34 found
Order:
  1.  74
    “What” and “where” in spatial language and spatial cognition.Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):217-238.
    Fundamental to spatial knowledge in all species are the representations underlying object recognition, object search, and navigation through space. But what sets humans apart from other species is our ability to express spatial experience through language. This target article explores the language ofobjectsandplaces, asking what geometric properties are preserved in the representations underlying object nouns and spatial prepositions in English. Evidence from these two aspects of language suggests there are significant differences in the geometric richness with which objects and places (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  2.  20
    Early map use as an unlearned ability.Barbara Landau - 1986 - Cognition 22 (3):201-223.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  3.  52
    Naming in young children: a dumb attentional mechanism?Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones & Barbara Landau - 1996 - Cognition 60 (2):143-171.
  4. Starting at the end: the importance of goals in spatial language.Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):1-33.
  5. Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths.Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not fully rooted (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6. Spatial language and spatial representation: a cross-linguistic comparison.Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher - 2001 - Cognition 81 (3):171-208.
  7.  40
    Whence and whither in spatial language and spatial cognition?Barbara Landau & Ray Jackendoff - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):255-265.
  8.  17
    Spatial representation of objects in the young blind child.Barbara Landau - 1991 - Cognition 38 (2):145-178.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  9.  32
    Using instruments to understand argument structure: Evidence for gradient representation.Lilia Rissman, Kyle Rawlins & Barbara Landau - 2015 - Cognition 142 (C):266-290.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  10.  38
    Interaction between language and vision: It’s momentary, abstract, and it develops.Banchiamlack Dessalegn & Barbara Landau - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):331-344.
  11.  40
    A phone in a basket looks like a knife in a cup: Role-filler independence in visual processing.Alon Hafri, Michael Bonner, Barbara Landau & Chaz Firestone - 2024 - Open Mind.
    When a piece of fruit is in a bowl, and the bowl is on a table, we appreciate not only the individual objects and their features, but also the relations containment and support, which abstract away from the particular objects involved. Independent representation of roles (e.g., containers vs. supporters) and “fillers” of those roles (e.g., bowls vs. cups, tables vs. chairs) is a core principle of language and higherlevel reasoning. But does such role-filler independence also arise in automatic visual processing? (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  33
    Containment and Support: Core and Complexity in Spatial Language Learning.Barbara Landau, Kristen Johannes, Dimitrios Skordos & Anna Papafragou - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S4):748-779.
    Containment and support have traditionally been assumed to represent universal conceptual foundations for spatial terms. This assumption can be challenged, however: English in and on are applied across a surprisingly broad range of exemplars, and comparable terms in other languages show significant variation in their application. We propose that the broad domains of both containment and support have internal structure that reflects different subtypes, that this structure is reflected in basic spatial term usage across languages, and that it constrains children's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  20
    Update on “What” and “Where” in Spatial Language: A New Division of Labor for Spatial Terms.Barbara Landau - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S2):321-350.
    In this article, I revisit Landau and Jackendoff's () paper, “What and where in spatial language and spatial cognition,” proposing a friendly amendment and reformulation. The original paper emphasized the distinct geometries that are engaged when objects are represented as members of object kinds, versus when they are represented as figure and ground in spatial expressions. We provided empirical and theoretical arguments for the link between these distinct representations in spatial language and their accompanying nonlinguistic neural representations, emphasizing the “what” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  12
    Learning Simple Spatial Terms: Core and More.Barbara Landau - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (1):91-114.
    Landau also pushes the role of syntax and its mapping to semantics in learning what some would consider “easy words”—the simplest spatial prepositions in English, in and on. Taking as a starting point that the syntactic distribution of a word is a reflex of its meaning, Landau shows that careful study of how children and adults linguistically encode a range of containment and support configurations reveals a special status for “core” configurations in each domain. She proposes that children come to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  20
    Characterizing the Details of Spatial Construction: Cognitive Constraints and Variability.Amy Lynne Shelton, E. Emory Davis, Cathryn S. Cortesa, Jonathan D. Jones, Gregory D. Hager, Sanjeev Khudanpur & Barbara Landau - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (1):e13081.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 1, January 2022.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  25
    Dissociating intuitive physics from intuitive psychology: Evidence from Williams syndrome.Frederik S. Kamps, Joshua B. Julian, Peter Battaglia, Barbara Landau, Nancy Kanwisher & Daniel D. Dilks - 2017 - Cognition 168 (C):146-153.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  45
    The effects of spatial language on spatial representation: Setting some boundaries.Edward Munnich & Barbara Landau - 2003 - In Dedre Getner & Susan Goldin-Meadow (eds.), Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought. MIT Press. pp. 113--155.
