Results for 'Bell's theorem'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  39
    Lessons of Bell's Theorem: Nonlocality, Yes; Action at a Distance, Not Necessarily.Wayne C. Myrvold - 2016 - In Shan Gao Mary Bell (ed.), Quantum Nonlocality and Reality: 50 Years of Bell's Theorem. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 238-260.
    Fifty years after the publication of Bell's theorem, there remains some controversy regarding what the theorem is telling us about quantum mechanics, and what the experimental violations of Bell inequalities are telling us about the world. This chapter represents my best attempt to be clear about what I think the lessons are. In brief: there is some sort of nonlocality inherent in any quantum theory, and, moreover, in any theory that reproduces, even approximately, the quantum probabilities for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Non-Separability Does Not Relieve the Problem of Bell's Theorem.Joe Henson - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (8):1008-1038.
    This paper addresses arguments that “separability” is an assumption of Bell’s theorem, and that abandoning this assumption in our interpretation of quantum mechanics (a position sometimes referred to as “holism”) will allow us to restore a satisfying locality principle. Separability here means that all events associated to the union of some set of disjoint regions are combinations of events associated to each region taken separately.In this article, it is shown that: (a) localised events can be consistently defined without implying (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  3.  84
    Bell's Theorem: Two Neglected Solutions.Louis Vervoort - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (6):769-791.
    Bell’s theorem admits several interpretations or ‘solutions’, the standard interpretation being ‘indeterminism’, a next one ‘nonlocality’. In this article two further solutions are investigated, termed here ‘superdeterminism’ and ‘supercorrelation’. The former is especially interesting for philosophical reasons, if only because it is always rejected on the basis of extra-physical arguments. The latter, supercorrelation, will be studied here by investigating model systems that can mimic it, namely spin lattices. It is shown that in these systems the Bell inequality can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  9
    On Modifications of Reichenbach's Principle of Common Cause in Light of Bell's Theorem.Eric G. Cavalcanti & Raymond Lal - 2014 - Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical 47 (42):424018.
    Bellʼs 1964 theorem causes a severe problem for the notion that correlations require explanation, encapsulated in Reichenbachʼs principle of common cause. Despite being a hallmark of scientific thought, dropping the principle has been widely regarded as much less bitter medicine than the perceived alternative—dropping relativistic causality. Recently, however, some authors have proposed that modified forms of Reichenbachʼs principle could be maintained even with relativistic causality. Here we break down Reichenbachʼs principle into two independent assumptions—the principle of common cause proper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Bell's Theorem Without Inequalities and Without Unspeakable Information.Adán Cabello - 2005 - Foundations of Physics 35 (11):1927-1934.
    A proof of Bell’s theorem without inequalities is presented in which distant local setups do not need to be aligned, since the required perfect correlations are achieved for any local rotation of the local setups.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. An Inverse of Bell's Theorem.Kaj B. Hansen - 1995 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 26 (1):63 - 74.
    A class of probability functions is studied. This class contains the probability functions of half-spin particles and spinning classical objects. A notion of realisability for these functions is defined. In terms of this notion two versions of Bell's theorem and their inverses are stated and proved.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  33
    Bell’s Theorem and the Issue of Determinism and Indeterminism.Michael Esfeld - 2015 - Foundations of Physics 45 (5):471-482.
    The paper considers the claim that quantum theories with a deterministic dynamics of objects in ordinary space-time, such as Bohmian mechanics, contradict the assumption that the measurement settings can be freely chosen in the EPR experiment. That assumption is one of the premises of Bell’s theorem. I first argue that only a premise to the effect that what determines the choice of the measurement settings is independent of what determines the past state of the measured system is needed for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Comments on Shimony's “An Analysis of Stapp's 'A Bell-Type Theorem Without Hidden Variables' ”.Henry Stapp - 2006 - Foundations of Physics 36 (1):73-82.
