Search results for 'Bible and science' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Charles E. Hummel (1986). The Galileo Connection Resolving Conflicts Between Science & the Bible.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Jeffrey Barnouw (2001). Bible, science et souveraineté chez bacon et hobbes. Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 133 (3):247-265.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Dane T. Daniel (2003). Paracelsus' "Astronomia Magna" : Bible-Based Science and the Religious Roots of the Scientific Revolution. Dissertation, Indiana University
    Focusing on the Astronomia Magna, the magnum opus of Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim, or Paracelsus, the dissertation provides a detailed look into Paracelsus ' oft-neglected and misrepresented views on the make-up of humans and the universe, and highlights the religious values fundamental to the formation, expression, and reception of his science, Robert K. Merton and Reijer Hookyaas have helpfully pointed to salient religious factors in the development of modern science, but they overemphasize seventeenth-century English Calvinism. A century earlier, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Robert Iliffe (1998). Peter Harrison, the Bible, Protestantism and the Rise of Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. XI+313. Isbn 0-521-59196-1. £40.00, $64.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 31 (4):469-487.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  9
    S. F. (1999). Peter Harrison the Bible, Protestantism, and the Rise of Natural Science. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998). Pp. XI+313. £35.00 Hbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (2):241-243.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    Jacques Follon (1999). Dominique Tassot, La Bible au Risque de la Science: De Galilée au P. Lagrange. Préface de Pierre Chaunu. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 97 (1):174-178.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  5
    Jacques G. Ruelland (1994). L'Amérique Entre la Bible Et Darwin Dominique Lecourt Collection «Science, Histoire Et Société» Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1992, 232 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33 (4):781.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Isaac Asimov (1982). Interview by Paul Kurtz:" An Interview with Isaac Asimov on Science and the Bible,". Free Inquiry 2:9.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Jacques Fantino (2000). La Notion de Chaos En Science Et Dans la Bible. Revue des Sciences Religieuses 74 (3):292-303.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Dominique Lecourt (1993). L'Amérique entre la Bible et Darwin, coll. « Science, histoire et société ». Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 183 (4):722-724.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Richard Popkin (1974). Bible Criticism and Social Science. In R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), Methodological and Historical Essays in the Natural and Social Sciences. Boston,Reidel 339--360.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. V. Tressider (1999). Peter Harrison, The Bible, Protestantism and the Rise of Natural Science. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):382-383.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Gregory W. Dawes (2012). Evolution and the Bible: The Hermeneutical Question. Relegere 2:37-63.
    Theistic evolutionists often suggest that one can reconcile evolutionary theory with biblical teaching. But in fact Christians have accepted Darwinian theory only after reinterpreting the opening chapters of Genesis. Is such a reinterpretation justified? Within Western Christian thought, there exists a hermeneutical tradition that dates back to St Augustine and which offers guidelines regarding apparent conflicts between biblical teaching and natural philosophy (or “science”). These state that the literal meaning of the text may be abandoned only if the natural-philosophical (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  14
    Graham Oppy (1998). Biblical Science? [REVIEW] Philo 1 (2):68-78.
    Short critical review of Gerard Schroeder's *The Science of God*.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  44
    Iii Holmes Rolston (2006). Environmental Ethics and Religion/Science. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 908--928.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  17
    Noah J. Efron (2007). Judaism and Science: A Historical Introduction. Greenwood Press.
    The sages of Israel and natural wisdom -- Jews and natural philosophy -- Jews and science.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Vern S. Poythress (1976). Philosophy, Science, and the Sovereignty of God. P&R Pub..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    Eric S. Rabkin (1995). Vegetable, Animal, Human. Human Nature 6 (2):165-182.
    Bible myths, fairy tales, and science fictions all offer narratives that imply and sometimes question boundaries for human behavior. By subscription to certain narratives, individuals can enter and leave social groups; by evolving narratives, groups can adjust the realm of the allowable and the realm of the forbidden; and by selective transgression, individuals can gain power beyond that initially granted by the group. All these functions of narrative contribute to the sociobiological vigor of the individuals and groups that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  41
    Stefano Bigliardi (2011). Snakes From Staves? Science, Scriptures, and the Supernatural in Maurice Bucaille. Zygon 46 (4):793-805.
    Abstract The aim of this paper is to attain a philosophical evaluation of the ideas of the French author Maurice Bucaille. Bucaille formulated an influential discourse regarding the divinity of the Qur’an, which he tried to demonstrate through a comparison of some of its verses with what he defined as scientific data. With his works, which encompass a criticism of the Bible and a defense of creationism, Bucaille furthered the idea that Islam is in harmony with natural sciences, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  20.  96
    Alvin Plantinga (1991). When Faith and Reason Clash: Evolution and the Bible. Christian Scholar's Review 21 (1):8-32.