  18.  13
    How does a blind person see? Developmental change in applying visual verbs to agents with disabilities.Giulia V. Elli, Marina Bedny & Barbara Landau - 2021 - Cognition 212 (C):104683.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  52
    Concepts, the lexicon and acquisition: Fodor's new challenge.Barbara Landau - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (2-3):319-326.
  20.  12
    The importance of lexical verbs in the acquisition of spatial prepositions: The case of in and on.Kristen Johannes, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau - 2016 - Cognition 157 (C):174-189.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  18
    Editor's Introduction: 2017 Rumelhart Prize Issue Honoring Lila R. Gleitman.Barbara Landau - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (1):7-21.
    Landau introduces the volume with a selective review of Lila R. Gleitman’s intellectual history, emphasizing the theoretical roots of her research. These include influences of Zellig Harris and Noam Chomsky, her creation of “The Great Verb Game” (which paved the way for the theory of syntactic bootstrapping), the importance of natural “deprivation” experiments, and how they shed light on understanding what the data for learning really might be, and her life as an empiricist, driven by data to nativist conclusions. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  16
    Object recognition with severe spatial deficits in Williams syndrome: sparing and breakdown.Barbara Landau, James E. Hoffman & Nicole Kurz - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):483-510.
  23.  25
    Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist.Emma Gregory, Michael McCloskey & Barbara Landau - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  24.  33
    Geometric and featural systems, separable and combined: Evidence from reorientation in people with Williams syndrome.Katrina Ferrara & Barbara Landau - 2015 - Cognition 144 (C):123-133.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Ex 0.Paul Bertelson, Ruth M. J. Byrne, Stanislas Dehaene, Ruma Falk, Gerd Gigerenzer, Klaus Hug, Phillip N. Johnson-Laird, Susan Jones, Peter W. Jusczyk & Barbara Landau - 1992 - Cognition 43:2.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  37
    Spatial Language and the Embedded Listener Model in Parents’ Input to Children.Katrina Ferrara, Malena Silva, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):1877-1910.
    Language is a collaborative act: To communicate successfully, speakers must generate utterances that are not only semantically valid but also sensitive to the knowledge state of the listener. Such sensitivity could reflect the use of an “embedded listener model,” where speakers choose utterances on the basis of an internal model of the listener's conceptual and linguistic knowledge. In this study, we ask whether parents’ spatial descriptions incorporate an embedded listener model that reflects their children's understanding of spatial relations and spatial (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  21
    What is coded in parietal representations?Ray Jackendoff & Barbara Landau - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):211-212.
  28. Early experience and cognitive organization.Barbara Landau - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  8
    Innate Knowledge.Barbara Landau - 2017 - In William Bechtel & George Graham (eds.), A Companion to Cognitive Science. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 576–589.
    At the heart of cognitive science lie two problems: the nature of our knowledge and how it emerges. For many centuries, these issues were the province of philosophers only. Nativists such as René Descartes argued that much of our knowledge was innate, driven by the character of the human mind and only indirectly by the nature of the particular events we might experience. By contrast, empiricists such as John Locke argued that very little of our knowledge was innate; rather, he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  16
    New failures to learn.Barbara Landau - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):660-661.
  31.  30
    Reinventing a broken wheel.Barbara Landau - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):623-624.
    Barsalou is right in arguing that perception has been unduly neglected in theories of concept formation. However, the theory he proposes is a weaker version of the classical empirical hypothesis about the relationship between sensation, perception, and concepts. It is weaker because it provides no principled basis for choosing the elementary components of perception. Furthermore, the proposed mechanism of concept formation, growth and development – simulation – is essentially equivalent to the notion of a concept, frame, or theory, and therefore (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  45
    Parts of visual shape as primitives for categorization.Manish Singh & Barbara Landau - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):36-37.
    Converging psychophysical evidence suggests that the human visual system parses shapes into component parts for the purposes of object recognition. We examine the Schyns et al. claim of “creation” of features in light of recent work on part-based representations of visual shape, particularly the perceptual rules that human vision uses to parse shapes.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  14
    New Learning of Music after Bilateral Medial Temporal Lobe Damage: Evidence from an Amnesic Patient.Jussi Valtonen, Emma Gregory, Barbara Landau & Michael McCloskey - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  34. ELIZABETH S. SPELKE (MIT) Children's use of geometry and landmarks to reorient in an open space, 119±148 JENNY R. SAFFRAN (University of Wisconsin±Madison) Words in a sea of sounds: the output of infant statistical learning, 149±169 Brief articles. [REVIEW]Marc Pomplun, Eyal M. Reingold, Jiye Shen, Vittorio Girotto, Markus Kemmelmeier, Dan Sperber, Jean-Baptiste van der Henst, Edward Munnich, Barbara Landau & Barbara Anne Dosher - 2001 - Cognition 81 (249):249-251.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations