Results for 'Best Systems Account'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Simplicity in the Best Systems Account of Laws of Nature.J. Woodward - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (1):91-123.
    This article discusses the role of simplicity and the notion of a best balance of simplicity and strength within the best systems account (BSA) of laws of nature. The article explores whether there is anything in scientific practice that corresponds to the notion of simplicity or to the trade-off between simplicity and strength to which the BSA appeals. Various theoretical rationales for simplicity preferences and their bearing on the identification of laws are also explored. It is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  2. Better Best Systems – Too Good To Be True.Marius Backmann & Alexander Reutlinger - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (3):375-390.
    Craig Callender, Jonathan Cohen and Markus Schrenk have recently argued for an amended version of the best system account of laws – the better best system account (BBSA). This account of lawhood is supposed to account for laws in the special sciences, among other desiderata. Unlike David Lewis's original best system account of laws, the BBSA does not rely on a privileged class of natural predicates, in terms of which the best (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  34
    Toward a Best Predictive System Account of Laws of Nature.Chris Dorst - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axy016.
    This paper argues for a revised best system account of laws of nature. David Lewis's original BSA has two main elements. On the one hand, there is the Humean base, which is the totality of particular matters of fact that obtain in the history of the universe. On the other hand, there is what I call the ‘nomic formula’, which is a particular operation that gets applied to the Humean base in order to output the laws of nature. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  58
    Making Best Systems Best for Us.Siegfried Jaag & Christian Loew - forthcoming - Synthese:1-26.
    Humean reductionism about laws of nature appears to leave a central aspect of scientific practice unmotivated: If the world’s fundamental structure is exhausted by the actual distribution of non-modal properties and the laws of nature are merely efficient summaries of this distribution, then why does science posit laws that cover a wide range of non-actual circumstances? In this paper, we develop a new version of the Humean best systems account of laws based on the idea that laws (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  12
    The Social Conditions for Nanomedicine: Disruption, Systems, and Lock-In.Robert Best & George Khushf - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):733-740.
    Here we consider two ways that nanomedicine might be disruptive. First, low-end disruptions that are intrinsically unpredictable but limited in scope, and second, high end disruptions that involve broader societal issues but can be anticipated, allowing opportunity for ethical reflection.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. The Social Conditions for Nanomedicine: Disruption, Systems, and Lock-In.Robert Best & George Khushf - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):733-740.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Interdisciplinary Health Sciences and Health Systems.J. L. Terpstra, A. Best, D. Abrams & G. Moor - 2010 - In Julie Thompson Klein & Carl Mitcham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. What the Humean Should Say About Entanglement.Harjit Bhogal & Zee R. Perry - 2017 - Noûs 51 (1):74-94.
    Tim Maudlin has influentially argued that Humeanism about laws of nature stands in conflict with quantum mechanics. Specifically Humeanism implies the principle Separability: the complete physical state of a world is determined by the intrinsic physical state of each space-time point. Maudlin argues Separability is violated by the entangled states posited by QM. We argue that Maudlin only establishes that a stronger principle, which we call Strong Separability, is in tension with QM. Separability is not in tension with QM. Moreover, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  9. Spontaneous Mindreading: A Problem for the Two-Systems Account.Evan Westra - 2017 - Synthese 194 (11):4559-4581.
    According to the two-systems account of mindreading, our mature perspective-taking abilities are subserved by two distinct mindreading systems: a fast but inflexible, “implicit” system, and a flexible but slow “explicit” one. However, the currently available evidence on adult perspective-taking does not support this account. Specifically, both Level-1 and Level-2 perspective-taking show a combination of efficiency and flexibility that is deeply inconsistent with the two-systems architecture. This inconsistency also turns out to have serious consequences for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  81
    A Developmental Systems Account of Human Nature.Karola Stotz & Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2018 - In Tim Lewens & Elizabeth Hannon (eds.), Why We Disagree About Human Nature. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 00-00.