    My question is simple: how shall we Christians deal with apparent conflicts between faith and reason, between what we know as Christians and what we know in other ways, between teaching of the Bible and the teachings of science? As a special case, how shall we deal with apparent conflicts between what the Bible initially seems to tell us about the origin and development of life, and what contemporary science seems to tell us about it? Taken (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  21.  45
    Alister E. McGrath (2006). Darwinism. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 681-696.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712268; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 681-696.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 694-696.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  37
    Wolfhart Pannenberg (2006). Contributions From Systematic Theology. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 359-371.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712206; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 359-371.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 371.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  3
    Holmes Rolston (1996). The Bible and Ecology. Interpretation 50 (1):16-26.
    The Bible is not a book of science, and therefore not of ecology. It does, however, sketch a vision of human ecology, and contemporary readers encounter claims about how to value nature. The Bible's vision is simultaneously biocentric, anthropocentric, and theocentric. The Hebrews discovered who they were as they discovered where they were, and their scriptures can be a catalyst in our ecological crisis.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  11
    Peter Addinall (1991). Philosophy and Biblical Interpretation: A Study in Nineteenth-Century Conflict. Cambridge University Press.
    This study explores the nature of the conflict between science and religion. It shows through a detailed examination of this conflict as it was manifested in nineteenth century Britain that it is a fallacy that religion and science can co-exist in mutual harmony, since the legacy of their conflict in the past century has been inherited by this century, greatly to the detriment of religious belief. It is the author's contention that a return to the essentials of Kant's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. William Johnson (2000). The Bible on Environmental Conservation: A 21st Century Prescription. Quodlibet 2.
    It may come as a surprise to some, but the Bible has a great deal to say about the environment and its conservation some 20 centuries since it was written. Perhaps among the most surprised will be Bible-toting church goers who may have never heard a sermon related to the "environmental crisis" which has become such a concern to so many around the world. This lack of attention by Christians is especially perplexing since many of our environmental problems (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Londa Schiebinger (1988). Feminine Icons: The Face of Early Modern Science. Critical Inquiry 14 (4):661-691.
    In early modern science, the struggle between feminine and masculine allegories of science was played out within fixed parameters. Whether science itself was to be considered masculine or feminine, there never was serious debate about the gender of nature, one the one hand, or of the scientist, on the other. From ancient to modern times, nature—the object of scientific study—has been conceived as unquestionably female.5 At the same time, it is abundantly clear that the practitioners of (...), scientists, themselves, overwhelmingly have been men.But what about science? What gender was it—as an activity and set of ideals—to have? In one tradition the answer was clear: science was a woman. This tradition, stretching back at least to Boethius’ sixth-century portrayal of Philosophy as a woman, was codified and explained in Cesare Ripa’s Iconologia, the Renaissance bible of iconography.6 In this work, Ripa portrayed each of the sciences as a woman. “Scientia”—knowledge or skill—was portrayed as a woman of serious demeanor, wearing stately robes . “Physica”—physical science—was a goddess with a terrestrial globe at her feet. Geometry was a woman holding a plumb line and compass. Astrology, too, was a woman, dressed in blue, with a crown of stars and wings signifying the elevation of her thoughts to the distant stars. With a compass in her right hand and the celestial sphere in her left, she studied the movement and symmetry of the skies. 5. See Carolyn Merchant, The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution .6. Boethius describes female Philosophy as she appeared to him in a dream in his De consolatione philosophiae. See also Cesare Ripa, Iconologia , first illustrated in 1603. Londa Schiebinger is an assistant professor of history at Pennsylvania State University. Her book, “The Mind has no Sex”: Women in the Origins of Modern Science, will be published next spring. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Mark Perakh (2004). Unintelligent Design. Prometheus Books.
  28. Thomas Mary Berry, Anne Lonergan, Caroline Richards & Gregory Baum (eds.) (1987). Thomas Berry and the New Cosmology. Twenty-Third Publications.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Jean Ladrière (1970). L'articulation du Sens Discours Scientifique Et Parole de la Foi. Aubier Montaigne.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  41
    Eric Palmer (2011). The Wisdom in Wood Rot: God in Eighteenth Century Scientific Explanation. In William Krieger (ed.), Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science. Lexington Books 17-35.
