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Benjamin Hamby [7]Ben Hamby [4]
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Benjamin Hamby
Coastal Carolina University
Benjamin Hamby
Coastal Carolina University
  1.  67
    A Meta-Level Approach to the Problem of Defining ‘Critical Thinking’.Ralph H. Johnson & Benjamin Hamby - 2015 - Argumentation 29 (4):417-430.
    The problem of defining ‘critical thinking’ needs a fresh approach. When one takes into consideration the sheer quantity of definitions and their obvious differences, an onlooker might be tempted to conclude that there is no inherent meaning to the term: that each author seems to consider that he or she is free to offer a definition that suits them. And, with a few exceptions, there has not been much discussion among proposers about the strength and weaknesses of the attempted definitions. (...)
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  2.  25
    Willingness to inquire: The cardinal critical thinking virtue.Benjamin Hamby - unknown
    Critical thinking skills have associated critical thinking virtues, and the internal motivation to carefully examine an issue in an effort to reach a reasoned judgment, what I call the “willingness to inquire”, is the critical thinking virtue that stands behind all skilled and virtuous thinking that contributes to critical thinking. In this paper, I argue that the willingness to inquire is therefore a more primary critical thinking virtue than charity, open-mindedness, or valuing fallacious-free reasoning.
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  3.  61
    What a Real Argument Is.Ben Hamby - 2012 - Informal Logic 32 (3):313-326.
    : In “What is a ‘Real’ Argument?” Geoff Goddu (2009) suggests and rejects four candidates for what a real argument is, concluding that argumentation theorists should abandon the idea that there is a theoretically significant sub-class of arguments that should be called real. In this paper, I argue against Goddu’s conclusion, finding that real arguments are arguments that are used or that have prospective use in the practice of thinking about matters that call for reasonable and reflective judgment concerning what (...)
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  4.  2
    Libri ad Nauseam: The Critical Thinking Textbook Glut.Benjamin Hamby - 2013 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 21 (1):39-48.
    Critical thinking instructors are faced with an overwhelming number of textbooks to choose from for their courses. Many of these texts do not reflect an awareness of current scholarship in critical thinking and informal logic. I argue that instructors should only adopt textbooks that reflect a sound theoretical understanding of the topic by acknowledging the central role of critical thinking dispositions, offering a more nuanced approach to the teaching of fallacies and of inference, stressing dialectic and argument revision, focusing on (...)
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  5.  31
    Toulmin’s “Analytic Arguments”.Ben Hamby - 2012 - Informal Logic 32 (1):116-131.
    Toulmin’s formulation of “analytic arguments” in his 1958 book, The Uses of Argument, is opaque. Commentators have not adequately explicated this formulation, though Toulmin called it a “key” and “crucial” concept for his model of argument macrostructure. Toulmin’s principle “tests” for determining analytic arguments are problematic. Neither the “tautology test” nor the “verification test” straightforwardly indicates whether an argument is analytic or not. As such, Toulmin’s notion of analytic arguments might not represent such a key feature of his model. Absent (...)
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  6. A Review of THINK Critically by Peter Facione and Carol Ann Gittens. [REVIEW]Benjamin Hamby - 2013 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 28 (1):46-53.
  7.  48
    Eating Flowers, Holding Hands: Should Critical Thinking Pedagogy ‘Go Wild’?Ben Hamby - 2011 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 26 (3):47-53.
    This paper is inspired by Anthony Weston’s “What if Teaching Went Wild?” , in which he proposes a radical approach to environmental education, suggesting among other things a stress on “otherness.” Comparing Weston’s proposal to Richard Paul’s concept of the “strong sense” critical thinker, and to Trudy Govier’s rationale for her pedagogy of argument, I suggest that “going wild” in stand-alone critical thinking courses could provide a positive, unsettling push, helping students to reconnect through the otherness of alternative argumentation.
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  8.  17
    Review of Stephen Brookfield‘s Teaching for Critical Thinking. [REVIEW]Benjamin Hamby - 2015 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 30 (2):63-68.
    Stephen Brookfield offers a distinctive conceptualization of and approach to teaching critical thinking. In this review I highlight some major aspects of his approach, and critique his baseline conception. I conclude that, while evaluating assumptions is an important aspect of critical thinking, it is not as important as Brookfield maintains. Instructors of critical thinking should read his book, but they should remain skeptical of its major substantive theoretical commitments.
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  9.  11
    Commentary on Thinking Critically About Beliefs it’s Hard to Think Critically About.Benjamin Hamby - unknown
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  10.  10
    Review of Diane Halpern’s Thought and Knowledge, 5th Edition. [REVIEW]Benjamin Hamby - 2014 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 29 (2):68-75.
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  11.  4
    Eating Flowers, Holding Hands: Should Critical Thinking Pedagogy ‘Go Wild’?Ben Hamby - 2011 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 26 (3):47-53.
    This paper is inspired by Anthony Weston’s “What if Teaching Went Wild?” , in which he proposes a radical approach to environmental education, suggesting among other things a stress on “otherness.” Comparing Weston’s proposal to Richard Paul’s concept of the “strong sense” critical thinker, and to Trudy Govier’s rationale for her pedagogy of argument, I suggest that “going wild” in stand-alone critical thinking courses could provide a positive, unsettling push, helping students to reconnect through the otherness of alternative argumentation.
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