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Barbara A. Koenig [30]Barbara Koenig [6]
  1.  57
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  2.  36
    Introduction: Sharing Data in a Medical Information Commons.Amy L. McGuire, Mary A. Majumder, Angela G. Villanueva, Jessica Bardill, Juli M. Bollinger, Eric Boerwinkle, Tania Bubela, Patricia A. Deverka, Barbara J. Evans, Nanibaa' A. Garrison, David Glazer, Melissa M. Goldstein, Henry T. Greely, Scott D. Kahn, Bartha M. Knoppers, Barbara A. Koenig, J. Mark Lambright, John E. Mattison, Christopher O'Donnell, Arti K. Rai, Laura L. Rodriguez, Tania Simoncelli, Sharon F. Terry, Adrian M. Thorogood, Michael S. Watson, John T. Wilbanks & Robert Cook-Deegan - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):12-20.
    Drawing on a landscape analysis of existing data-sharing initiatives, in-depth interviews with expert stakeholders, and public deliberations with community advisory panels across the U.S., we describe features of the evolving medical information commons. We identify participant-centricity and trustworthiness as the most important features of an MIC and discuss the implications for those seeking to create a sustainable, useful, and widely available collection of linked resources for research and other purposes.
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  3.  7
    The Role of Participants in a Medical Information Commons.Mary A. Majumder, Juli M. Bollinger, Angela G. Villanueva, Patricia A. Deverka & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):51-61.
    Meaningful participant engagement has been identified as a key contributor to the success of efforts to share data via a “Medical Information Commons”. We present findings from expert stakeholder interviews aimed at understanding barriers to engagement and the appropriate role of MIC participants. Although most interviewees supported engagement, they distinguished between individual versus collective forms. They also noted challenges including representation and perceived inefficiency, prompting reflection on political aspects of engagement and efficiency concerns.
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  4.  10
    Have We Asked Too Much of Consent?Barbara A. Koenig - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (4):33-34.
  5.  8
    Characterizing the Biomedical Data-Sharing Landscape.Angela G. Villanueva, Robert Cook-Deegan, Barbara A. Koenig, Patricia A. Deverka, Erika Versalovic, Amy L. McGuire & Mary A. Majumder - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):21-30.
    Advances in technologies and biomedical informatics have expanded capacity to generate and share biomedical data. With a lens on genomic data, we present a typology characterizing the data-sharing landscape in biomedical research to advance understanding of the key stakeholders and existing data-sharing practices. The typology highlights the diversity of data-sharing efforts and facilitators and reveals how novel data-sharing efforts are challenging existing norms regarding the role of individuals whom the data describe.
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  6.  23
    Hopeful and Concerned: Public Input on Building a Trustworthy Medical Information Commons.Patricia A. Deverka, Dierdre Gilmore, Jennifer Richmond, Zachary Smith, Rikki Mangrum, Barbara A. Koenig, Robert Cook-Deegan, Angela G. Villanueva, Mary A. Majumder & Amy L. McGuire - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):70-87.
    A medical information commons is a networked data environment utilized for research and clinical applications. At three deliberations across the U.S., we engaged 75 adults in two-day facilitated discussions on the ethical and social issues inherent to sharing data with an MIC. Deliberants made recommendations regarding opt-in consent, transparent data policies, public representation on MIC governing boards, and strict data security and privacy protection. Community engagement is critical to earning the public's trust.
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  7.  29
    Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
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  8.  25
    Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies.Josephine Johnston, John D. Lantos, Aaron Goldenberg, Flavia Chen, Erik Parens & Barbara A. Koenig - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S2-S6.
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  9.  33
    Accounting for Culture in Globalized Bioethics.Patricia Marshall & Barbara Koenig - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):252-266.
    As we look to the future in a world with porous borders and boundaries transgressed by technologies, an inevitable question is:Can there be a single, global bioethics? Intimately intertwined with this question is a second one: How might a global bioethics account for profound - and constantly transforming - sources of cultural difference? Can a uniform, global bioethics be relevant cross-culturally? These are not simple questions, rather, a multi-dimensional answer is required. It is important to distinguish between two meanings of (...)
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  10.  23
    Accounting for Culture in a Globalized Bioethics.Patricia Marshall & Barbara Koenig - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):252-266.
    As we look to the future in a world with porous borders and boundaries transgressed by technologies, an inevitable question is:Can there be a single, global bioethics? Intimately intertwined with this question is a second one: How might a global bioethics account for profound - and constantly transforming - sources of cultural difference? Can a uniform, global bioethics be relevant cross-culturally? These are not simple questions, rather, a multi-dimensional answer is required. It is important to distinguish between two meanings of (...)
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  11.  8
    If you build it, they will come: unintended future uses of organised health data collections.Kieran C. O’Doherty, Emily Christofides, Jeffery Yen, Heidi Beate Bentzen, Wylie Burke, Nina Hallowell, Barbara A. Koenig & Donald J. Willison - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):54.
