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  1. In the Quiet of the Monastery Buddhist Controversies Over Quietism.Bernard Faure - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (3):424-438.
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article addresses a) the extent to which the familiar term “Buddhist quietism” is legitimate, b) the use of the term by Jesuit missionaries in Asia at the time that Catholic quietism was briefly flourishing in Europe, and c) the use of the term in the European philosophical controversy over Spinozism. Faure argues that, in most cases, the European critique of Buddhism was aimed at European enemies. (...)
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  2. Double Exposure: Cutting Across Buddhist and Western Discourses.Bernard Faure - 2004 - Stanford University Press.
    This book explores the possible relations between Western types of rationality and Buddhism. It also examines some cliche;s about Buddhism and questions the old antinomies of Western culture (“faith and reason,” or “idealism and materialism”). The use of the Buddhist notion of the Two Truths as a hermeneutic device leads to a double or multiple exposure that will call into question our mental habits and force us to ask questions differently, to think “in a new key.” Double Exposure is somewhat (...)
     
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  3. Afterthoughts.Bernard Faure - 2010 - In Michael Jerryson & Mark Juergensmeyer (eds.), Buddhist Warfare. Oup Usa. pp. 211--223.
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    Introduction: Vanishing Into Things.Barry Allen, Bernard Faure, Jacob Raz, Glenn Alexander Magee, N. Verbin, Dalia Ofer, Elaine Pryce & Amy M. King - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (3):417-423.
    Introducing the sixth and final installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” Allen looks at the symposium retrospectively and concludes that it has mainly concerned “sage knowledge,” defined as foresight into the development of situations. The sagacious knower sees the disposition of things in an early, incipient form and knows how to intervene with nearly effortless and undetectable (quiet) effectiveness. Whatever the circumstance, the sage handles it with finesse, never doing too much but also never leaving anything undone (...)
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    Philosophy of Mind in Sixth-Century China: Paramārtha's "Evolution of Consciousness"Philosophy of Mind in Sixth-Century China: Paramartha's "Evolution of Consciousness".Bernard Faure & Diana Y. Paul - 1985 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 105 (4):758.
  6.  1
    Original Insights Never Fully Present: Chan/Zen/DeconstructionThe Rhetoric of Immediacy: A Cultural Critique of Chan/Zen Buddhism.Stuart Sargent & Bernard Faure - 1996 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (1):77.
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    The Buddhist Icon and the Modern Gaze.Bernard Faure - 1998 - Critical Inquiry 24 (3):768-813.
  8.  5
    The Power of Denial: Buddhism, Purity, and Gender.Bernard Faure & Steven Heine - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):409–412.
  9. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies.Kuang-Ming Wu, Roger T. Ames, Bernard Faure, Terry Kleeman, Chun-Chieh Huang, John H. Berthrong, Yea-Chul Son, Dennis C. H. Cheng & Thomas Lahousse - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5:10.
     
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