    The hidden-variable theorems of Bell and followers depend upon an assumption, namely the hidden-variable assumption, that conflicts with the precepts of quantum philosophy. Hence from an orthodox quantum perspective those theorems entail no faster-than-light transfer of information. They merely reinforce the ban on hidden variables. The need for some sort of faster-than-light information transfer can be shown by using counterfactuals instead of hidden variables. Shimony’s criticism of that argument fails to take into account the distinction between no-faster-than-light connection in one (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  75
    The Scope and Generality of Bell's Theorem.James Owen Weatherall - unknown
    I present a local, deterministic model of the EPR-Bohm experiment, inspired by recent work by Joy Christian, that appears at first blush to be in tension with Bell-type theorems. I argue that the model ultimately fails to do what a hidden variable theory needs to do, but that it is interesting nonetheless because the way it fails helps clarify the scope and generality of Bell-type theorems. I formulate and prove a minor proposition that makes explicit how Bell-type theorems rule out (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Bell's Theorem and the Epr Paradox.D. Home & F. Selleri - 1991 - Editrice Compositori.
  11.  4
    Non-Locality as a Fundamental Principle of Reality: Bell's Theorem and Space-Like Interconnectedness.A. Rauscher Elizabeth - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (2):204-216.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  10
    Making Sense of Bell’s Theorem and Quantum Nonlocality.Boughn Stephen - 2017 - Foundations of Physics 47 (5):640-657.
    Bell’s theorem has fascinated physicists and philosophers since his 1964 paper, which was written in response to the 1935 paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Bell’s theorem and its many extensions have led to the claim that quantum mechanics and by inference nature herself are nonlocal in the sense that a measurement on a system by an observer at one location has an immediate effect on a distant entangled system. Einstein was repulsed by such “spooky action at a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Causation, Decision Theory, and Bell's Theorem: A Quantum Analogue of the Newcomb Problem.Eric G. Cavalcanti - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (3):569-597.
    I apply some of the lessons from quantum theory, in particular from Bell’s theorem, to a debate on the foundations of decision theory and causation. By tracing a formal analogy between the basic assumptions of causal decision theory (CDT)—which was developed partly in response to Newcomb’s problem— and those of a local hidden variable theory in the context of quantum mechanics, I show that an agent who acts according to CDT and gives any nonzero credence to some possible causal (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14. Against a Minimalist Reading of Bell's Theorem: Lessons From Fine.Thomas Müller & Tomasz Placek - 2001 - Synthese 128 (3):343 - 379.
    Since the validity of Bell's inequalities implies the existence of joint probabilities for non-commuting observables, there is no universal consensus as to what the violation of these inequalities signifies. While the majority view is that the violation teaches us an important lesson about the possibility of explanations, if not about metaphysical issues, there is also a minimalist position claiming that the violation is to be expected from simple facts about probability theory. This minimalist position is backed by theorems due (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  15. Bell's Theorem in an Indeterministic Universe.Donald Bedford & Henry P. Stapp - 1995 - Synthese 102 (1):139 - 164.
    A variation of Bell's theorem that deals with the indeterministic case is formulated and proved within the logical framework of Lewis's theory of counterfactuals. The no-faster-than-light-influence condition is expressed in terms of Lewis would counterfactual conditionals. Objections to this procedure raised by certain philosophers of science are examined and answered. The theorem shows that the incompatibility between the predictions of quantum theory and the idea of no faster-than-light influence cannot be ascribed to any auxiliary or tacit assumption (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  16. Bell's Theorem Based on a Generalized EPR Criterion of Reality.Philippe H. Eberhard & Philippe Rosselet - 1995 - Foundations of Physics 25 (1):91-111.
    First, the demonstration of Bell's theorem, i.e., of the nonlocal character of quantum theory, is spelled out using the EPR criterion of reality as premises and a gedankenexperiment involving two particles. Then, the EPR criterion is extended to include quantities predicted almostwith certainty, and Bell's theorem is demonstrated on these new premises. The same experiment is used but in conditions that become possible in real life, without the requirements of ideal efficiencies and zero background. Very high (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  2
    Small Probability Space Formulation of Bell's Theorem.Tomasz Placek & Marton Gomori - unknown
    A small probability space representation of quantum mechanical probabilities is defined as a collection of Kolmogorovian probability spaces, each of which is associated with a context of a maximal set of compatible measurements, that portrays quantum probabilities as Kolmogorovian probabilities of classical events. Bell's theorem is stated and analyzed in terms of the small probability space formalism.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Locality and Bell's Theorem.W. De Baere, A. Mann & M. Revzen - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (1):67-77.