    Health research increasingly relies on organized collections of health data and biological samples. There are many types of sample and data collections that are used for health research, though these are collected for many purposes, not all of which are health-related. These collections exist under different jurisdictional and regulatory arrangements and include: 1) Population biobanks, cohort studies, and genome databases 2) Clinical and public health data 3) Direct-to-consumer genetic testing 4) Social media 5) Fitness trackers, health apps, and biometric data (...)
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  12.  15
    Preferences Regarding Return of Genomic Results to Relatives of Research Participants, Including After Participant Death: Empirical Results From a Cancer Biobank.Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf, Kari G. Chaffee, Marguerite E. Robinson, Deborah R. Gordon, Noralane M. Lindor & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):464-475.
    Data are lacking with regard to participants' perspectives on return of genetic research results to relatives, including after the participant's death. This paper reports descriptive results from 3,630 survey respondents: 464 participants in a pancreatic cancer biobank, 1,439 family registry participants, and 1,727 healthy individuals. Our findings indicate that most participants would feel obligated to share their results with blood relatives while alive and would want results to be shared with relatives after their death.
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  13.  50
    The Difference That Culture Can Make in End-of-Life Decisionmaking.H. Eugene Hern, Barbara A. Koenig, Lisa Jean Moore & Patricia A. Marshall - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):27-40.
    Cultural difference has been largely ignored within bioethics, particularly within the end-of-life discourses and practices that have developed over the past two decades in the U.S. healthcare system. Yet how should culturebe taken into account?
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  14.  13
    Should Researchers Offer Results to Family Members of Cancer Biobank Participants? A Mixed-Methods Study of Proband and Family Preferences.Deborah R. Gordon, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Marguerite Robinson, Wesley O. Petersen, Jason S. Egginton, Kari G. Chaffee, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):1-22.
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  15.  23
    Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies.Josephine Johnston, John D. Lantos, Aaron Goldenberg, Flavia Chen, Erik Parens, Barbara A. Koenig, Members of the Nsight Ethics & Policy Advisory Board - forthcoming - Zygon.
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  16.  21
    Understanding the Practice of Ethics Consultation: Results of an Ethnographic Multi-Site Study.Susan E. Kelly, Patricia A. Marshall, Lee M. Sanders, Thomas A. Raffin & Barbara A. Koenig - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (2):136-149.
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  17.  13
    Linking Broad Consent to Biobank Governance: Support From a Deliberative Public Engagement in California.Sarah B. Garrett, Daniel Dohan & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):56-57.
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  18.  23
    Pragmatic Tools for Sharing Genomic Research Results with the Relatives of Living and Deceased Research Participants.Susan M. Wolf, Emily Scholtes, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):87-109.
    Returning genomic research results to family members raises complex questions. Genomic research on life-limiting conditions such as cancer, and research involving storage and reanalysis of data and specimens long into the future, makes these questions pressing. This author group, funded by an NIH grant, published consensus recommendations presenting a framework. This follow-up paper offers concrete guidance and tools for implementation. The group collected and analyzed relevant documents and guidance, including tools from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium. The authors then (...)
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  19.  20
    Understanding Variations in Secondary Findings Reporting Practices Across U.S. Genome Sequencing Laboratories.Sara L. Ackerman & Barbara A. Koenig - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (1):48-57.
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  20.  32
    AJOB Empirical Bioethics: A Home for Empirical Bioethics Scholarship.Chris Feudtner, Jeremy Sugarman, Barbara A. Koenig, Peter A. Ubel, Richard F. Ittenbach, Laura Weiss Roberts & Laurence B. McCullough - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (1):1-2.
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  21.  30
    Cultural Aspects of Nondisclosure.Celia J. Orona, Barbara A. Koenig & Anne J. Davis - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (3):338.
    A basic assumption in current western medicine is that good healthcare involves informed choices. Indeed, making informed choices is not only viewed as “good practice” but a right to which each individual is entitled, a perspective only recently developed in the medical field.Moreover, in the case of ethical decisions, much of the discussion on the role of the family is cast within the autonomy paradigm of contemporary bioethics; that is, family members provide emotional support but do not make decisions for (...)
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  22.  8
    Mapping the Ethics of Translational Genomics: Situating Return of Results and Navigating the Research‐Clinical Divide.Susan M. Wolf, Wylie Burke & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):486-501.
    Both bioethics and law have governed human genomics by distinguishing research from clinical practice. Yet the rise of translational genomics now makes this traditional dichotomy inadequate. This paper pioneers a new approach to the ethics of translational genomics. It maps the full range of ethical approaches needed, proposes a “layered” approach to determining the ethics framework for projects combining research and clinical care, and clarifies the key role that return of results can play in advancing translation.
