Results for 'Batin Mikhail'

467 found
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  1.  60
    Elements of Moral Cognition: Rawls' Linguistic Analogy and the Cognitive Science of Moral and Legal Judgment.John Mikhail - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is the science of moral cognition usefully modelled on aspects of Universal Grammar? Are human beings born with an innate 'moral grammar' that causes them to analyse human action in terms of its moral structure, with just as little awareness as they analyse human speech in terms of its grammatical structure? Questions like these have been at the forefront of moral psychology ever since John Mikhail revived them in his influential work on the linguistic analogy and its implications for (...)
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  2. A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications.Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, J. I. N. Kang-Xing & John Mikhail - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (1):1–21.
    To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals' responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: (1) patterns of moral (...)
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  3.  25
    A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications.Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, R. Kang‐Xing Jin & John Mikhail - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (1):1-21.
    : To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals’ responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: patterns of moral (...)
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  4. Rawls' Linguistic Analogy.John M. Mikhail - 2000 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    The aim of the dissertation is to formulate a research program in moral cognition modeled on aspects of Universal Grammar and organized around three classic problems in moral epistemology: What constitutes moral knowledge? How is moral knowledge acquired? How is moral knowledge put to use? Drawing on the work of Rawls and Chomsky, a framework for investigating -- is proposed. The framework is defended against a range of philosophical objections and contrasted with the approach of developmentalists like Piaget and Kohlberg. (...)
     
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  5. Universal Moral Grammar: Theory, Evidence, and the Future.John Mikhail - 1912 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):143 –152.
    Scientists from various disciplines have begun to focus attention on the psychology and biology of human morality. One research program that has recently gained attention is universal moral grammar (UMG). UMG seeks to describe the nature and origin of moral knowledge by using concepts and models similar to those used in Chomsky's program in linguistics. This approach is thought to provide a fruitful perspective from which to investigate moral competence from computational, ontogenetic, behavioral, physiological and phylogenetic perspectives. In this article, (...)
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  6.  64
    Moral Grammar and Intuitive Jurisprudence: A Formal Model of Unconscious Moral and Legal Knowledge.John Mikhail - 2009 - In B. H. Ross, D. M. Bartels, C. W. Bauman, L. J. Skitka & D. L. Medin (eds.), Psychology of Learning and Motivation, Vol. 50: Moral Judgment and Decision Making. Academic Press.
    Could a computer be programmed to make moral judgments about cases of intentional harm and unreasonable risk that match those judgments people already make intuitively? If the human moral sense is an unconscious computational mechanism of some sort, as many cognitive scientists have suggested, then the answer should be yes. So too if the search for reflective equilibrium is a sound enterprise, since achieving this state of affairs requires demarcating a set of considered judgments, stating them as explanandum sentences, and (...)
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  7.  37
    Collection, Storage and Use of Blood Samples for Future Research: Views of Egyptian Patients Expressed in a Cross-Sectional Survey.A. Abou-Zeid, H. Silverman, M. Shehata, M. Shams, M. Elshabrawy, T. Hifnawy, S. A. Rahman, B. Galal, H. Sleem, N. Mikhail & N. Moharram - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):539-547.
    Objective To determine the attitudes of Egyptian patients regarding their participation in research and with the collection, storage and future use of blood samples for research purposes. Design Cross-sectional survey. Study population Adult Egyptian patients (n=600) at rural and urban hospitals and clinics. Results Less than half of the study population (44.3%) felt that informed consent forms should provide research participants the option to have their blood samples stored for future research. Of these participants, 39.9% thought that consent forms should (...)
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  8.  12
    The Mental Representation of Human Action.Sydney Levine, Alan M. Leslie & John Mikhail - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (4):1229-1264.
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  9.  19
    Any Animal Whatever? Harmful Battery and Its Elements as Building Blocks of Moral Cognition.John Mikhail - 2014 - Ethics 124 (4):750-786.
    This article argues that the key elements of the prima facie case of harmful battery may form critical building blocks of moral cognition in both humans and nonhuman animals. By contrast, at least some of the rules and representations presupposed by familiar justifications to battery appear to be uniquely human. The article also argues that many famous thought experiments in ethics and many influential experiments in moral psychology rely on harmful battery scenarios without acknowledging this fact or considering its theoretical (...)