    It is shown that the violation of Bell's inequality allowed by quantum mechanics and the related Bell's theorem without inequalities is accounted for by local commutations of operators representing single-particle observables. It is argued that the idea of nonlocal influencing of one particle on another when they are in spacelike separated regions clearly has neither empirical nor theoretical support.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  63
    Whiteheadian Approach to Quantum Theory and the Generalized Bell's Theorem.Henry P. Stapp - 1979 - Foundations of Physics 9 (1-2):1-25.
    The model of the world proposed by Whitehead provides a natural theoretical framework in which to imbed quantum theory. This model accords with the ontological ideas of Heisenberg, and also with Einstein's view that physical theories should refer nominally to the objective physical situation, rather than our knowledge of that system. Whitehead imposed on his model the relativistic requirement that what happens in any given spacetime region be determined only by what has happened in its absolute past, i.e., in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20. A Loophole in Bell's Theorem? Parameter Dependence in the Hess‐Philipp Model.Wayne C. Myrvold - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1357-1367.
    The hidden-variables model constructed by Karl Hess and Walter Philipp is claimed by its authors to exploit a "loophole" in Bell's theorem; according to Hess and Philipp, the parameters employed in their model extend beyond those considered by Bell. Furthermore, they claim that their model satisfies Einstein locality and is free of any "suspicion of spooky action at a distance." Both of these claims are false; the Hess-Philipp model achieves agreement with the quantum-mechanical predictions, not by circumventing (...) theorem, but via Parameter Dependence. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  63
    Generalization of Bell's Theorem.Nick Herbert & Jack Karush - 1978 - Foundations of Physics 8 (3-4):313-317.
    A concise proof of Bell's theorem on the necessary nonlocality of any theory which models individual measurements in correlated quantum mechanical systems is presented. A family of inequalities is derived which may be applied to a broad class of correlated systems to test the assumption of locality.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  76
    An Analysis of Stapp's “A Bell-Type Theorem Without Hidden Variables”.Abner Shimony - 2006 - Foundations of Physics 36 (1):61-72.
    H.P. Stapp has proposed a number of demonstrations of a Bell-type theorem which dispensed with an assumption of hidden variables, but relied only upon locality together with an assumption that experimenters can choose freely which of several incompatible observables to measure. In recent papers his strategy has centered upon counterfactual conditionals. Stapp’s paper in American Journal of Physics, 2004, replies to objections raised against earlier expositions of this strategy and proposes a simplified demonstration. The new demonstration is criticized, several (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  56
    How to (Properly) Strengthen Bell's Theorem Using Counterfactuals.Tomasz Bigaj - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (1):58-66.
    Bell’s theorem in its standard version demonstrates that the joint assumptions of the hidden-variable hypothesis and the principle of local causation lead to a conflict with quantum-mechanical predictions. In his latest counterfactual strengthening of Bell’s theorem, Stapp attempts to prove that the locality assumption itself contradicts the quantum-mechanical predictions in the Hardy case. His method relies on constructing a complex, non-truth functional formula which consists of statements about measurements and outcomes in some region R, and whose truth value (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  75
    Bell's Theorem and Bayes' Theorem.A. J. M. Garrett - 1990 - Foundations of Physics 20 (12):1475-1512.
    Bell's theorem is expounded as an analysis in Bayesian probabilistic inference. Assume that the result of a spin measurement on a spin-1/2 particle is governed by a variable internal to the particle (local, “hidden”), and examine pairs of particles having zero combined angular momentum so that their internal variables are correlated: knowing something about the internal variable of one tells us something about that of the other. By measuring the spin of one particle, we infer something about its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  66
    The Concepts of Influences and of Attributes as Seen in Connection with Bell's Theorem.B. D'Espagnat - 1981 - Foundations of Physics 11 (3-4):205-234.
    With regard to the notion of cause—or more generally of influence—the various methods of proof of Bell's theorem do not all have the same bearing. The differences between two of these methods are analyzed, with regard to both their conceptual basis and their conclusions. It is shown that both methods give valuable information but, not too surprisingly, the one that is based on the more detailed and specific definition of the concept of influences, and that makes use of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  65
    Bell's Theorem and the Nature of Reality.R. A. Bertlmann - 1990 - Foundations of Physics 20 (10):1191-1212.