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  23.  10
    Incidental Findings in CT Colonography: Literature Review and Survey of Current Research Practice.Hassan Siddiki, J. G. Fletcher, Beth McFarland, Nora Dajani, Nicholas Orme, Barbara Koenig, Marguerite Strobel & Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):320-331.
    Incidental fndings of potential medical signifcance are seen in approximately 5-8 percent of asymptomatic subjects and 16 percent of symptomatic subjects participating in large computed tomography colonography studies, with the incidence varying further by CT acquisition technique. While most CTC research programs have a well-defned plan to detect and disclose IFs, such plans are largely communicated only verbally. Written consent documents should also inform subjects of how IFs of potential medical signifcance will be detected and reported in CTC research studies.
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  24.  7
    Why Not Grant Primacy to the Family?Barbara A. Koenig - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):33-34.
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  25. Anthropology and Bioethics.Barbara A. Koenig - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:68-76.
     
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  26.  24
    Dead Donors and the "Shortage" of Human Organs: Are We Missing the Point?Barbara A. Koenig - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):26 – 27.
  27.  3
    Public Involvement in the Governance of Population-Level Biomedical Research: Unresolved Questions and Future Directions.Sonja Erikainen, Phoebe Friesen, Leah Rand, Karin Jongsma, Michael Dunn, Annie Sorbie, Matthew McCoy, Jessica Bell, Michael Burgess, Haidan Chen, Vicky Chico, Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Julie Darbyshire, Rebecca Dawson, Andrew Evans, Nick Fahy, Teresa Finlay, Lucy Frith, Aaron Goldenberg, Lisa Hinton, Nils Hoppe, Nigel Hughes, Barbara Koenig, Sapfo Lignou, Michelle McGowan, Michael Parker, Barbara Prainsack, Mahsa Shabani, Ciara Staunton, Rachel Thompson, Kinga Varnai, Effy Vayena, Oli Williams, Max Williamson, Sarah Chan & Mark Sheehan - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106530.
    Population-level biomedical research offers new opportunities to improve population health, but also raises new challenges to traditional systems of research governance and ethical oversight. Partly in response to these challenges, various models of public involvement in research are being introduced. Yet, the ways in which public involvement should meet governance challenges are not well understood. We conducted a qualitative study with 36 experts and stakeholders using the World Café method to identify key governance challenges and explore how public involvement can (...)
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  28. The Media and Behavioral Genetics: Alternatives Coexisting with Addiction Genetics.Barbara A. Koenig, Rachel Hammer, Jennifer B. McCormick, Jenny Ostergren & Molly J. Dingel - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (4):459-486.
    To understand public discourse in the United States on genetic causation of behavioral disorders, we analyzed media representations of genetic research on addiction published between 1990 and 2010. We conclude first that the media simplistically represent biological bases of addiction and willpower as being mutually exclusive: behaviors are either genetically determined, or they are a choice. Second, most articles provide only cursory or no treatment of the environmental contribution. A media focus on genetics directs attention away from environmental factors. Rhetorically, (...)
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  29.  8
    The Power (and Limits) of Proximity.Barbara A. Koenig - 1996 - Hastings Center Report 26 (6):30-32.
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  30.  29
    What Can Anthropology Contribute to the Terri Schiavo Debate?Barbara Koenig - 2006 - Bioethics Examiner 9.
  31.  14
    Systematic Review of Ethics Consultation: A Route to Curriculum Development in Post-Graduate Medical Education.Paul S. Mueller & Barbara A. Koenig - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):21 – 23.
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  32. Researcher Perspectives on Ethical Considerations in Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation Trials.Katrina A. Muñoz, Kristin Kostick, Clarissa Sanchez, Lavina Kalwani, Laura Torgerson, Rebecca Hsu, Demetrio Sierra-Mercado, Jill O. Robinson, Simon Outram, Barbara A. Koenig, Stacey Pereira, Amy McGuire, Peter Zuk & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  33.  4
    Letter to the Editor.Jeannie Pasacreta, Nancy Press, Jennifer Fishman & Barbara Koenig - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (2):161-163.
  34.  3
    Researcher Perspectives on Data Sharing in Deep Brain Stimulation.Peter Zuk, Clarissa E. Sanchez, Kristin Kostick, Laura Torgerson, Katrina A. Muñoz, Rebecca Hsu, Lavina Kalwani, Demetrio Sierra-Mercado, Jill O. Robinson, Simon Outram, Barbara A. Koenig, Stacey Pereira, Amy L. McGuire & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    The expansion of research on deep brain stimulation and adaptive DBS raises important neuroethics and policy questions related to data sharing. However, there has been little empirical research on the perspectives of experts developing these technologies. We conducted semi-structured, open-ended interviews with aDBS researchers regarding their data sharing practices and their perspectives on ethical and policy issues related to sharing. Researchers expressed support for and a commitment to sharing, with most saying that they were either sharing their data or would (...)
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