    It is now widely accepted that a scientifically credible conception of human nature must reject the folkbiological idea of a fixed, inner essence that makes us human. We argue here that to understand human nature is to understand the plastic process of human development and the diversity it produces. Drawing on the framework of developmental systems theory and the idea of developmental niche construction we argue that human nature is not embodied in only one input to development, such as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Mental Health Care and the Politics of Inclusion: A Social Systems Account of Psychiatric Deinstitutionalization.Enric J. Novella - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (6):411-427.
    This paper provides an interpretation, based on the social systems theory of German sociologist Niklas Luhmann, of the recent paradigmatic shift of mental health care from an asylum-based model to a community-oriented network of services. The observed shift is described as the development of psychiatry as a function system of modern society and whose operative goal has moved from the medical and social management of a lower and marginalized group to the specialized medical and psychological care of the whole (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  75
    Discrepancies Between the Best Philosophical Account of Human Rights and the International Law of Human Rights.James Griffin - 2001 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (1):1-28.
    The best philosophical account of human rights regards them as protections of the values we attach to human agency. The international law of human rights is embodied in a large number of declarations, conventions, covenants, charters, and judicial decisions. There are many discrepancies between the lists of human rights that emerge from these two authoritative sources. This lecture explores the significance of these discrepancies.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  13. Meta-Laws of Nature and the Best System Account.M. Lange - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):216-222.
    The merits of David Lewis’s Best System Account of natural law are frequently debated. But to my knowledge, the prospects for extending the BSA to cover meta-laws have never been examined. I shall identify two obstacles facing the most natural way of extending the BSA to cover meta-laws. The BSA’s fans should consider how these obstacles are to be overcome. Meta-laws are laws about laws. For example, Einstein’s special theory of relativity incorporates a meta-law: The content of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Lewis, Thau, and Hall on Chance and the Best-System Account of Law.John F. Halpin - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (2):349-360.
    August 16, 1997 David Lewis2 has long defended an account of scientific law acceptable even to an empiricist with significant metaphysical scruples. On this account, the laws are defined to be the consequences of the best system for axiomitizing all occurrent fact. Here "best system" means the set of sentences which yields the best combination of strength of descriptive content 3 with simplicity of exposition. And occurrent facts, the facts to be systematized, are roughly the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  25
    Challenging Lewis’s Challenge to the Best System Account of Lawhood.Rafal Urbaniak & Bert Leuridan - 2018 - Synthese 195 (4):1649-1666.
    David Lewis has formulated a well-known challenge to his Best System account of lawhood: the content of any system whatever can be formulated very simply if one allows for perverse choices of primitive vocabulary. We show that the challenge is not that dangerous, and that to account for it one need not invoke natural properties or relativized versions of the Best System account. This way, we help to move towards an even better Best System (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Presidential Address: Discrepancies Between the Best Philosophical Account of Human Rights and the International Law of Human Rights.J. Griffin - 2001 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101:1-28.
    The best philosophical account of human rights regards them as protections of the values we attach to human agency. The international law of human rights is embodied in a large number of declarations, conventions, covenants, charters, and judicial decisions. There are many discrepancies between the lists of human rights that emerge from these two authoritative sources. This lecture explores the significance of these discrepancies.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. School Choice or Best Systems: What Improves Education?Margaret C. Wang & Herbert J. Walberg (eds.) - 2001 - Routledge.
    This book addresses one of the most urgent questions in American society today, one that is currently in the spotlight and hotly debated on all sides: Who shall rule the schools--parents or educators? _School Choice or Best Systems: What Improves Education?_ presents an overview of research and practical applications of innovative--even radical--school reforms being implemented across the United States. These fall along a continuum ranging from "parental choice" to "best systems." At the one extreme are schools (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Better Best Systems and the Issue of CP-Laws.Markus Schrenk - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S10):1787-1799.
