30 found
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  1. What is Computation?B. Jack Copeland - 1996 - Synthese 108 (3):335-59.
    To compute is to execute an algorithm. More precisely, to say that a device or organ computes is to say that there exists a modelling relationship of a certain kind between it and a formal specification of an algorithm and supporting architecture. The key issue is to delimit the phrase of a certain kind. I call this the problem of distinguishing between standard and nonstandard models of computation. The successful drawing of this distinction guards Turing's 1936 analysis of computation against (...)
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  2. The Genesis of Possible Worlds Semantics.B. Jack Copeland - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (2):99-137.
    This article traces the development of possible worlds semantics through the work of: Wittgenstein, 1913-1921; Feys, 1924; McKinsey, 1945; Carnap, 1945-1947; McKinsey, Tarski and Jónsson, 1947-1952; von Wright, 1951; Becker, 1952; Prior, 1953-1954; Montague, 1955; Meredith and Prior, 1956; Geach, 1960; Smiley, 1955-1957; Kanger, 1957; Hintikka, 1957; Guillaume, 1958; Binkley, 1958; Bayart, 1958-1959; Drake, 1959-1961; Kripke, 1958-1965.
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  3. The Church-Turing Thesis.B. Jack Copeland - 2008 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Metaphysics Research Lab, Stanford University.
    There are various equivalent formulations of the Church-Turing thesis. A common one is that every effective computation can be carried out by a Turing machine. The Church-Turing thesis is often misunderstood, particularly in recent writing in the philosophy of mind.
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  4.  16
    The Indeterminacy of Computation.Nir Fresco, B. Jack Copeland & Marty J. Wolf - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):12753-12775.
    Do the dynamics of a physical system determine what function the system computes? Except in special cases, the answer is no: it is often indeterminate what function a given physical system computes. Accordingly, care should be taken when the question ‘What does a particular neuronal system do?’ is answered by hypothesising that the system computes a particular function. The phenomenon of the indeterminacy of computation has important implications for the development of computational explanations of biological systems. Additionally, the phenomenon lends (...)
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  5. Hypercomputation.B. Jack Copeland - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (4):461-502.
  6. Narrow Versus Wide Mechanism: Including a Re-Examination of Turing’s Views on the Mind-Machine Issue.B. Jack Copeland - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):5-32.
  7. The Turing Test.B. Jack Copeland - 2000 - Minds and Machines 10 (4):519-539.
    Turing''s test has been much misunderstood. Recently unpublished material by Turing casts fresh light on his thinking and dispels a number of philosophical myths concerning the Turing test. Properly understood, the Turing test withstands objections that are popularly believed to be fatal.
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  8. Artificial Intelligence: A Philosophical Introduction.B. Jack Copeland - 1993 - Cambridge: Blackwell.
    Presupposing no familiarity with the technical concepts of either philosophy or computing, this clear introduction reviews the progress made in AI since the inception of the field in 1956. Copeland goes on to analyze what those working in AI must achieve before they can claim to have built a thinking machine and appraises their prospects of succeeding.There are clear introductions to connectionism and to the language of thought hypothesis which weave together material from philosophy, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. John Searle's (...)
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  9.  72
    Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.B. Jack Copeland & Richard Sylvan - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-66.
  10. Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable?B. Jack Copeland & Oron Shagrir - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (2):221-239.
    Accelerating Turing machines have attracted much attention in the last decade or so. They have been described as “the work-horse of hypercomputation”. But do they really compute beyond the “Turing limit”—e.g., compute the halting function? We argue that the answer depends on what you mean by an accelerating Turing machine, on what you mean by computation, and even on what you mean by a Turing machine. We show first that in the current literature the term “accelerating Turing machine” is used (...)
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  11. Super Turing-Machines.B. Jack Copeland - 1998 - Complexity 4 (1):30-32.
  12.  64
    Deviant Encodings and Turing’s Analysis of Computability.B. Jack Copeland & Diane Proudfoot - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):247-252.
    Turing’s analysis of computability has recently been challenged; it is claimed that it is circular to analyse the intuitive concept of numerical computability in terms of the Turing machine. This claim threatens the view, canonical in mathematics and cognitive science, that the concept of a systematic procedure or algorithm is to be explicated by reference to the capacities of Turing machines. We defend Turing’s analysis against the challenge of ‘deviant encodings’.Keywords: Systematic procedure; Turing machine; Church–Turing thesis; Deviant encoding; Acceptable encoding; (...)