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  10.  99
    Emotion, Neuroscience, and Law: A Comment on Darwin and Greene.John Mikhail - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):293-295.
    Darwin’s (1871/1981) observation that evolution has produced in us certain emotions responding to right and wrong conduct that lack any obvious basis in individual utility is a useful springboard from which to clarify the role of emotion in moral judgment. The problem is whether a certain class of moral judgment is “constituted” or “driven by” emotion (Greene, 2008, p. 108) or merely correlated with emotion while being generated by unconscious computations (e.g., Huebner, Dwyer, & Hauser, 2008). With one exception, all (...)
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  11.  43
    Moral Heuristics or Moral Competence? Reflections on Sunstein.John Mikhail - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):557-558.
    By focusing on mistaken judgments, Sunstein provides a theory of performance errors without a theory of moral competence. Additionally, Sunstein's objections to thought experiments like the footbridge and trolley problems are unsound. Exotic and unfamiliar stimuli are used in theory construction throughout the cognitive sciences, and these problems enable us to uncover the implicit structure of our moral intuitions.
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  12.  35
    Your Theory of the Evolution of Morality Depends Upon Your Theory of Morality.David Kirkby, Wolfram Hinzen & John Mikhail - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):94-95.
    Baumard et al. attribute to humans a sense of fairness. However, the properties of this sense are so underspecified that the evolutionary account offered is not well-motivated. We contrast this with the framework of Universal Moral Grammar, which has sought a descriptively adequate account of the structure of the moral domain as a precondition for understanding the evolution of morality.
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  13.  49
    Moral Cognition and Computational Theory.John Mikhail - 2008 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology Volume 3. MIT Press.
    In this comment on Joshua Greene's essay, The Secret Joke of Kant's Soul, I argue that a notable weakness of Greene's approach to moral psychology is its neglect of computational theory. A central problem moral cognition must solve is to recognize (i.e., compute representations of) the deontic status of human acts and omissions. How do people actually do this? What is the theory which explains their practice?
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  14.  37
    The Poverty of the Moral Stimulus.John Mikhail - 2008 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology Volume 1. MIT Press.
    One of the most influential arguments in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science is Chomsky's argument from the poverty of the stimulus. In this response to an essay by Chandra Sripada, I defend an analogous argument from the poverty of the moral stimulus. I argue that Sripada's criticism of moral nativism appears to rest on the mistaken assumption that the learning target in moral cognition consists of a series of simple imperatives, such as "share your toys" or "don't hit other children." (...)
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  15.  18
    Churchland, Patricia S. Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality.Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2011. Pp. 273. $24.95. [REVIEW]John Mikhail - 2013 - Ethics 123 (2):354-356.
  16. A Case for the Moral Organ?John Mikhail - manuscript
     
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  17.  12
    The Socio-Political Symbols in the Ifugao Epic “Hudhud of Dinulawan and Bugan at Gonhadan”.Judith J. Batin - 2015 - Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 7 (1).
    In 2001, UNESCO proclaimed the Ifugao epic hudhud as one of the 19 masterpieces of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity. This study is focused on the traditional marriage rite of the wealthy Ifugao people in the ancient times as a reflection of the socio-political culture and tradition. This study aims to answer: What are the socio-political symbols reflected in the narrative structure and characterization of the epic? How does the traditional marriage define the socio-political stratification of the Ifugao (...)
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  18.  33
    Plucking the Mask of Mystery From its Face: Jurisprudence and H.L.A. Hart.John Mikhail - manuscript
    Until recently, little was known of H.L.A. Hart’s private life. That has now changed with the publication of Nicola Lacey’s A Life of H.L.A. Hart: The Nightmare and the Noble Dream. Drawing on Hart’s notebooks and correspondence, Lacey paints an illuminating portrait of Hart, which reveals that despite his public success he struggled with internal perplexities, including his sexual orientation, Jewish identity, intellectual insecurity, and unconventional marriage. Yet, as critics have noted, the connection between these revelations and the development of (...)
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  19.  11
    Moral Grammar and Human Rights.John Mikhail - 2012 - In Ryan Goodman, Derek Jinks & Andrew K. Woods (eds.), Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights. Oup Usa. pp. 160.
