Results for 'Beer Philosophy'

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  1.  19
    The Productivity of Nature. Schelling's Natural Philosophy and the New Paradigm of Self-Organization in the Sciences.Rainer Beer - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (1):16-18.
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  2.  9
    A Key to Philosophy.Rainer Beer - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (2):168-169.
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  3.  29
    Beer & Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking.Steven D. Hales (ed.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption. Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages (...)
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  4. Beer and Philosophy.Steven D. Hales (ed.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    A beer-lovers' book which playfully examines a myriad of philosophical concerns related to beer consumption. Effectively demonstrates how real philosophical issues exist just below the surface of our everyday activities Divided into four sections: The Art of the Beer; The Ethics of Beer: Pleasures, Freedom, and Character; The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Beer; and Beer in the History of Philosophy Uses the context of beer to expose George Berkeley’s views on fermented beverages (...)
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  5.  1
    The Pursuit of Wisdom: Reflections on Some Recent Pursuers:Man and Metaphysics. George Plimpton Adams; The City of Reason. Samuel Beer; Existence and Inquiry. Otis Lee; The Protestant Era. Paul Tillich, James Luther; La Science, La Raison, Et La Foi. S. Van Mierlo; The Philosopher's Way. Jean Wahl; Introduction to Realistic Philosophy. John Wild. [REVIEW]Warner A. Wick - 1949 - Ethics 59 (4):257-.
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  6. Beer and Philosophy: The Unexamined Beer Isn't Worth Drinking.Michael C. Jackson - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  7.  21
    Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry.Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    Food & Philosophy offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins Wine & Philosophy and Beer & Philosophy in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs.
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  8.  8
    Philosophy on Tap: Pint-Sized Puzzles for the Pub Philosopher.Matt Lawrence - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    When beer starts to flow, philosophical discussions naturally follow. _Philosophy on Tap_ takes pub philosophy to the next level, pairing 48 of life's greatest philosophical questions with 48 of the world's best beers. Features a unique presentation of philosophical puzzles, paradoxes, and debates by considering 48 of life's biggest questions in the context of 48 distinctive beers from around the world Provides a highly engaging and sociable approach to the classic philosophical problems as well as a unique look (...)
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  9.  4
    Food and Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry.Fritz Allhoff & Dave Monroe (eds.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Food & Philosophy_ offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins _Wine & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs. Provides a critical reflection on what and how we eat can contribute to a robust enjoyment of gastronomic pleasures A thoughtful, yet playful collection which emphasizes the importance of food as a proper object of philosophical (...)
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  10. Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  11. Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  12. Wine and Philosophy: A Symposium on Thinking and Drinking.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _Wine & Philosophy,_ philosophers, wine critics, and winemakers share their passion for wine through well-crafted essays that explore wine’s deeper meaning, nature, and significance Joins _Food & Philosophy_ and _Beer & Philosophy_ in in the "Epicurean Trilogy Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, wine writers, and winemakers Chapters include, “The Art & Culture of Wine”; “Tasting & Talking about Wine”; “Wine & Its Critics”; “The Beauty of Wine”; “The Metaphysics of Wine”; and “The Politics & Economics (...)
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  13. Beer and Gnosis: The Mead of Inspiration.Theodore Schick - 2007 - In Steven D. Hales (ed.), Beer and Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 137--147.
     
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  14.  9
    “Ein Prosit der Gemütlichkeit” The German Beer Hall as Place of Cultural Performance.Claudia Bosch - 2011 - Environment, Space, Place 3 (2):97-121.
    Festzelte are the beer halls (actually tents) of German Oktoberfest style celebrations—generally called Volksfest. Being transient buildings, the tents can be massive and intimidating. 5,000 or more visitors may find a place to drink, eat, sing, dance and celebrate wildly. Chants proclaim the “Gemütlichkeit” [coziness/snugness] despite an atmosphere supercharged with wild behaviors and heavy drunkenness. Norm breaking, liminal behavior is not only tolerated but even expected and intended (up to a certain point).Victor Turner’s concept of cultural performance helps explain (...)
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  15. Hermeneutical Philosophy in Dialogue with Psychoanalysis and Structuralism: The Renewal of the Subject.C. S. De Beer - 1981 - University of Zululand.
     
