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  1.  30
    Echo objects: the cognitive work of images.Barbara Maria Stafford - 2007 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Barbara Stafford is at the forefront of a growing movement that calls for the humanities to confront the brain’s material realities. In Echo Objects she argues that humanists should seize upon the exciting neuroscientific discoveries that are illuminating the underpinnings of cultural objects. In turn, she contends, brain scientists could enrich their investigations of mental activity by incorporating phenomenological considerations—particularly the intricate ways that images focus intentional behavior and allow us to feel thought. This, then, is a book for both (...)
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  2.  11
    Thoughts Not Our Own.Barbara Maria Stafford - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (2-3):275-293.
    There are now many important contributions to the scientific study of the brain-mind continuum. These results come both from research into non-ordinary states of consciousness and into the brain's intrinsic, largely unconscious mechanisms. The larger potential of such investigations consists precisely in making the parameters of our cognitive system apparent. But they also reveal the socio-cultural uses to which these parameters are currently, or in the foreseeable future, being applied. This article wrestles with that fact. Specifically, it examines the implications (...)
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  3.  12
    A Field Guide to a New Meta-Field: Bridging the Humanities-Neurosciences Divide.Barbara Maria Stafford (ed.) - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    Barbara Stafford is a pioneering art historian whose research has long helped to bridge the divide between the humanities and cognitive sciences. In _A Field Guide to a New Meta-Field_, she marshals a distinguished group of thinkers to forge a ground-breaking dialogue between the emerging brain sciences, the liberal arts, and social sciences. Stafford’s book examines meaning and mental function from this dual experimental perspective. The wide-ranging essays included here—from Frank Echenhofer’s foray into shamanist hallucinogenic visions to David Bashwiner’s analysis (...)
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  4.  8
    Guest editorial. Present image, past text, post word: Educating the late modern citizen.Barbara Maria Stafford - 1992 - Semiotica 91 (3-4):195-198.
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  5.  51
    Reconceiving the warburg library as a working museum of the mind.Barbara Maria Stafford - 2012 - Common Knowledge 18 (1):180-187.
    Received opinion holds that it would be more efficient, hence more economical, to compress and thus dissolve the holdings of the Warburg Institute Library into an overarching university library system. This essay argues two points: first, that we should not be automatically persuaded by the popular and largely unexamined goal of efficiency; and second, that the Library indeed requires its own space but that that space must now be reconceived. In line with Aby Warburg's belief that the past should engage (...)
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  6.  7
    The Enlightenment “Catholization” of Projective Technology: Theurgy and the Media Origins of Art.Barbara Maria Stafford - 2008 - In Jan Lazardzig, Ludger Schwarte & Helmar Schramm (eds.), Theatrum Scientiarum - English Edition, Volume 2, Instruments in Art and Science: On the Architectonics of Cultural Boundaries in the 17th Century. De Gruyter. pp. 127-151.
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  7.  10
    Vizualizace vědění od osvícenství k postmoderně.Barbara Maria Stafford - 2008 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 30 (2):5-32.
    In her article, Barbara M. Staff ord argues for the conception of literacy that would encompass visual skills besides the traditional emphasis on verbal competence. Image itself is important, not merely the information it may convey. Moreover, a more extens ive notion of education is necessitated by the process of radical perceptual and conceptual changes that have been occurring since the Enlightenment and are all-pervasive in Postmodernism. The new-found power and ubiquity of images needs to be recogn ized in order (...)
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