    We rediscuss the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in Bohm's spin version and oppose to it Bohr's controversial point of view. Then we explain Bell's theorem, Bell inequalities, and its consequences. We describe the experiment of Aspect, Dalibard, and Roger in detail. Finally we draw attention to the nonlocal structure of the underlying theory.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  64
    Bell's Theorem and an Explicit Stochastic Local Hidden-Variable Model.H. P. Seipp - 1986 - Foundations of Physics 16 (11):1143-1152.
    Motivated by a paper by Barut and Meystre, Bohm's EPR gedanken experiment performed with classical and spin-s particles is considered, and the applicability of Bell's theorem to these cases is discussed. The classical model presented by Barut and Meystre is modified to become a stochastic local hidden-variable model reproducing the results of an EPR experiment of the type performed by Aspect et al.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  61
    Comments on “Locality, Bell's Theorem, and Quantum Mechanics”.Henry P. Stapp - 1985 - Foundations of Physics 15 (9):973-976.
    Two different ideas of locality are described. Both are due essentially to einstein. Quantum theory is compatible with the first but not the second. The problems encountered in the article cited in the title arise from trying to use only the first idea of locality, whereas Bell's-theorem considerations pertain to the second.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  60
    Bell's Theorem, Inference, and Quantum Transactions.A. J. M. Garrett - 1990 - Foundations of Physics 20 (4):381-402.
    Bell's theorem is expounded as an analysis in Bayesian inference. Assuming the result of a spin measurement on a particle is governed by a causal variable internal (hidden, “local”) to the particle, one learns about it by making a spin measurement; thence about the internal variable of a second particle correlated with the first; and from there predicts the probabilistic result of spin measurements on the second particle. Such predictions are violated by experiment: locality/causality fails. The statistical nature (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  61
    On Propensity-Frequentist Models for Stochastic Phenomena; with Applications to Bell's Theorem.Tomasz Placek - unknown
    The paper develops models of statistical experiments that combine propensities with frequencies, the underlying theory being the branching space-times (BST) of Belnap (1992). The models are then applied to analyze Bell's theorem. We prove the so-called Bell-CH inequality via the assumptions of a BST version of Outcome Independence and of (non-probabilistic) No Conspiracy. Notably, neither the condition of probabilistic No Conspiracy nor the condition of Parameter Independence is needed in the proof. As the Bell-CH inequality is most likely (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  63
    Einstein's Spooks and Bell's Theorem.John Cramer - unknown
    Einstein's "spookiness" is now called nonlocality, the mysterious ability of Nature to enforce correlations between separated but entangled parts of a quantum system that are out of speed-of-light contact, to reach faster-than-light across vast spatial distances or even across time itself to ensure that the parts of a quantum system are made to match. This column is about nonlocality, and how, through Bell's theorem, the nonlocality implicit in nature has been demonstrated in the laboratory.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  11
    Bell's Theorem, Realism, and Locality.Peter J. Lewis - unknown
    According to a recent paper by Tim Maudlin, Bell’s theorem has nothing to tell us about realism or the descriptive completeness of quantum mechanics. What it shows is that quantum mechanics is non-local, no more and no less. What I intend to do in this paper is to challenge Maudlin’s assertion about the import of Bell’s proof. There is much that I agree with in the paper; in particular, it does us the valuable service of demonstrating that Einstein’s objections (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  2
    On Nieuwenhuizen’s Treatment of Contextuality in Bell’s Theorem.Justo Pastor Lambare - 2017 - Foundations of Physics 47 (12):1591-1596.
    A discussion of Nieuwenhuizen’s description for the hidden variables of the detectors in the derivation of Bell’s theorem is presented. This description prevents Bell’s inequalities from being effected. However it will be argued, on mathematical and physical bases, that the flaws attributed by Nieuwenhuizen to Bell’s probability distribution function are unjustified.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  5
    About a “Contextuality Loophole” in Bell’s Theorem Claimed to Exist by Nieuwenhuizen.I. Schmelzer - 2017 - Foundations of Physics 47 (1):117-119.
    Nieuwenhuizen argued that there exists some “contextuality loophole” in Bell’s theorem. This claim is unjustified. In Bell’s theorem non-contextuality is not presupposed but derived from Einstein causality using the EPR argument.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  13
    Interpretation of the Quantum Formalism and Bell's Theorem.Emilio Santos - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (2):221-241.