    This paper combines two ideas: (1) That the Lewisian best system analysis of lawhood (BSA) can cope with laws that have exceptions (cf. Braddon-Mitchell in Noûs 35(2):260–277, 2001; Schrenk in The metaphysics of ceteris paribus laws. Ontos, Frankfurt, 2007). (2) That a BSA can be executed not only on the mosaic of perfectly natural properties but also on any set of special science properties (cf., inter alia, Schrenk 2007, Selected papers contributed to the sections of GAP.6, 6th international congress (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  19. On Chance and the Best-System Account of Law.John F. Halpin - unknown
    David Lewis[ii] has long defended an account of scientific law acceptable even to an empiricist with significant metaphysical scruples. On this account, the laws are defined to be the consequences of the best system for axiomitizing all occurrent fact. Here "best system" means the set of sentences which yields the best combination of strength of descriptive content[iii] with simplicity of exposition. And occurrent facts, the facts to be systematized, are roughly the particular facts about a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  32
    Birth of an Abstraction: A Dynamical Systems Account of the Discovery of an Elsewhere Principle in a Category Learning Task.Whitney Tabor, Pyeong W. Cho & Harry Dankowicz - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (7):1193-1227.
    Human participants and recurrent (“connectionist”) neural networks were both trained on a categorization system abstractly similar to natural language systems involving irregular (“strong”) classes and a default class. Both the humans and the networks exhibited staged learning and a generalization pattern reminiscent of the Elsewhere Condition (Kiparsky, 1973). Previous connectionist accounts of related phenomena have often been vague about the nature of the networks’ encoding systems. We analyzed our network using dynamical systems theory, revealing topological and geometric (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. A Better Best System Account of Lawhood.Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (1):1 - 34.
    Perhaps the most significant contemporary theory of lawhood is the Best System (/MRL) view on which laws are true generalizations that best systematize knowledge. Our question in this paper will be how best to formulate a theory of this kind. We’ll argue that an acceptable MRL should (i) avoid inter-system comparisons of simplicity, strength, and balance, (ii) make lawhood epistemically accessible, and (iii) allow for laws in the special sciences. Attention to these problems will bring into focus (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  22.  43
    Introduction: Formal Approaches to Multi-Agent Systems: Special Issue of Best Papers of FAMAS 2009.B. Dunin-Keplicz & R. Verbrugge - 2013 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 21 (3):404-406.
    This special issue of the Logic Journal of the IGPL includes revised and updated versions of the best work presented at the fourth edition of the workshop Formal Ap- proaches to Multi-Agent Systems, FAMAS'09, which took place in Turin, Italy, from 7 to 11 September, 2009, under the umbrella of the Multi-Agent Logics, Languages, and Organisations Federated Workshops (MALLOW). -/- Just like its predecessor, research reported in this FAMAS 2009 special issue is very much inspired by practical concerns. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  15
    Introduction: Formal Approaches to Multi-Agent Systems: Special Issue of Best Papers of FAMAS 2007.B. Dunin-Keplicz & R. Verbrugge - 2013 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 21 (3):309-310.
    Over the last decade, multi-agent systems have come to form one of the key tech- nologies for software development. The Formal Approaches to Multi-Agent Systems (FAMAS) workshop series brings together researchers from the fields of logic, theoreti- cal computer science and multi-agent systems in order to discuss formal techniques for specifying and verifying multi-agent systems. FAMAS addresses the issues of logics for multi-agent systems, formal methods for verification, for example model check- ing, and formal approaches (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Special Sciences, Conspiracy and the Better Best System Account of Lawhood.Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender - 2010 - Erkenntnis 73 (3):427 - 447.