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  13. The Essential Turing.B. Jack Copeland - 2005 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (4):541-542.
     
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  14. Physical Computation: How General Are Gandy’s Principles for Mechanisms?B. Jack Copeland & Oron Shagrir - 2007 - Minds and Machines 17 (2):217-231.
    What are the limits of physical computation? In his ‘Church’s Thesis and Principles for Mechanisms’, Turing’s student Robin Gandy proved that any machine satisfying four idealised physical ‘principles’ is equivalent to some Turing machine. Gandy’s four principles in effect define a class of computing machines (‘Gandy machines’). Our question is: What is the relationship of this class to the class of all (ideal) physical computing machines? Gandy himself suggests that the relationship is identity. We do not share this view. We (...)
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  15. The Chinese Room From a Logical Point of View.B. Jack Copeland - 2003 - In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16. The Curious Case of the Chinese Gym.B. Jack Copeland - 1993 - Synthese 95 (2):173-86.
    Searle has recently used two adaptations of his Chinese room argument in an attack on connectionism. I show that these new forms of the argument are fallacious. First I give an exposition of and rebuttal to the original Chinese room argument, and then a brief introduction to the essentials of connectionism.
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  17.  77
    On Vague Objects, Fuzzy Logic and Fractal Boundaries.B. Jack Copeland - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):83-96.
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  18. Vague Identity and Fuzzy Logic.B. Jack Copeland - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy 94 (10):514-534.
  19.  59
    The Modern History of Computing.B. Jack Copeland - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  20.  19
    Arthur Prior.B. Jack Copeland - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21.  50
    Prior, Translational Semantics, and the Barcan Formula.B. Jack Copeland - 2016 - Synthese 193 (11):3507-3519.
    The revolution in semantics in the late 1960s and 1970s overturned an earlier competing paradigm, ‘translational’ semantics. I revive and defend Prior’s translational semantics for modals and tense-modals. I also show how to extend Prior’s propositional modal semantics to quantificational modal logic, and use the resulting semantics to formalize Prior’s own counterexample to the Barcan Formula.
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  22.  13
    Vague Identity and Fuzzy Logic.B. Jack Copeland - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy 94 (10):514.
  23. Prior's Life and Legacy.B. Jack Copeland - 1996 - In Logic and Reality: Essays on the Legacy of Arthur Prior. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--40.
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  24.  20
    Alan Turing's Automatic Computing Engine: The Master Codebreaker's Struggle to Build the Modern Computer.B. Jack Copeland (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The mathematical genius Alan Turing, well known for his crucial wartime role in breaking the ENIGMA code, was the first to conceive of the fundamental principle of the modern computer. This text contains first hand accounts by Turing and by the pioneers of computing who worked with him on his revolutionary design for an electronic computing machine - his Automatic Computing Engine.
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  25.  82
    Indeterminate Identity, Contingent Identity, and Property Identity, Aristotelian-Style.B. Jack Copeland - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28 (1):11-25.
  26. Alan Turing's Electronic Brain: The Struggle to Build the Ace, the World's Fastest Computer.B. Jack Copeland (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Well known for this crucial wartime role in breaking the ENIGMA code, this book chronicles Turing's struggle to build the modern computer. Includes first hand accounts by Turing and the pioneers of computing who worked with him.
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  27. Alan Turing's Electronic Brain: The Struggle to Build the Ace, the World's Fastest Computer.B. Jack Copeland (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Well known for this crucial wartime role in breaking the ENIGMA code, this book chronicles Turing's struggle to build the modern computer. Includes first hand accounts by Turing and the pioneers of computing who worked with him.
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  28.  18
    Commentary.B. Jack Copeland - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (Supplement):83-96.
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  29.  10
    From the Entscheidungsproblem to the Personal Computer–and Beyond.B. Jack Copeland - 2011 - In Matthias Baaz (ed.), Kurt Gödel and the Foundations of Mathematics: Horizons of Truth. Cambridge University Press. pp. 151.
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  30.  8
    Indeterminate Identity, Contingent Identity, and Property Identity, Aristotelian-Style.B. Jack Copeland - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28:11-26.
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