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Bart Gruzalski [28]Bart Karl Gruzalski [1]Bart K. Gruzalski [1]
  1.  25
    Foreseeable Consequence Utilitarianism.Bart Gruzalski - 1981 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 59 (2):163 – 176.
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  2.  24
    Parfit's Impact on Utilitarianism.Bart Gruzalski - 1986 - Ethics 96 (4):760-783.
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  3. 10. Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality (Pp. 182-184).Kevin A. Ameriks, Tad R. Brennan, Ann E. Cudd, Kirk A. Greer, Bart Gruzalski, David P. McCabe, John McCumber, Richard Sherlock & Ira J. Singer - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1).
     
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  4.  91
    Killing by Letting Die.Bart Gruzalski - 1981 - Mind 90 (357):91-98.
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  5.  24
    Gandhi's Challenge To Our Paradigm Of Justifiable Violence.Bart Gruzalski - 2000 - The Acorn 10 (2):5-18.
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  6.  40
    Two Accounts of Our Obligations to Respect Persons.Bart Gruzalski - 1982 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:77-89.
  7.  28
    Ethics of Consumption.Bart Gruzalski - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (3):329-332.
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  8.  20
    Utilitarian Generalization, Competing Descriptions, and the Behavior of Others.Bart Gruzalski - 1981 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):487 - 504.
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  9.  8
    The Ability To Be Moral Fails To Show That Humans Are More Valuable Than Nonhuman Animals.Bart Gruzalski - 2004 - Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):15.
    Most philosophers believe that humans have far greater moral worth than nonhuman animals. This consensus position invites the following question: What characteristic or group of characteristics of human beings differentiates us from nonhuman animals so that we have greater moral worth than nonhuman animals? Philosophers have offered a number of characteristics that allegedly show human beings to be superior to nonhuman animals. At the top of the list we find thinking and the ability to be rational. Further down the list (...)
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  10.  9
    The Defeat of Utilitarian Generalization.Bart Gruzalski - 1982 - Ethics 93 (1):22-38.
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  11.  1
    Two Accounts of Our Obligations to Respect Persons.Bart Gruzalski - 1982 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:77-89.
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  12.  23
    Mary Anne Warren, Moral Status: Obligations to Persons and Other Living Things:Moral Status: Obligations to Persons and Other Living Things.Bart Gruzalski - 2000 - Ethics 110 (3):645-649.
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  13.  15
    Parfit's Unified Theory of Morality.Bart Gruzalski - 1986 - Philosophical Studies 50 (1):143 - 152.
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  14.  6
    Taking Full Responsibility for Causing Patients to Die.Bart Gruzalski - 1980 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 2:93-101.
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  15.  14
    Gandhi's Contributions to Environmental Thought and Action.Bart Gruzalski - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (3):227-242.
    Vinay Lal raises doubts about Gandhi’s status as an environmentalist but argues that Gandhi had “a profoundly ecological view of life.” I take issue with Lal’s claims and, to set the record straight, describe Gandhi’s contributions to environmental though and action. When we look at the aims of contemporary environmental spokespersons and activists, Gandhian themes are dominant. Gandhian biocentrism and Gandhi’s recommendation not to harm even nonsentient life unnecessarily are familiar in contemporary environmental thinking. Gandhian non-violence is both a technique (...)
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  16.  2
    Gandhi’s Challenge To Our Paradigm Of Justifiable Violence.Bart Gruzalski - 2000 - Acorn 10 (2):5-18.
  17.  2
    Article Review of The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism, Philosophy.Bart Gruzalski - unknown
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  18.  9
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Kevin A. Ameriks, Tad Brennan, Ann E. Cudd, Kirk A. Greer, Bart Gruzalski, David P. McCabe, John McCumber, Richard Sherlock & Ira J. Singer - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1):205-212.
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  19.  7
    Beyond Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development.Bart Gruzalski - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (1):93-96.
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  20.  4
    Four Aspects of Buddhist Ethics Unfamiliar in the West.Bart K. Gruzalski - 1996 - In Ninian Smart & B. Srinivasa Murthy (eds.), East-West Encounters in Philosophy and Religion. Long Beach Publications.
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  21.  5
    Healing the Ills of Unemployment, Societal Breakdown, and Ecological Degradation.Bart Gruzalski - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (3):22-27.
    In this paper I describe Gandhi’s vision for a way of life that would be an essential part of any sustainable solution to worldwide problems of unemployment, societal breakdown and ecological degradation. Gandhi’s vision included a communitarian lifestyle of simplicity and non-accumulation in which agriculture would be supported by cottage industries using appropriate technologies (e.g., spinning). Assuming obligations to future generations, Gandhi’s proposal highlights the degree to which our First-World lifestyle is morally impermissible. One objection to this criticism of our (...)
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  22.  5
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]by Scott A. Anderson, Jeremy D. Bendik‐Keymer, Samuel Black, Chad M. Cyrenne, Bart Gruzalski, Mark P. Jenkins, John Morrow, Michael A. Neblo, Tommie Shelby & James Stacey Taylor - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):421-427.
  23.  1
    Some Implications of Utilitarianism for Practical Ethics: The Case Against the Military Response to Terrorism.Bart Gruzalski - 2006 - In Henry West (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Mill's Utilitarianism. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 249--269.
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  24. Autonomy and the Orthodoxy of Human Superiority.Bart Gruzalski - 1996 - Between the Species 12 (1):3.
  25. Beyond Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development. [REVIEW]Bart Gruzalski - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (1):93-96.
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  26. Gandhi’s Contributions to Environmental Thought and Action.Bart Gruzalski - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (3):227-242.
    Vinay Lal raises doubts about Gandhi’s status as an environmentalist but argues that Gandhi had “a profoundly ecological view of life.” I take issue with Lal’s claims and, to set the record straight, describe Gandhi’s contributions to environmental though and action. When we look at the aims of contemporary environmental spokespersons and activists, Gandhian themes are dominant. Gandhian biocentrism and Gandhi’s recommendation not to harm even nonsentient life unnecessarily are familiar in contemporary environmental thinking. Gandhian non-violence is both a technique (...)
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  27. Healing the Ills of Unemployment, Societal Breakdown, and Ecological Degradation: Gandhi’s Vision for a Sustainable Way of Life.Bart Gruzalski - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (3):22-27.
    In this paper I describe Gandhi’s vision for a way of life that would be an essential part of any sustainable solution to worldwide problems of unemployment, societal breakdown and ecological degradation. Gandhi’s vision included a communitarian lifestyle of simplicity and non-accumulation in which agriculture would be supported by cottage industries using appropriate technologies. Assuming obligations to future generations, Gandhi’s proposal highlights the degree to which our First-World lifestyle is morally impermissible. One objection to this criticism of our First-World lifestyles (...)
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  28. Modern Philosophical Fragmentation Versus Vedānta and Plato.Bart Gruzalski - 2005 - In Ashok Vohra, Arvind Sharma & Mrinal Miri (eds.), Dharma, the Categorial Imperative. D.K. Printworld. pp. 349--362.
  29. Reply: The Instrumental Value of Autonomy.Bart Gruzalski - 1996 - Between the Species 12 (1):5.