    An important obstacle to lawhood in the special sciences is the worry that such laws would require metaphysically extravagant conspiracies among fundamental particles. How, short of conspiracy, is this possible? In this paper we'll review a number of strategies that allow for the projectibility of special science generalizations without positing outlandish conspiracies: non-Humean pluralism, classical MRL theories of laws, and Albert and Loewer's theory. After arguing that none of the above fully succeed, we consider the conspiracy problem through the lens (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  25.  39
    Challenging Design: How Best to Account for the World as It Really Is.Leif Edward Ottesen Kennair - 2003 - Zygon 38 (3):543-558.
    Evolutionary psychology and intelligent‐design theory both need to be able to account for the empirical world, or the world as it is. This essay is an attempt to clarify the challenges these theories need to meet, if the relevant empirical findings are replicable. There is evidence of change in the biological world and of modularity of mind, and there is a growing body of work that finds evolutionary theory a convincing and fruitful account of the “design” of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. The Manipulability Account of Causation Applied to Physical Systems.Louis Vervoort - manuscript
    In the following we will apply the manipulability theory of causation of Woodward 2003 to physical systems, and show that, in the latter context, the theory can be simplified. Elaborating on an argument by Cartwright, we will argue that the notions of ‘modularity’ and ‘intervention’ of the cited work should be adapted for typical physical systems, in order to take coupling of system equations into account. We will show that this allows to reduce all cause types discussed (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  66
    Dress Rehearsals, Previews, and Encores: A New Account of Mental Representation.Nancy Salay - 2014 - Theoria 80 (1):84-97.
    One of the central debates in cognitive science is the dispute over the role of representation in cognition: on computational/representational accounts, representations are theoretically central; on dynamic systems approaches in which cognition is investigated as a particular sort of physical process, representations play either no role, or, at best, a derivative one. But these two perspectives lead to a deeply unsatisfying theoretical divide: accounts situated in the representational camp are plagued by the inscrutable problem of intentionality, while those (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  36
    Pensar por sistemas y pensar por ideas a tener en cuenta. Unas notas a propósito de Giving Reasons. A linguistic-pragmaticapproach to Argumentation Theory (Thinking through Systems and Thinking through Ideas to be taken into account. Some Remarks on Giving Reasons. A Linguistic-Pragmatic Approach to Argumentation Theory). [REVIEW]Luis Vega Reñón - 2011 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 26 (3):321-327.
    RESUMEN: Giving Reasons pretende ofrecer una aproximación no solo precisa, sino comprensiva, a una teoría sistemática de la argumentación. A la luz de una distinción de Vaz Ferreira entre «pensar por sistemas» y «pensar por ideas a tener en cuenta», me gustaría hacer unas observaciones para complementar y, digamos, “abrir” la incipiente clausura teórica del sistema lingüístico-pragmático de Giving Reasons. Voy a considerar dos casos en particular: el tratamiento del concepto mismo de argumentación y la conversión del principio de cooperación (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  12
    Beyond the Law-State: The Adequacy of Raz’s Account of Legal Systems in Explaining Intra-State and Supra-State Legality.Jennifer W. Primmer - 2015 - Ratio Juris 28 (1):149-158.
    I argue that there are two conceptions of ‘comprehensiveness’: 1) Raz’s strong conception whereby comprehensiveness entails supremacy, and 2) a weak conception whereby comprehensiveness does not entail supremacy. The latter is sufficient to distinguish legal and non-legal authorities, and unlike Raz’s notion of comprehensiveness, allows one to account for both intra-state forms of legality (e.g., the federal-provincial relation in Canada) and supra-state forms of legality (e.g., the European Union). Moreover, although it is ideal for legal systems to claim (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  15
    Charles Taylor's `Imaginary' and `Best Account' in Latin America.Gustavo Morello - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):617-639.