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  16.  22
    Of Marigold Beer: A Reply to Vermaas and Houkes.Beth Preston - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):601-612.
    Vermaas and Houkes advance four desiderata for theories of artifact function, and classify such theories into non-intentionalist reproduction theories on the one hand and intentionalist non-reproduction theories on the other. They argue that non-intentionalist reproduction theories fail to satisfy their fourth desideratum. They maintain that only an intentionalist non-reproduction theory can satisfy all the desiderata, and they offer a version that they believe does satisfy all of them. I reply that intentionalist non-reproduction theories, including their version, fail to satisfy their (...)
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  17.  20
    "We Always Have a Beer After the Meeting": How Norms, Customs, Conventions, and the Like Explain Behavior.Todd Jones - 2006 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):251-275.
    There are a vast number of ways of explaining human behavior in the social sciences and in ordinary conversation. One family of accounts seeks to explain behavior using terms such as norms, customs, tradition, convention , and culture . Despite the ubiquity of these terms, it is not fully clear how these concepts really explain behavior, how they are related, how they differ, and what they contrast with. In this article, I hope to answer such questions. Key Words: norm • (...)
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  18.  86
    Mill V. Miller, or Higher and Lower Pleasures.Steven D. Hales - 2007 - In Steven Hales (ed.), Beer & Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    I offer an interpretation of John Stuart Mill's theory of higher and lower pleasures in his Utilitarianism. I argue that the quality of pleasure is best understood as the density of pleasure per unit of delivery. Mill is illustrated with numerous beer examples.
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  19.  16
    Explaining Human Freedom and Dignity Mechanistically: From Receptive to Active Mechanisms.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:43-66.
    Mechanistic explanation is the dominant approach to explanation in the life sciences, but it has been challenged as incompatible with a conception of humans as agents whose capacity for self-direction endows them with freedom and dignity. We argue that the mechanical philosophy, properly construed, has sufficient resources to explain how such characteristics can arise in a material world. Biological mechanisms must be regarded as active, not only reactive, and as organized so as to maintain themselves far from thermodynamic equilibrium. (...)
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  20.  24
    Explaining Human Freedom and Dignity Mechanistically.William Bechtel & Adele Abrahamsen - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:43-66.
    Mechanistic explanation is the dominant approach to explanation in the life sciences, but it has been challenged as incompatible with a conception of humans as agents whose capacity for self-direction endows them with freedom and dignity. We argue that the mechanical philosophy, properly construed, has sufficient resources to explain how such characteristics can arise in a material world. Biological mechanisms must be regarded as active, not only reactive, and as organized so as to maintain themselves far from thermodynamic equilibrium. (...)
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  21.  13
    Embryology and Evolution. By G. R. De Beer. (Oxford: At the Clarendon Press. 1930. Pp. Ix + 116. Price 5s. Net.).J. H. Woodger - 1930 - Philosophy 5 (19):482-.
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  22.  1
    The Beer Experience: Nineteenth Century Relations Between Science and Praxis.Robert Bud - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 47:224-226.
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  23. FH Low-Beer, Questions of Judgment: Determining What's Right Reviewed By.Stephen Satris - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (2):114-115.
     
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  24. F.H. Low-Beer, Questions Of Judgment: Determining What's Right. [REVIEW]Stephen Satris - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16:114-115.
     
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  25. On Local Bars and Imported Beer.Richard Vallée - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 20 (1):62-87.
    “Imported“ is a member of a large family of adjectives, including “enemy“, “domestic“, “local“, “exported“, “foreign“. Call these terms contextuals. Contextuals are prima facie context-sensitive expressions in that the same contextual sentence can have different truth-values, and hence different truth-conditions, from utterance to utterance. I use Perry's multipropositionalist framework to get a new angle on contextuals. I explore the idea that the lexical linguistic meaning of contextual adjectives introduces two conditions to the cognitive significance of an utterance. These conditions contain (...)
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  26. Experimental Philosophy.Joshua Knobe - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):81–92.
    Claims about people's intuitions have long played an important role in philosophical debates. The new field of experimental philosophy seeks to subject such claims to rigorous tests using the traditional methods of cognitive science – systematic experimentation and statistical analysis. Work in experimental philosophy thus far has investigated people's intuitions in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics. Although it is now generally agreed that experimental philosophers have made surprising discoveries about people's intuitions in (...)
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  27. Meditations on First Philosophy.Rene Descartes - 1993 - Caravan Books.
    I have always considered that the two questions respecting God and the Soul were the chief of those that ought to be demonstrated by philosophical rather than ...
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  28. Reading Philosophy with Background Knowledge and Metacognition.David W. Concepción - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):351-368.
    This paper argues that explicit reading instruction should be part of lower level undergraduate philosophy courses. Specifically, the paper makes the claim that it is necessary to provide the student with both the relevant background knowledge about a philosophical work and certain metacognitive skills that enrich the reading process and their ability to organize the content of a philosophical text with other aspects of knowledge. A “How to Read Philosophy” handout and student reactions to the handout are provided.
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  29. Experimental Moral Philosophy.Mark Alfano & Don Loeb - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:1-32.
    Experimental moral philosophy began to emerge as a methodology in the last decade of the twentieth century, a branch of the larger experimental philosophy (X-Phi, XΦ) approach. From the beginning, it has been embroiled in controversy on a number of fronts. Some doubt that it is philosophy at all. Others acknowledge that it is philosophy but think that it has produced modest results at best and confusion at worst. Still others think it represents an important advance.
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  30.  27
    Drink on, the Jolly Prelate Cries.David R. Hilbert - 2007 - In Steven Hales (ed.), Philosophy and Beer. Routledge.
    The 18th century philosopher and Anglican bishop, George Berkeley, is chiefly known to posterity for advocating the radical thesis that there is no unthinking stuff in the world. According to Berkeley, bar stools, kegs, mugs and the all paraphernalia of ordinary life (plus everything else) are merely ideas and have no existence outside the mind of those seated on the stools, tapping the kegs, and drinking from the mugs. What is less well-known is that Berkeley devoted much of his energy (...)
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  31. The Correspondence of John Locke, Volume 1: Introduction, Letters 1-461.E. S. de Beer (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    E. S. de Beer>'s eight-volume edition of the correspondence of John Locke is a classic of modern scholarship. The intellectual range of the correspondence is universal, covering philosophy, theology, medicine, history, geography, economics, law, politics, travel and botany. This first volume covers the years 1650 to 1679.
     