  20.  14
    Scottish Common Sense and Nineteenth-Century American Law: A Critical Appraisal.John Mikhail - manuscript
    In her insightful and stimulating article, The Mind of a Moral Agent, Professor Susanna Blumenthal traces the influence of Scottish Common Sense philosophy on early American law. Among other things, Blumenthal argues that the basic model of moral agency upon which early American jurists relied, which drew heavily from Common Sense philosophers like Thomas Reid, generated certain paradoxical conclusions about legal responsibility that later generations were forced to confront. "Having cast their lot with the Common Sense philosophers in the "formative (...)
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  21.  6
    The Virtual Linguistics.Pronin Mikhail - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:309-317.
    In the report are considered initial theses – philosophical ideas and paradigmatic representations, - for formation of a new scientific direction – virtual linguistics: virtual philosophy of linguistics. Focus of interests of virtual linguistics lays in studying attitudes of the internal (virtual) human and language as virtual object of the internal (virtual) human. For ordinary consciousness virtual - concerning computers. It only is partly true. The virtualistic as the paradigmatic direction is developed in Russia since 80th years of the last (...)
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  22.  2
    Notes on the" Ahl Al-Dīwān": The Arab-Egyptian Army of the Seventh Through the Ninth Centuries CE.Maged Sa Mikhail - 2008 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 128 (2):273-284.
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  23.  1
    Major Themes in Modern Arabic Thought: An Anthology.Mona N. Mikhail & Trevor Le Gassick - 1982 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 102 (4):671.
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  24. Hydrated Portland Cement—Surface Area in Relation to Pore Structure.Rsh Mikhail - 1965 - In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship. pp. 7--251.
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  25. Some Observations Concerning Edibles in Late Antique and Early Islamic Egypt.M. S. A. Mikhail - 2000 - Byzantion 70 (1):105-121.
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  26.  38
    Ludwig Feuerbach's Conception of the Religious Alienation of Man and Mikhail Bakunin's Philosophy of Negation.Jacek Uglik - 2010 - Studies in East European Thought 62 (1):19 - 28.
    In this paper we attempt to prove that it was Ludwig Feuerbach’s anthropology that influenced Bakunin’s philosophical path. Following his example Bakunin turned against religion which manipulates, as Hegelianism does, the only priority human being has—another human being. Although Feuerbach’s philosophy did not involve social problems present at Bakunin’s works, we would like to show that it was Feuerbach himself who laid foundation for them and that Bakunin’s criticism of the state was the natural consequence of Feuerbach’s struggle for the (...)
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  27.  22
    Language and Philosophical Anthropology in the Work of Mikhail Bakhtin and the Bakhtin Circle.Sergeiy Sandler - 2013 - Rivista Italiana di Filosofia Del Linguiaggio 7 (2):152-165.
    The Bakhtin Circle’s conception of language is very much still alive, still productive, in the language sciences today. My claim in this paper is that to understand the Bakhtin Circle’s continuing relevance to the language sciences, we have to look beyond the linguistic theory itself, to the philosophical groundwork laid for this project by Bakhtin in what he himself referred to as his philosophical anthropology. This philosophical anthropology, at the center of which stands an architectonics of self—other relations, opens the (...)
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  28.  5
    Perepiska [Letters], Mikhail Lifschitz and György Lukács, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011; Pisma V. Dostalu, V. Arslanovu, M. Mikhailovu [Letters to V. Dostal, V. Arslanov, M. Mikhailov], Mikhail Lifschitz, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011. [REVIEW]Evgeni V. Pavlov - 2012 - Historical Materialism 20 (4):187-198.
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  29. What's Next? Michael Crichton's and Mikhail Bulgakov's Criticism of Fetishism in the Life Sciences.Bettina Wahrig - 2018 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 41 (2):167-183.
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  30.  15
    Language for Those Who Have Nothing: Mikhail Bakhtin and the Landscape of Psychiatry.Peter Good - 2001 - Kluwer Academic/Plenum.
    The aim of Language for those who have Nothing is to think psychiatry through the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin. Using the concepts of Dialogism and Polyphony, the Carnival and the Chronotope, a novel means of navigating the clinical landscape is developed. Bakhtin offers language as a social phenomenon and one that is fully embodied. Utterances are shown to be alive and enfleshed and their meanings realised in the context of given social dimensions. The organisation of this book corresponds with (...)