    It is argued that quantum mechanics must be interpreted according to the Copenhagen interpretation. Consequently the formalism must be used in a purely operational way. The relation between realism, hidden variables, and the Bell inequalities is discussed. The proof of impossibility of local hidden-variables theories (Bell's theorem) is criticized on the basis that the quantum mechanical states violating local realism are not physically realizable states.“Einstein had great difficulty in reaching a sharp formulation of Bohr's meaning. What hope then (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Bell's Theorem And The Counterfactual Definition Of Locality.Osvaldo Pessoa Jr - 2010 - Manuscrito 33 (1):351-363.
    This paper proposes a solution to the problem of non-locality associated with Bell’s theorem, within the counterfactual approach to the problem. Our proposal is that a counterfactual definition of locality can be maintained, if a subsidiary hypothesis be rejected, “locality involving two counterfactuals”. This amounts to the acceptance of locality in the actual world, and a denial that locality is always valid in counterfactual worlds. This also introduces a metaphysical asymmetry between the factual and counterfactual worlds. This distinction is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  20
    Philosophical Implications of Bell's Theorem.Niall Shanks - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada)
    This study concerns Bells's Theorem that there can be no Bell local hidden variables theory for the quantum spin correlation statistics generated by pairs of spacelike separated spin--1/2 particles in the singlet spin state. Since Bell's Theorem rests on two assumptions: hidden variables and Bell locality, Bell's Theorem leaves us with a dilemma. According to Bell's dilemma we are faced with a choice between the hidden variables assumption and the assumption of Bell locality. Most (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  93
    Hidden Variables and Bell's Theorem in Quantum Mechanics.H. Kummer & R. G. McLean - 1994 - Foundations of Physics 24 (5):739-751.
    In the present paper we give a precise definition of a hidden-variable theory for quantum mechanics, whereby we adopt the weakest possible definition of a hidden-variable theory, which is compatible with the assumption that the bounded observables of a quantum mechanical system are represented by the elements of the real part Ar of a W*-algebra A (of the most general type) and the states are represented by the “normal states” (in the mathematical sense) of A. We then go on to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  48
    Bell on Bell's Theorem: The Changing Face of Nonlocality.Harvey R. Brown & Christopher Gordon Timpson - unknown
    Between 1964 and 1990, the notion of nonlocality in Bell's papers underwent a profound change as his nonlocality theorem gradually became detached from quantum mechanics, and referred to wider probabilistic theories involving correlations between separated beables. The proposition that standard quantum mechanics is itself nonlocal became divorced from the Bell theorem per se from 1976 on, although this important point is widely overlooked in the literature. In 1990, the year of his death, Bell would express serious misgivings (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  9
    Against a Minimalist Reading of Bell's Theorem: Lessons From Fine.Thomas Müller & Tomasz Placek - 2001 - Synthese 128 (3):343-379.
    Since the validity of Bell's inequalities implies the existence of joint probabilities for non-commuting observables, there is no universal consensus as to what the violation of these inequalities signifies. While the majority view is that the violation teaches us an important lesson about the possibility of explanations, if not about metaphysical issues, there is also a minimalist position claiming that the violation is to be expected from simple facts about probability theory. This minimalist position is backed by theorems due (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  59
    Piron's and Bell's Geometric Lemmas and Gleason's Theorem.Georges Chevalier, Anatolij Dvurečenskij & Karl Svozil - 2000 - Foundations of Physics 30 (10):1737-1755.
    We study the idea of implantation of Piron's and Bell's geometrical lemmas for proving some results concerning measures on finite as well as infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, including also measures with infinite values. In addition, we present parabola based proofs of weak Piron's geometrical and Bell's lemmas. These approaches will not used directly Gleason's theorem, which is a highly non-trivial result.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Bell's Theorem: What It Takes.Jeremy Butterfield - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (1):41-83.
    I compare deterministic and stochastic hidden variable models of the Bell experiment, exphasising philosophical distinctions between the various ways of combining conditionals and probabilities. I make four main claims. (1) Under natural assumptions, locality as it occurs in these models is equivalent to causal independence, as analysed (in the spirit of Lewis) in terms of probabilities and conditionals. (2) Stochastic models are indeed more general than deterministic ones. (3) For factorizable stochastic models, relativity's lack of superluminal causation does not favour (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  43.  73
    EPR and Bell's Theorem: A Critical Review. [REVIEW]Henry P. Stapp - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (1):1-23.