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  32. The Correspondence of John Locke: Volume 1 Introduction, Letters 1-461.E. S. de Beer (ed.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    E. S. de Beer's eight-volume edition of the correspondence of John Locke is a classic of modern scholarship. The intellectual range of the correspondence is universal, covering philosophy, theology, medicine, history, geography, economics, law, politics, travel and botany. This first volume covers the years 1650 to 1679. 'When the eight volumes of correspondence have appeared they will be recognized as one of the great scholarly achievements of their day.' K. H. D. Haley, Times Literary Supplement.
     
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  33. Armchair-Friendly Experimental Philosophy.Jennifer Nagel & Kaija Mortensen - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA, USA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 53-70.
    Once symbolized by a burning armchair, experimental philosophy has in recent years shifted away from its original hostility to traditional methods. Starting with a brief historical review of the experimentalist challenge to traditional philosophical practice, this chapter looks at research undercutting that challenge, and at ways in which experimental work has evolved to complement and strengthen traditional approaches to philosophical questions.
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  34. Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology.Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject.
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  35. There Is No Progress in Philosophy.Eric Dietrich - 2011 - Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
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  36. The Philosophy of Biology.David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on work of the past decade, this volume brings together articles from the philosophy, history, and sociology of science, and many other branches of the biological sciences. The volume delves into the latest theoretical controversies as well as burning questions of contemporary social importance. The issues considered include the nature of evolutionary theory, biology and ethics, the challenge from religion, and the social implications of biology today (in particular the Human Genome Project).
     