    Imaginary is, in Taylor's thought, a category of understanding social praxis and the reasons people give to make sense of these practices. The ultimate reason is the hypergood, which influences the strong decisions. Those strong evaluations outline the moral framework from which people address their own lives and the lives of others. We only recognize our cultural framework as an `imaginary' — challenging the supposition it is something `objective' — when others make their apparition in our lives. After the encounter (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  5
    The Two-Systems Account of Theory of Mind: Testing the Links to Social- Perceptual and Cognitive Abilities.Bozana Meinhardt-Injac, Moritz M. Daum, Günter Meinhardt & Malte Persike - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  32.  2
    A Mass Assembly of Associative Mechanisms: A Dynamical Systems Account of Natural Social Interaction.Nicholas D. Duran, Rick Dale & Daniel C. Richardson - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):198.
  33. From Arbuthnot to Boltzmann: The Past Hypothesis, the Best System, and the Special Sciences.Mathias Frisch - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):1001-1011.
    In recent work on the foundations of statistical mechanics and the arrow of time, Barry Loewer and David Albert have developed a view that defends both a best system account of laws and a physicalist fundamentalism. I argue that there is a tension between their account of laws, which emphasizes the pragmatic element in assessing the relative strength of different deductive systems, and their reductivism or funda- mentalism. If we take the pragmatic dimension in their (...) seriously, then the laws of the special sciences should be part of our best explanatory system of the world, as well. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  34.  1
    Two Visual Systems in Molyneux Subjects.Gabriele Ferretti - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):643-679.
    Molyneux’s question famously asks about whether a newly sighted subject might immediately recognize, by sight alone, shapes that were already familiar to her from a tactile point of view. This paper addresses three crucial points concerning this puzzle. First, the presence of two different questions: the classic one concerning visual recognition and another one concerning vision-for-action. Second, the explicit distinction, reported in the literature, between ocular and cortical blindness. Third, the importance of making reference to our best neuroscientific (...) on vision, ‘the two visual systems model’, in order to better address Molyneux’s problem. Then, by offering a new, deeper analysis of the relation between, and, this paper suggests that the subjects of Molyneux’s two different questions show the same visual impairment as brain-damaged subjects with different lesions of the visual cortex. In particular, the subject of the first question shows the same impairment in visual recognition as a visual agnosic subject, while the subject of the second question shows the same visual impairment in visuomotor processing as an optic ataxic subject. These impairments still hold even if ocular processing is restored. Therefore, I suggest the following. For the first classic question, the required experimental setting cannot be properly reached. By contrast, concerning the second question, based on the interpretation we select, either the answer is negative, or, as with the first question, the experimental setting cannot be properly reached. This proposal constitutes, with the other approaches offered in the literature, a further attempt to tackle the enormous complexity of Molyneux’s puzzle. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  49
    Practical Reasoning as Presumptive Argumentation Using Action-Based Alternating Transition Systems.Katie Atkinson & Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (10-15):855-874.
    In this paper we describe an approach to practical reasoning, reasoning about what it is best for a particular agent to do in a given situation, based on presumptive justifications of action through the instantiation of an argument scheme, which is then subject to examination through a series of critical questions. We identify three particular aspects of practical reasoning which distinguish it from theoretical reasoning. We next provide an argument scheme and an associated set of critical questions which is (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  36.  5
    Pictures, Emotions, and the Dorsal/Ventral Account of Picture Perception.Gabriele Ferretti - 2017 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 8 (3):595-616.
    Everyday life suggests that picture seeing is sometimes infused by an emotional charge. However, nobody has addressed the importance of explaining this emotional charge in picture perception. Even our best model of picture perception, the dorsal/ventral account of picture perception, which integrates the most important empirical results coming from our best model on vision in neuroscience, the two visual systems model, lacks a reference to this emotional charge. The aim of the present paper is to offer (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  76
    Foundations of Niklas Luhmann's Theory of Social Systems.Alex Viskovatoff - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (4):481-516.