    The argument of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen is reviewed with attention to logical structure and character of assumptions. Bohr's reply is discussed. Bell's contribution is formulated without use of hidden variables, and efforts to equate hidden variables to realism are critically examined. An alternative derivation of nonlocality that makes no use of hidden variables, microrealism, counterfactual definiteness, or any other assumption alien to orthodox quantum thinking is described in detail, with particular attention to the quartet or broken-square question.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44. Bell's Theorem, Nonseparability, and Spacetime Individuation in Quantum Mechanics.Darrin W. Belousek - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):46.
    We first examine Howard's analysis of the Bell factorizability condition in terms of 'separability' and 'locality' and then consider his claims that the violations of Bell's inequality by the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics should be interpreted in terms of 'nonseparability' rather than 'nonlocality' and that 'nonseparability' implies the failure of spacetime as a principle of individuation for quantum-mechanical systems. We will argue that his argument for the first claim is less than compelling and that any argument for the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  59
    Individuality, Supervenience and Bell's Theorem.Steven French - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 55 (1):1-22.
    Some recent work in the philosophy of quantum mechanics has suggested that quantum systems can be thought of as non-separable and therefore non-individual, in some sense, in Bell and E.P.R. type situations. This suggestion is set in the context of previous work regarding the individuality of quantal particles and it is argued that such entities can be considered as individuals if their non-classical statistical correlations are understood in terms of non-supervenient relations holding between them. We conclude that such relations are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  46.  2
    Stop Making Sense of Bell's Theorem and Nonlocality? A Reply to Stephen Boughn.Federico Laudisa - unknown
    In a recent paper on Foundations of Physics Stephen Boughn argued that quantum mechanics does not require nonlocality of any kind and that the common interpretation of Bell theorem as a nonlocality result is based on a misunderstanding. In this note I argue that the Boughn arguments, that summarize views widespread in certain areas of the foundations of quantum mechanics, are based on an incorrect reading of the presuppositions of the EPR argument and the Bell theorem and, as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  3
    Stop Making Sense of Bell’s Theorem and Nonlocality?Federico Laudisa - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (2):293-306.
    In a recent paper on Foundations of Physics, Stephen Boughn reinforces a view that is more shared in the area of the foundations of quantum mechanics than it would deserve, a view according to which quantum mechanics does not require nonlocality of any kind and the common interpretation of Bell theorem as a nonlocality result is based on a misunderstanding. In the present paper I argue that this view is based on an incorrect reading of the presuppositions of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. “Local Realism”, Bell's Theorem and Quantum “Locally Realistic” Inequalities.Elena R. Loubenets - 2005 - Foundations of Physics 35 (12):2051-2072.
    Based on the new general framework for the probabilistic description of experiments, introduced in [E.R. Loubenets, Research Report No 8, MaPhySto, University of Aarhus, Denmark (2003); Proceedings Conference “Quantum Theory, Reconsideration of Foundations”, Ser. Math. Modeling, Vol. 10 (University Press, Vaxjo, 2004), pp. 365–385], we analyze in mathematical terms the link between the validity of Bell-type inequalities under joint experiments upon a system of any type and the physical concept of “local realism”. We prove that the violation of Bell-type inequalities (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Stochastic Outcomes in Branching Space-Time: Analysis of Bell's Theorem.Tomasz Placek - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):445-475.
    The paper extends the framework of outcomes in branching space-time (Kowalski and Placek [1999]) by assigning probabilities to outcomes of events, where these probabilities are interpreted either epistemically or as weighted possibilities. In resulting models I define the notion of common cause of correlated outcomes of a single event, and investigate which setups allow for the introduction of common causes. It turns out that a deterministic common cause can always be introduced, but (surprisingly) only special setups permit the introduction of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  50.  87
    Bell's Theorem and the Foundations of Modern Physics.F. Barone, A. O. Barut, E. Beltrametti, S. Bergia, R. A. Bertlmann, H. R. Brown, G. C. Ghirardi, D. M. Greenberger, D. Home & M. Jammer - 1991 - Foundations of Physics 21 (8).
1 — 50 / 1000