    This chapter presents a historical study of how science has developed and of how philosophical theories of many sorts – philosophy of science, theory of the understanding, and philosophical theology – both enable and constrain certain lines of development in scientific practice. Its topic is change in the legitimacy or acceptability of scientific explanation that invokes purposes, or ends; specifically in the argument from design, in the natural science field of physico-theology, around the start of the eighteenth (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  4
    Michel Deneken (2002). Quand Dieu apprend à parler aux hommes : Herder et la bible. Recherches de Science Religieuse 4 (4):487-508.
    Le concept organisateur de ce que représente l'Ancien Testament pour Herder est tout entier contenu dans l'idée de poésie hébraïque. Aussi n'est il pas illégitime de considérer Herder comme théologien : la théologie herdérienne surgit notamment à travers les concepts de l'origine, du hiéroglyphe et de la Révélation, le mystère des origines pouvant être décrypté dans un monde déchiffrable. Ces éléments de « lecture » du monde se concentrent dans une conception originale de la Bible, lieu du poème par (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  2
    Anne Pénicaud (2001). Vers une lecture figurative de la bible : les mutations de la sémiotique biblique. Recherches de Science Religieuse 3 (3):377-401.
    Née en dehors du champ biblique, la sémiotique n'a pas seulement croisé son chemin, elle s'y est fortement engagée. Retraçant l'itinéraire de A.-J. Greimas concevant la sémiotique comme une méthodologie qui a recours à divers processus descriptifs et analytiques pour faire émerger la signification d'un texte, A. Pénicaud aborde dans une seconde partie la “ sémiotique biblique ” comme telle. En s'intéressant à la Bible, à partir des années 1970 en France surtout, la sémiotique tentait de porter la rigueur (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Jacques Roubaud (2001). « Traduire pour les 'idiots' » : Sébastien Châteillon et la Bible. Recherches de Science Religieuse 3 (3):353-376.
    Châteillon a peut-être laissé un plus grand souvenir par son opposition à Calvin dans l'affaire Servet que par sa traduction française de la Bible. Après le rappel à grands traits de la vie de ce “ savoyard ” , J. Roubaud place son œuvre de traducteur sous le signe de cette affaire, de son adhésion à la Réforme et de son souci de s'adresser non seulement aux lettrés, à ceux qui connaissent la latin et le grec, mais surtout aux (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. H. Evan Runner (1967). The Relation of the Bible to Learning. Rexdale, Ont.,Association for Reformed Scientific Studies.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. J. Trublet (1998). Bible Et Drogue. Recherches de Science Religieuse 86 (2):201-220.
    Fléau de nos sociétés contemporaines, l'usage de la drogue, des drogues, n'est pas un phénomène absolument nouveau dans l'humanité. La Bible elle-même en traite, à sa façon sans doute, mais qui est d'abord tributaire des modes de pensée et de représentation comme de l'état des connaissances de l'Antiquité et plus particulièrement du Proche-Orient ancien. La pharmacopée autant que des pratiques que nous jugerions aujourd'hui explicitement superstitieuses entrent dans cette recherche et réception des drogues. S'il n'y a pas de traité (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Derek Bolton (2008). What is Mental Disorder?: An Essay in Philosophy, Science, and Values. Oxford University Press.
    The effects of mental disorder are apparent and pervasive, in suffering, loss of freedom and life opportunities, negative impacts on education, work satisfaction and productivity, complications in law, institutions of healthcare, and more. With a new edition of the 'bible' of psychiatric diagnosis - the DSM - under developmental, it is timely to take a step back and re-evalutate exactly how we diagnose and define mental disorder. This new book by Derek Bolton tackles the problems involved in the definition (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  37.  19
    Adam R. Shapiro (2008). Civic Biology and the Origin of the School Antievolution Movement. Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):409 - 433.
    In discussing the origins of the antievolution movement in American high schools within the framework of science and religion, much is overlooked about the influence of educational trends in shaping this phenomenon. This was especially true in the years before the 1925 Scopes trial, the beginnings of the school antievolution movement. There was no sudden realization in the 1920's – sixty years after the "Origin of Species" was published – that Darwinism conflicted with the Bible, but until evolution (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38.  5
    Terence D. Keel (2013). Religion, Polygenism and the Early Science of Human Origins. History of the Human Sciences 26 (2):3-32.
    American polygenism was a provocative scientific movement whose controversial claim that humankind did not share a common ancestor caused a firestorm among naturalists and the lay public beginning in the 1830s. This article gives specific attention to the largely overlooked religious ideas marshaled by American polygenists in their effort to construct race as a unit of analysis. I focus specifically on the thought of the American polygenist and renowned surgeon Dr Josiah Clark Nott (1804–73) of Mobile, Alabama. Scholars have claimed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Jacek Tomczyk & Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). On Evolution and Creation: Problem Solved? The Polish Example. Zygon 44 (4):859-878.