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  37. Decision Theory as Philosophy.Mark Kaplan - 1983 - Philosophy of Science 50 (4):549-577.
    Is Bayesian decision theory a panacea for many of the problems in epistemology and the philosophy of science, or is it philosophical snake-oil? For years a debate had been waged amongst specialists regarding the import and legitimacy of this body of theory. Mark Kaplan had written the first accessible and non-technical book to address this controversy. Introducing a new variant on Bayesian decision theory the author offers a compelling case that, while no panacea, decision theory does in fact have (...)
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  38.  24
    Logic and Philosophy of Logic in Wittgenstein.Sebastian Sunday Grève - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    This essay discusses Wittgenstein's conception of logic, early and late, and some of the types of logical system that he constructed. The essay shows that the common view according to which Wittgenstein had stopped engaging in logic as a philosophical discipline by the time of writing Philosophical Investigations is mistaken. It is argued that, on the contrary, logic continued to figure at the very heart of later Wittgenstein's philosophy; and that Wittgenstein's mature philosophy of logic contains many interesting (...)
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  39.  99
    What is Understanding? An Overview of Recent Debates in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.Christoph Baumberger, Claus Beisbart & Georg Brun - 2017 - In Stephen Grimm Christoph Baumberger & Sabine Ammon (eds.), Explaining Understanding: New Perspectives from Epistemolgy and Philosophy of Science. Routledge. pp. 1-34.
    The paper provides a systematic overview of recent debates in epistemology and philosophy of science on the nature of understanding. We explain why philosophers have turned their attention to understanding and discuss conditions for “explanatory” understanding of why something is the case and for “objectual” understanding of a whole subject matter. The most debated conditions for these types of understanding roughly resemble the three traditional conditions for knowledge: truth, justification and belief. We discuss prominent views about how to construe (...)
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  40.  38
    Thinking Through Technology: The Path Between Engineering and Philosophy.Carl Mitcham - 1994 - University of Chicago Press.
    What does it mean to think about technology philosophically? Why try? These are the issues that Carl Mitcham addresses in this work, a comprehensive, critical introduction to the philosophy of technology and a discussion of its sources and uses. Tracing the changing meaning of "technology" from ancient times to our own, Mitcham identifies the most important traditions of critical analysis of technology: the engineering approach, which assumes the centrality of technology in human life and the humanities approach, which is (...)
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  41. Intuitions, Counter-Examples, and Experimental Philosophy.Max Deutsch - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):447-460.
    Practitioners of the new ‘experimental philosophy’ have collected data that appear to show that some philosophical intuitions are culturally variable. Many experimental philosophers take this to pose a problem for a more traditional, ‘armchair’ style of philosophizing. It is argued that this is a mistake that derives from a false assumption about the character of philosophical methods; neither philosophy nor its methods have anything to fear from cultural variability in philosophical intuitions.
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  42.  9
    Contributions to Philosophy (From Enowning).Martin Heidegger - 1999 - Indiana University Press.
    "[Heidegger's] greatest work... essential for all collections." —Choice "... students of Heidegger will surely find this book indispensable." —Library Journal Contributions to Philosophy, written in 1936-38 and first published in 1989 as Beiträge zur Philosophie, is Heidegger’s most ground-breaking work after the publication of Being and Time in 1927. If Being and Time is perceived as undermining modern metaphysics, Contributions undertakes to reshape the very project of thinking.
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  43. Experimental Philosophy Meets Formal Epistemology.Jonah N. Schupbach - forthcoming - In Sytsma & Buckwalter (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.
    Formal epistemology is just what it sounds like: epistemology done with formal tools. Coinciding with the general rise in popularity of experimental philosophy, formal epistemologists have begun to apply experimental methods in their own work. In this entry, I survey some of the work at the intersection of formal and experimental epistemology. I show that experimental methods have unique roles to play when epistemology is done formally, and I highlight some ways in which results from formal epistemology have been (...)
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  44. Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics.Florian Cova, Amanda Garcia & Shen-yi Liao - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):927-939.
    In the past decade, experimental philosophy---the attempt at making progress on philosophical problems using empirical methods---has thrived in a wide range of domains. However, only in recent years has aesthetics succeeded in drawing the attention of experimental philosophers. The present paper constitutes the first survey of these works and of the nascent field of 'experimental philosophy of aesthetics'. We present both recent experimental works by philosophers on topics such as the ontology of aesthetics, aesthetic epistemology, aesthetic concepts, and (...)
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  45.  92
    Wittgenstein's Place in Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1996 - Blackwell.
    This text provides a unique and compelling account of Wittgenstein's impact upon twentieth century analytic philosophy, from its inception at the turn of the ...
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  46. Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.Bernard Williams - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (4):477-496.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline , Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates (...)
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  47. Hobbes on Natural Philosophy as "True Physics" and Mixed Mathematics.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:43-51.
    I offer an alternative account of the relationship of Hobbesian geometry to natural philosophy by arguing that mixed mathematics provided Hobbes with a model for thinking about it. In mixed mathematics, one may borrow causal principles from one science and use them in another science without there being a deductive relationship between those two sciences. Natural philosophy for Hobbes is mixed because an explanation may combine observations from experience (the ‘that’) with causal principles from geometry (the ‘why’). My (...)
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  48. Philosophy of Mind: An Overview for Cognitive Science.William P. Bechtel - 1988 - Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Specifically designed to make the philosophy of mind intelligible to those not trained in philosophy, this book provides a concise overview for students and researchers in the cognitive sciences. Emphasizing the relevance of philosophical work to investigations in other cognitive sciences, this unique text examines such issues as the meaning of language, the mind-body problem, the functionalist theories of cognition, and intentionality. As he explores the philosophical issues, Bechtel draws connections between philosophical views and theoretical and experimental work (...)
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  49.  30
    Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion.J. L. Schellenberg - 2005 - Cornell University Press.
    Providing an original and systematic treatment of foundational issues in philosophy of religion, J. L. Schellenberg's new book addresses the structure of..
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  50. On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Philosophy : Nietzsche's Lying Truth, Heidegger's Speaking Language, and Philosophy.Babette E. Babich - 2003 - In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.
    On the political nature of the analytic - continental distinction in professional philosophy and the general tendency to discredit continental philosophy while redesignating the rubric as analytically conceived.
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