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  31.  13
    Mikhail Bakhtin: Between Phenomenology and Marxism.Michael F. Bernard-Donals - 1995 - Cambridge University Pres.
    The language theory of Mikhail Bakhtin does not fall neatly under any single rubric - 'dialogism,' 'marxism,' 'prosaics,' 'authorship' - because the philosophic foundation of his writing rests ambivalently between phenomenology and Marxism. The theoretical tension of these positions creates philosophical impasses in Bakhtin's work, which have been neglected or ignored partly because these impasses are themselves mirrored by the problems of antifoundationalist and materialist tendencies in literary scholarship. In Mikhail Bakhtin: Between Phenomenology and Marxism Michael Bernard-Donals examines (...)
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  32.  6
    Intersections Between Paul Ricoeur’s Conception of Narrative Identity and Mikhail Bakhtin’s Notion of the Polyphony of Speech.Małgorzata Hołda - 2016 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 21 (2):225-247.
    Proposing his conception of narrative identity in Oneself as Another, Paul Ricoeur holds that human life is comprehensible, once the story of a man’s life has actually been told, and it is the narrative of one’s life which constructs one’s identity. Developing his theory of heteroglossia and the polyphony of human speech, explicated chiefly in Speech Genres and The Dialogic Imagination, Mikhail Bakhtin recognizes the intrinsically intertwining character of utterance and response. According to him, utterance is always addressed to (...)
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  33.  24
    'Minimal Religion' and Mikhail Epstein's Interpretation of Religion in Late-Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia.Jonathan Sutton - 2005 - Studies in East European Thought 58 (2):107 - 135.
    This is an examination of two essays on minimal religion by Mikhail Epstein (1982 and 1999), assessing the usefulness of the term ‘minimal religion’ for the analysis of religion in contemporary Russia.
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  34.  18
    Unity and Disunity in Landmarks: The Rivalry Between Petr Struve and Mikhail Gershenzon.Brian Horowitz - 1999 - Studies in East European Thought 51 (1):61-78.
    In this article the most important text of twentieth-century Russian intellectual history, Landmarks (Vekhi) (1909) comes under reexamination. Looking at the rivalry of the volume''s two organizers, Mikhail Gershenzon and Petr Struve, Professor Brian Horowitz explains why Landmarks succeeded in offering such a biting critique of radical ideology, while lacking its own internal intellectual unity.
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  35.  15
    The Sources for Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita.B. V. Sokolov - 1989 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 27 (4):25-45.
    Mikhail Bulgakov's novel The Master and Margarita was written between 1929 and 1940. Although delayed for a quarter of a century, it quickly found a stable place in our life as soon as it was published [for the first publication of the novel see: Moskva, 1966, no. 11; 1967, no. 1]. It is usually classified as a satirical philosophical novel. The satirical element puts it in the same family as such well-known works of the end of the '20s as (...)
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  36.  9
    Answering as Authoring: Mikhail Bakhtin's Trans-Linguistics.Michael Holquist - 1983 - Critical Inquiry 10 (2):307-319.
    All of Mikhail Bakhtin’s work stands under the sign of plurality, the mystery of the one and the many. Unlike the third eye of Tibetan Buddhism, which gives those who possess it a vision of the secret unity holding creation together, Bakhtin seems to have had a third ear that permitted him to hear differences where others perceived only sameness, especially in the apparent wholeness of the human voice. The obsessive question at the heart of Bakhtin’s thought is always (...)
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  37.  6
    ‘Minimal Religion’ and Mikhail Epstein’s Interpretation of Religion in Late-Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia.Jonathan Sutton - 2005 - Studies in East European Thought 58 (2):107-135.
    This is an examination of two essays on minimal religion by Mikhail Epstein, assessing the usefulness of the term 'minimal religion' for the analysis of religion in contemporary Russia.
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  38.  8
    Charles Taylor, Mikhail Epstein and ‘Minimal Religion’.Ian Fraser - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):159-178.
