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    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):279-293.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters approved Proposition 69, “The DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime, and Innocence Protection Act” by a margin of approximately 60 to 40 percent. Given the limited amount of information provided to voters during the initiative process, it is unclear how many of the yea-sayers were apprised of the full implications of this measure. Indeed, by voting “yes” on Proposition 69, California has elected to house the most radical and costly state criminal DNA database in the country. (...)
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    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):279-293.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters elected to radically expand their state criminal DNA database through the passage of Proposition 69. The approved ballot initiative authorized DNA collection and retention from all felons, any individuals with past felony convictions – including juveniles – and, beginning in 2009, all adults arrested for any felony offense. This dramatic database expansion threatens civil liberties and establishes a dangerous precedent for U.S. criminal databases.
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    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):199-213.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters elected to radically expand their state criminal DNA database through the passage of Proposition 69. The approved ballot initiative authorized DNA collection and retention from all felons, any individuals with past felony convictions – including juveniles – and, beginning in 2009, all adults arrested for any felony offense. This dramatic database expansion threatens civil liberties and establishes a dangerous precedent for U.S. criminal databases.
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