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  1.  18
    Implicit moral evaluations: A multinomial modeling approach.C. Daryl Cameron, B. Keith Payne, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Julian A. Scheffer & Michael Inzlicht - 2017 - Cognition 158 (C):224-241.
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  2. Do theories of implicit race bias change moral judgments?C. Daryl Cameron, Joshua Knobe & B. Keith Payne - 2010 - Social Justice Research 23:272-289.
    Recent work in social psychology suggests that people harbor “implicit race biases,” biases which can be unconscious or uncontrollable. Because awareness and control have traditionally been deemed necessary for the ascription of moral responsibility, implicit biases present a unique challenge: do we pardon discrimination based on implicit biases because of its unintentional nature, or do we punish discrimination regardless of how it comes about? The present experiments investigated the impact such theories have upon moral judgments about racial discrimination. The results (...)
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  3. Attitudes as accessibility bias: Dissociating automatic and controlled processes.B. Keith Payne, Larry L. Jacoby & Alan J. Lambert - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 393-420.
  4.  17
    Beyond contingency awareness: the role of influence awareness in resisting conditioned attitudes.Florin A. Sava, B. Keith Payne, Silvia Măgurean, Daniel E. Iancu & Andrei Rusu - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (1):156-169.
    ABSTRACTEvaluative conditioning procedures change people’s evaluations of stimuli that are paired with pleasant or unpleasant items. To test whether influence awareness allows people to resist such...
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  5.  29
    Automatic attitudes and alcohol: Does implicit liking predict drinking?B. Keith Payne, Olesya Govorun & Nathan L. Arbuckle - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (2):238-271.
    Addictive behaviour has qualities that make it ideal for study using implicit techniques. Addictive behaviours are mediated in part by automatic responses to drug cues, and there is sometimes social pressure to distort self-reports. However, relationships between implicit attitudes and addictive behaviours have been inconsistent. Using a new implicit measure, the affect misattribution procedure (AMP), we found consistent evidence that drinking-related behaviours are systematically related to implicit attitudes. The procedure predicted a behavioural choice to drink beer and self-reported typical drinking (...)
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  6.  36
    Corrigendum to “Implicit moral evaluations: A multinomial modeling approach” [Cognition 158 (2017) 224–241].C. Daryl Cameron, B. Keith Payne, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Julian A. Scheffer & Michael Inzlicht - 2018 - Cognition 173 (C):138.
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  7.  63
    Accuracy and error: Constraints on process models in social psychology.Alan J. Lambert, B. Keith Payne & Larry L. Jacoby - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):350-351.
    In light of an historical obsession with human error, Krueger & Funder (K&F) suggest that social psychologists should emphasize the strengths of social perception. In our view, however, absolute levels of accuracy (or error) in any given experiment are less important than underlying processes. We discuss the use of the process-dissociation procedure for gaining insight into the mechanisms underlying accuracy and error.
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  8.  6
    Two thousand years after Archimedes, psychologist finds three topics that will simply not yield to the experimental method.B. Keith Payne & Mahzarin R. Banaji - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Cesario argues that experiments cannot illuminate real group disparities because they leave out factors that operate in ordinary life. But what Cesario calls flaws are, in fact, the point of the experimental method. Of all the topics in science, we have to wonder why racial discrimination would be uniquely unsuited for investigating with experiments. The argument to give up the most powerful scientific method to study one of the hardest problems we confront is laughable.
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  9.  9
    People's Preferences for Inequality Respond Instantly to Changes in Status: A Simulated Society Experiment of Conflict Between the Rich and the Poor.Heidi A. Vuletich, Kurt Gray & B. Keith Payne - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (6):e13306.
    Most people in the United States agree they want some income inequality but debate exactly how much is fair. High‐status people generally prefer more inequality than low‐status individuals. Here we examine how much preferences for inequality are (or are not) driven by self‐interest. Past work has generally investigated this idea in two ways: The first is by stratifying preferences by income, and the second is by randomly assigning financial status within lab‐constructed scenarios. In this paper, we develop a method that (...)
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