    In A Secular Age Charles Taylor endorses Mikhail Epstein’s notion of ‘minimal religion’ as his preferred orientation to the good for Western secular society. This article examines the basis of Epstein’s ‘minimal religion’ which rests on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. It is shown that Freud’s theories are incompatible with Taylor’s own thought, and in the case of Jung, Epstein fails to develop the latter’s contribution to our understanding of religion. Moreover, although Taylor endorses Epstein’s (...)
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  39.  6
    A Response to the Forum on Mikhail Bakhtin.Ken Hirschkop - 1985 - Critical Inquiry 11 (4):672.
    Critical Inquiry’s Forum on Mikhail Bakhtin [Critical Inquiry 10 : 225-319] is the latest contribution to the spectacular effort of interpretation and assimilation that is being applied to the work of this recently recovered critic. In such a situation, analysis proceeds with one eye on the work in question and the other on current debates in the field; in the case of Bakhtin, interpretation is at the same time an attempt to come to grips with challenges posed by recent (...)
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  40.  4
    Mikhail L. Gasparov. Intertextual Analysis Today.Mikhail L. Gasparov - 2002 - Sign Systems Studies 30 (2).
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  41.  2
    Repetition as a Stylistic Device in the Work of Mikhail Lermontov.Svetlana S. Neretina - 2016 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 54 (2):160-175.
    The article focuses on the use of repetition in the work of Mikhail Yu. Lermontov. Lermontov utilizes repetition to create a multiplicity of meanings, to redraw plotlines, and to depict the life of things and characters in a state of freedom. An analysis of three Lermontov poems, The Confession, Boyarin Orsha, and Mtsyri shows that they constitute a single train of thought, which cannot be broken without violating Lermontov's attempt to show the limits of not only the human soul, (...)
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  42.  2
    Mikhail Yu. Lermontov's Poetic Legacy: “Rays of Marvelous Light”.Irina N. Sizemskaya - 2016 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 54 (2):98-112.
    The article discusses the philosophical underpinnings of Mikhail Yu. Lermontov's poetry as chiefly expressed in the antithesis of heaven and earth. It is argued that in Russian spiritual culture, Lermontov was the first to bring together the opposed poles of God and man in the sphere of the God-man.
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  43.  9
    On the Conceptual and the Empirical (a Critique of John Mikhail's Cognitivism).Dennis Patterson - manuscript
    Empirical claims are factual claims validated by the methods of science. Conceptual claims involve matters of sense. Empirical inquiry that proceeds from conceptual confusion can never yield fruitful results (i.e., knowledge). John Mikhail's speculations about UMG are an example of conceptual confusions that lead not to knowledge but to claims and assertions that lack sense.
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  44.  43
    Mikhail Bakunin: The Philosophical Basis of His Theory of Anarchism.Paul McLaughlin - 2002 - Algora.
    The first English-language philosophical study of Mikhail Bakunin, this book examines the philosophical foundations of Bakunin?
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  45. Mikhail Bakhtin: The Word in the World.Graham Pechey - 2007 - Routledge.
    Mikhail Bakhtin is one of the most influential theorists of philosophy as well as literary studies. His work on dialogue and discourse has changed the way in which we read texts – both literary and cultural – and his practice of philosophy in literary refraction and philological exploration has made him a pioneering figure in the twentieth-century convergence of the two disciplines. In this book, Graham Pechey offers a commentary on Bakhtin’s texts in all their complex and allusive ‘textuality’, (...)
     
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  46. A Treatise on Arab Music, Chiefly From a Work by Mikh'il Mesh'ḳah, of DamascusA Treatise on Arab Music, Chiefly From a Work by Mikhail Meshakah, of Damascus.Eli Smith, Mikhâil Meshâḳah & Mikhail Meshakah - 1847 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 1 (3):171.
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  47.  9
    Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Prosaics.Gary Saul Morson, Caryl Emerson, Michael F. Bernard-Donals, L. A. Gogotišvili & P. S. Gurevič - 1997 - Studies in East European Thought 49 (4):305-317.
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  48. The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin.Caryl Emerson - 1999 - Utopian Studies 10 (1):200-201.
     
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  49. Reviews : Gary Saul Morson and Caryl Emerson, Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Poetics (Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1990).David Roberts - 1993 - Thesis Eleven 34 (1):186-191.
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  50.  26
    Elements of Moral Cognition by John Mikhail[REVIEW]Mark Phelan - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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