16 found
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  1.  44
    Toward a Second-Person Neuroscience.Leonhard Schilbach, Bert Timmermans, Vasudevi Reddy, Alan Costall, Gary Bente, Tobias Schlicht & Kai Vogeley - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):393-414.
    In spite of the remarkable progress made in the burgeoning field of social neuroscience, the neural mechanisms that underlie social encounters are only beginning to be studied and could —paradoxically— be seen as representing the ‘dark matter’ of social neuroscience. Recent conceptual and empirical developments consistently indicate the need for investigations, which allow the study of real-time social encounters in a truly interactive manner. This suggestion is based on the premise that social cognition is fundamentally different when we are in (...)
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  2.  64
    Measuring Consciousness: Is One Measure Better Than the Other?Kristian Sandberg, Bert Timmermans, Morten Overgaard & Axel Cleeremans - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1069-1078.
    What is the best way of assessing the extent to which people are aware of a stimulus? Here, using a masked visual identification task, we compared three measures of subjective awareness: The Perceptual Awareness Scale , through which participants are asked to rate the clarity of their visual experience; confidence ratings , through which participants express their confidence in their identification decisions, and Post-decision wagering , in which participants place a monetary wager on their decisions. We conducted detailed explorations of (...)
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  3.  78
    Different Subjective Awareness Measures Demonstrate the Influence of Visual Identification on Perceptual Awareness Ratings.Michał Wierzchoń, Borysław Paulewicz, Dariusz Asanowicz, Bert Timmermans & Axel Cleeremans - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:109-120.
  4.  21
    Measuring Consciousness: Task Accuracy and Awareness as Sigmoid Functions of Stimulus Duration.Kristian Sandberg, Bo Martin Bibby, Bert Timmermans, Axel Cleeremans & Morten Overgaard - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1659-1675.
    When consciousness is examined using subjective ratings, the extent to which processing is conscious or unconscious is often estimated by calculating task performance at the subjective threshold or by calculating the correlation between accuracy and awareness. However, both these methods have certain limitations. In the present article, we propose describing task accuracy and awareness as functions of stimulus intensity as suggested by Koch and Preuschoff . The estimated lag between the curves describes how much stimulus intensity must increase for awareness (...)
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  5.  31
    Know Thyself: Metacognitive Networks and Measures of Consciousness.Antoine Pasquali, Bert Timmermans & Axel Cleeremans - 2010 - Cognition 117 (2):182-190.
  6.  62
    Optimizing Subjective Measures of Consciousness.Morten Overgaard, Bert Timmermans, Kristian Sandberg & Axel Cleeremans - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):682-684.
    Dienes and Seth (2010) conclude that confidence ratings and post-decision wagering are two comparable and recommendable measures of conscious experience. In a recently submitted paper, we have however found that both methods are problematic and seem less suited to measure consciousness than a direct introspective measure. Here, we discuss the methodology and conclusions put forward by Dienes and Seth, and why we think the two experiments end up with so different recommendations.
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  7.  13
    “Making It Explicit” Makes a Difference: Evidence for a Dissociation of Spontaneous and Intentional Level 1 Perspective Taking in High-Functioning Autism.Sarah Schwarzkopf, Leonhard Schilbach, Kai Vogeley & Bert Timmermans - 2014 - Cognition 131 (3):345-354.
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  8.  28
    A Second-Person Neuroscience in Interaction.Leonhard Schilbach, Bert Timmermans, Vasudevi Reddy, Alan Costall, Gary Bente, Tobias Schlicht & Kai Vogeley - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):441-462.
    In this response we address additions to as well as criticisms and possible misinterpretations of our proposal for a second-person neuroscience. We map out the most crucial aspects of our approach by (1) acknowledging that second-person engaged interaction is not the only way to understand others, although we claim that it is ontogenetically prior; (2) claiming that spectatorial paradigms need to be complemented in order to enable a full understanding of social interactions; and (3) restating that our theoretical proposal not (...)
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  9.  6
    Eyes on the Mind: Investigating the Influence of Gaze Dynamics on the Perception of Others in Real-Time Social Interaction.Ulrich J. Pfeiffer, Leonhard Schilbach, Mathis Jording, Bert Timmermans, Gary Bente & Kai Vogeley - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  10.  34
    Partial Awareness Distinguishes Between Measuring Conscious Perception and Conscious Content: Reply to Dienes and Seth.Bert Timmermans, Kristian Sandberg, Axel Cleeremans & Morten Overgaard - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1081-1083.
    In their comment on Sandberg, Timmermans, Overgaard, and Cleeremans , Dienes and Seth argue that increased sensitivity of the Perceptual Awareness Scale is a consequence of the scale being less exclusive rather than more exhaustive. According to Dienes and Seth, this is because PAS may measure some conscious content, though not necessarily relevant conscious content, “If one saw a square but was only aware of seeing a flash of something, then one has not consciously seen a square.” In this reply, (...)
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  11.  3
    Investigating Alterations of Social Interaction in Psychiatric Disorders with Dual Interactive Eye Tracking and Virtual Faces.Bert Timmermans & Leonhard Schilbach - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  12.  23
    Rules Versus Statistics in Biconditional Grammar Learning: A Simulation Based on Shanks Et Al. (1997).Bert Timmermans - unknown
    A significant part of everyday learning occurs incidentally — a process typically described as implicit learning. A central issue in this and germane domains such as language acquisition is the extent to which performance depends on the acquisition and deployment of abstract rules. In an attempt to address this question, we show that the apparent use of such rules in a simple categorisation task of artificial grammar strings, as reported by Shanks, Johnstone, and Staggs (1997), can be simulated by means (...)
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  13.  1
    Motor Response Influences Perceptual Awareness Judgements.Marta Siedlecka, Justyna Hobot, Zuzanna Skóra, Borysław Paulewicz, Bert Timmermans & Michał Wierzchoń - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 75:102804.
  14.  3
    Multi-Scale Coordination of Distinctive Movement Patterns During Embodied Interaction Between Adults With High-Functioning Autism and Neurotypicals.Leonardo Zapata-Fonseca, Dobromir Dotov, Ruben Fossion, Tom Froese, Leonhard Schilbach, Kai Vogeley & Bert Timmermans - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  15.  43
    Computing Consciousness.Bert Timmermans & Axel Cleeremans - unknown
    monsters, virtual legends such as 2001’s HAL or Demon Seed’s Proteus are actually scary because of their mind. Without lingering on the philosophical debates on whether a certain type of mind can exist independent of its specific embodiment or whether any creature can understand a consciousness that is not like his own (recall Lem’s Solaris), the thing that makes HAL and Proteus so human is not so much their ability to think as their possessing something resembling human consciousness. The point (...)
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  16.  29
    Rules Vs. Statistics in Implicit Learning of Biconditional Grammars.Bert Timmermans - unknown
    A significant part of everyday learning occurs incidentally — a process typically described as implicit learning. A central issue in this domain and others, such as language acquisition, is the extent to which performance depends on the acquisition and deployment of abstract rules. Shanks and colleagues [22], [11] have suggested (1) that discrimination between grammatical and ungrammatical instances of a biconditional grammar requires the acquisition and use of abstract rules, and (2) that training conditions — in particular whether instructions orient (...)
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