26 found
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  1.  25
    The Disinterested Witness: A Fragment of Advaita Vedanta Phenomenology.Bina Gupta - 1998 - Northwestern University Press.
    The Disinterested Witness is a detailed, contextual, and interpretive study of the concept of saksin (or that which directly or immediately perceives) in Advaita Vedanta, and a fascinating and significant comparison of the philosophies of ...
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  2. An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge, and Freedom.Bina Gupta - 2011 - Routledge.
    _An Introduction to Indian Philosophy_ offers a profound yet accessible survey of the development of India’s philosophical tradition. Beginning with the formation of Brahmanical, Jaina, Materialist, and Buddhist traditions, Bina Gupta guides the reader through the classical schools of Indian thought, culminating in a look at how these traditions inform Indian philosophy and society in modern times. Offering translations from source texts and clear explanations of philosophical terms, this text provides a rigorous overview of Indian philosophical contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, (...)
     
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  3. "Bhagavad Gītā" as Duty and Virtue Ethics: Some Reflections.Bina Gupta - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (3):373 - 395.
    The paper examines the ethical conception of the most well-known and much discussed Hindu text, the "Bhagavad Gītā", in the context of the Western distinction between duty ethics and virtue ethics. Most of the materials published on the "Gītā" make much of its conception of duty; however, there is no systematic investigation of the notion of virtue in the "Gītā". The paper begins with a discussion of the fundamental characteristics of virtue ethics, before undertaking a discussion of the conceptions of (...)
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  4. The Disinterested Witness. A Fragment of Advaita Vedanta phenomenology.Bina Gupta - 1999 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 189 (4):531-531.
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  5.  42
    Bhagavad G?Tā as Duty and Virtue Ethics.Bina Gupta - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (3):373-395.
    The paper examines the ethical conception of the most well-known and much discussed Hindu text, the "Bhagavad Gītā", in the context of the Western distinction between duty ethics and virtue ethics. Most of the materials published on the "Gītā" make much of its conception of duty; however, there is no systematic investigation of the notion of virtue in the "Gītā". The paper begins with a discussion of the fundamental characteristics of virtue ethics, before undertaking a discussion of the conceptions of (...)
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  6. Consciousness, Knowledge, and Ignorance: Prakasatman's Ellucidation of Five Parts.Bina Gupta - 2012 - Columbia University Press.
    The first English translation of the "First Section" --the "Section on Inquiry" --of the Pañacapadikavivaranam, a Sanskrit commentary offering a systematic exposition of Advaita Vedanta from the Vivarana perspective. The central question concerns the nature of ignorance, or not-knowing, and its relation to knowing. It discusses how ignorance obstructs the nature of reality; the locus and support of ignorance; and whether ignorance is a positive entity. Includes a detailed introduction, transliterated text, translation, and explanatory notes. Published by American Institute of (...)
     
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  7. "Tat Tvam Asi": An Important Identity Statement or a Mere Tautology.Bina Gupta & William C. Wilcox - 1984 - Philosophy East and West 34 (1):85-94.
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  8. Ātman_ (Self) and _Anātman (No-Self): A Possible Reconciliation.Bina Gupta - unknown
    In most common expositions of Indian philosophy the two traditions: self and no-self - are taken to be mutually incompatible. The former, having its origin in the Upaniṣads, finds expression in all āstikadarśanas , though its clearest and most important exposition is found in Advaita Vedānta. The latter having its origin in the teachings of the Buddha finds varied expressions in different schools of Buddhism. The Advaita Vedānta accepts ātman and rejects anattā ; the Buddhists argue for anattā and reject (...)
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  9. Reason and Experience in Indian Philosophy.Bina Gupta - 2009 - Motilal Banarsidass.
     
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  10.  34
    Phenomenological Analysis in Husserl and Rāmānuja: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW]Bina Gupta - 1982 - International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):19-32.
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  11. Perceiving in Advaita Vedanta Epistemological Analysis and Interpretation.Bina Gupta, N. S. Dharmarajadhvarindra & Anantakrishna Sastri - 1991 - Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
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  12.  21
    Alternative Forms of the Absolute: Truth Freedom, and Value in Bhattacharyya.Bina Gupta - 1980 - International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (3):291-306.
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  13.  74
    Advaita Vedānta and Husserl's Phenomenology.Bina Gupta - 2004 - Husserl Studies 20 (2):119-134.
  14. Philosophical Questions: East and West.Bina Gupta & J. N. Mohanty (eds.) - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophical Questions: East and West is an anthology of source material for use in comparative courses in philosophy, religion, and the humanities. The readings—derived from the great works of the Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Islamic, and Western intellectual traditions—are presented as answers to some of the most enduring questions in philosophy.
     
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  15.  32
    Buddha and Hume.Bina Gupta - 1977 - International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (2):135-146.
  16.  27
    The Place of Reason in Advaita Vedānta.Bina Gupta - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (3):293-307.
    It is commonly taken for granted that in Vedānta, as also in Indian philosophy in general, yukti, anumāna, and tarka, translate into “reason” (of Western thought) while śruti is rendered as “revelation.” I reject this translation-interpretation; it is a good example of theway in which Sanskrit philosophical discourse is often misconstrued. The term śruti does not refer to revelation, nor do yukti, anumāna, or tarka to reason. Reason, I argue, comprehends all the pramānas; these are all means of legitimizing beliefs. (...)
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  17.  9
    Buddha and Hume: A Popular Comparison Revisited.Bina Gupta - 1977 - International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (2):135-146.
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  18.  8
    If Journalists Were Vedantins..Bina Gupta - 2001 - Glimpse 3 (1):1-8.
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  19.  24
    Are All Names of the Absolute Synonymous?Bina Gupta & William C. Wilcox - 1983 - Philosophy East and West 33 (3):285-293.
  20.  10
    Are Hetvābhāsas Formal Fallacies?Bina Gupta - 1980 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (2):135-147.
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  21. Another Look at the Buddha - Hume "Connection".Bina Gupta - 1978 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 5 (3):371-386.
  22. Brahman, God, Substance, and Nature : Samkara and Spinoza.Bina Gupta - 1984 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 11 (3):265.
     
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  23. Ethical Questions: East and West.Bina Gupta - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Eastern Philosophy represents one of the most ancient intellectual traditions of human culture, yet it is generally ignored by Western philosophers. Today more than ever, the need for understanding in a global community should be stressed as the scope, scale, and complexity of social changes increase. Bina Gupta strives to obtain a harmonious balance between the two traditions in her book Ethical Questions: East and West. Both ancient and modern sources such as the Buddha, Aristotle, the Upanishads, Simone de Beauvoir, (...)
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  24. Skepticism : Ancient ‘East’ and Modern ‘West’.Bina Gupta - 1981 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 9 (1):29.
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  25. The Conception of the Self in Hume and Buddhism.Bina Gupta - 1975 - Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
  26.  10
    The Empirical and the Transcendental: A Fusion of Horizons.Bina Gupta (ed.) - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this work, a distinguished international group of philosophers offers critical assessments of eminent philosopher J. N. Mohanty's work on phenomenology and Indian philosophy. The concluding chapter by Mohanty responds to the critics and contains his assessment of his own philosophical position.
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