    We present the results of research carried out as a part of the project “Current Controversies about Human Origins: Between Anthropology and the Bible”, which focused on the supposed conflict between natural sciences and some branches of the humanities, notably philosophy and theology, with regard to human origins. One way to tackle the issue was to distribute a questionnaire among students and teachers of the relevant disciplines. Teachers of religion and the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, and physics) and students (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  12
    Daniel J. Boorstin (1941). The Mysterious Science of the Law: An Essay on Blackstone's Commentaries Showing How Blackstone, Employing Eighteenth Century Ideas of Science, Religion, History, Aesthetics, and Philosophy, Made of the Law at Once a Conservative and a Mysterious Science. University of Chicago Press.
    Referred to as the "bible of American lawyers," Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England shaped the principles of law in both England and America when its first volume appeared in 1765. For the next century that law remained what Blackstone made of it. Daniel J. Boorstin examines why Commentaries became the most essential knowledge that any lawyer needed to acquire. Set against the intellectual values of the eighteenth century-and the notions of Reason, Nature, and the Sublime-- Commentaries is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  3
    Oscar Sheynin (1998). Stochastic Thinking in the Bible and the Talmud. Annals of Science 55 (2):185-198.
    The use of such concepts as randomness and probability is discussed and stochastic decisions occurring in the sacred texts are studied. In connection with probability, the measurements made in antiquity in order to comply with religious demands are also touched on. The cases where cause rather than randomness was recognized to be at work are indicated, and the statements contained in the Talmud and the thoughts of its later commentator, Maimonides, on hypotheses are linked with the appropriate opinions of Isaac (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  2
    William E. Carroll (1999). Galileo and the Interpretation of the Bible. Science and Education 8 (2):151-187.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  2
    Pierre Gibert S. J. (2011). La clarté d'une fin : l'interpretation historico-critique de la bible. Recherches de Science Religieuse 4:511-527.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  2
    Wolfgang Yourgrau (1960). Philosophy of Science and Analysis. Philosophy 35 (133):147-151.
    Robert Oppenheimer tells the story about a group of Bible scholars who practised exegesis with grim determination. A visitor, admiring so much earnest learning, inquired whether they did not find certain texts supremely difficult. Answered one Bible student: “Indeed—but what we do not understand we explain to one another.”.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. M. D. Eddy (2004). Fallible or Inerrant? A Belated Review of the Constructivists Bible. British Journal for the History of Science 37 (1):93-98.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Pierre Gibert (2011). La clarté d'une fin: L'interpretation historico-critique de la bible: Sur Joseph ratzinger/benoît XVI, Jésus de Nazareth 2. de l'entrée àjérusalem à la résurrection. Recherches de Science Religieuse 99 (4).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Kevin C. Knox (1996). Dephlogisticating the Bible: Natural Philosophy and Religious Controversy in Late Georgian Cambridge. History of Science 34 (104):167-200.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Thomas M. Lennon, John M. Nicholas & John W. Davis (1984). Problems of Cartesianism. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 174 (4):471-474.
    The typical Cartesian collection contains papers which treat the problems arising out of Descartes's philosophy as though they and it appeared for the first time in a recent journal. The approach of this collection is quite different. The eight contributors concentrate on problems faced by Cartesianism which are of historical significance. Without denigrating the importance of the technique of exploiting the texts in a manner that appeals to contemporary philosophical interests, the contributors show how Cartesianism was shaped over time by (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Gulbarga Michael (2007). Ethics of the Bhagavadgita and the Gospels (Bible). In D. N. Shanbhag, K. B. Archak & Michael (eds.), Science, History, Philosophy, and Literature in Sanskrit Classics: Dr. Sundeep Prakashan 219.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Hans Moscicke (2016). The Scientific Allegory of John Augustine Zahm: Zahm's Theological Method with Insight From Marie‐Joseph Lagrange. Zygon 51 (4):925-948.
    Catholic modernist John Augustine Zahm is best known for his attempt to reconcile the theory of evolution with the Christian scriptures. However, Zahm's theological method—the underlying principles and procedures in his effort to reconcile faith and science—remains largely unexamined. In this article, I analyze Zahm's theological method and submit that it is an attempt to harmonize scientific knowledge and Christian scripture through a “scientific allegory” of the bible, which takes into account the human and divine meanings of scripture, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000