    Of all contemporary social theorists, Luhmann has best understood the centrality of the concept of meaning to social theory and has most extensively worked out the notion's implications. However, despite the power of his theory, the theory suffers from difficulties impeding its reception. This article attempts to remedy this situation with some critical arguments and proposals for revision. First, the theory Luhmann adopted from biology as the basis of his own theory was a poor choice since that theory has (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38.  3
    Do Brokers Act in the Best Interests of Their Clients? New Evidence From Electronic Trading Systems.Annilee M. Game & Andros Gregoriou - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (2):187-197.
    Prior research suggests brokers do not always act in the best interests of clients, although morally obligated to do so. We empirically investigated this issue focusing on trades executed at best execution price, before and after the introduction of electronic limit-order trading, on the London Stock Exchange. As a result of limit-order trading, the proportion of trades executed at the best execution price for the customer significantly increased. We attribute this to a sustained increase in the liquidity (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  42
    What Is Management and What Do Managers Do? A Systems Theory Account.Bruce G. Charlton & Peter Andras - 2003 - Philosophy of Management 3 (3):3-15.
    Systems Theory analyses the world in terms of communications and divides the natural world into environment and systems. Systems are characterised by their high density of communications and tend to become more complex and efficient with time, usually by means of increased specialisation and coordinationof functions.Management is an organisational sub-system which models all necessary aspects of organisational activity such that this model may be used for monitoring, prediction and planning of the organisation as a whole. The function (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  3
    Relating Language to Other Cognitive Systems: An Abridged Account.Leonard Talmy - 2014 - Cosmos and History 10 (1):211-226.
    An important research direction in cognitive science consists of cross-comparing the forms of organization exhibited by different cognitive systems, with the long-range aim of ascertaining the overall character of human cognitive organization. Relatively distinct major cognitive systems of this sort would seem to include: perception, motor control, affect, reasoning, language, and cultural structure. The general finding is that some properties of organization are shown by only one system, some by several, and some by all. This arrangement is called (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  3
    An Enactive and Dynamical Systems Theory Account of Dyadic Relationships.Miriam Kyselo & Wolfgang Tschacher - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42. Memory and a Priori Best Strategy in Complex Adaptive Systems.Marcelino Quito, Christopher Monterola & Caesar Saloma - 2004 - Complexity 9 (3):41-46.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  2
    Representation, Equality, and Inclusion in Deliberative Systems: Desiderata for a Good Account.Eva Erman - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (3):263-282.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  81
    Formal Systems as Physical Objects: A Physicalist Account of Mathematical Truth.E. Szabo´ La´Szlo´ - 2003 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 17 (2):117-125.
    This article is a brief formulation of a radical thesis. We start with the formalist doctrine that mathematical objects have no meanings; we have marks and rules governing how these marks can be combined. That's all. Then I go further by arguing that the signs of a formal system of mathematics should be considered as physical objects, and the formal operations as physical processes. The rules of the formal operations are or can be expressed in terms of the laws of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  18
    14. For the Best Account Showing That "Ought" Does or Does Not Imply "Can".Donald Walhout - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (3):502-505.
  46.  12
    7. For the Best Listing of the Differences Between Aristotle's Logic and Aristotelian Logic. Or, Alternatively, for the Best Account Showing That the Differences Are Non-Existent or Minor.William H. Kane - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):321-324.
  47.  9
    7. For the Best Listing of the Differences Between Aristotle's Logic and Aristotelian Logic. Or, Alternatively, for the Best Account Showing That the Differences Are Non-Existent or Minor.Robert Goedecke - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):319-321.
  48.  15
    14. For the Best Account Showing That "Ought" Does or Does Not Imply "Can".Max Roesler - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (3):505-507.
  49.  8
    23. For the Best Account Showing What is Gained and/or Lost in Making an Idea Clear.George E. Stack - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):568-571.
  50.  3
    Matthew Shugart and Martin Wattenberg (Eds.), Mixed-Member Electoral Systems: The Best of Both Worlds? Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Matthew Carlson - 2002 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 3 (2):289-302.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000