page noted in his commentary, aere can suggest not only bronze tablets, but also commemorative statuary, although tablets seems more to the fore here, given the reference to monumentum As for the pyramids, they are a fine example of grandiloquent architecture, but of a kind which is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  8
    Catullus 1.5–7.B. J. Gibson - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):569-.
    n this note I wish to reopen discussion of the role of Cornelius Nepos in Catullus' dedicatory poem. The Callimachean features of Catullus' assessment of his own work have been well documented. However I believe that, since this is a poem where Catullus evaluates not only his own work, but also that of Nepos, a closer examination of the latter is called for.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  10
    Catullus 1.5–7.B. J. Gibson - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):569-573.
    n this note I wish to reopen discussion of the role of Cornelius Nepos in Catullus' dedicatory poem. The Callimachean features of Catullus' assessment of his own work have been well documented. However I believe that, since this is a poem where Catullus evaluates not only his own work, but also that of Nepos, a closer examination of the latter is called for.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  27
    G. Lee : Propertius: The Poems. With an Introduction by R. O. A. M. Lyne . Pp. Xxv + 205. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996. Paper, £6.99/$8.95. ISBN: 0-19-283198-4. [REVIEW]B. J. Gibson - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):495-496.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  14
    Statius and Insomnia: Allusion and Meaning in Silvae 5.4.B. J. Gibson - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):457-.
    Statius′ Silvae 5.4 is one of the best-known poems in the collection, although it is also one of the least representative. Its nineteen lines make it the shortest poem in the Silvae, and although there are other brief poems, such as those describing the parrot of Melior and the tame lion , it is quite different from the many longer poems that deal with subjects and persons from contemporary society. Of course insomnia must always be a universal issue, but this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  8
    Statius and Insomnia: Allusion and Meaning in Silvae 5.4.B. J. Gibson - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (2):457-468.
    Statius′ Silvae 5.4 is one of the best-known poems in the collection, although it is also one of the least representative. Its nineteen lines make it the shortest poem in the Silvae, and although there are other brief poems, such as those describing the parrot of Melior and the tame lion, it is quite different from the many longer poems that deal with subjects and persons from contemporary society. Of course insomnia must always be a universal issue, but this is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark