Results for 'Biological organization'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. What Makes Biological Organisation Teleological?Matteo Mossio & Leonardo Bich - 2017 - Synthese 194 (4):1089-1114.
    This paper argues that biological organisation can be legitimately conceived of as an intrinsically teleological causal regime. The core of the argument consists in establishing a connection between organisation and teleology through the concept of self-determination: biological organisation determines itself in the sense that the effects of its activity contribute to determine its own conditions of existence. We suggest that not any kind of circular regime realises self-determination, which should be specifically understood as self-constraint: in biological systems, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  2.  61
    Biological Organization and Cross-Generation Functions.C. Saborido, M. Mossio & A. Moreno - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):583-606.
    The organizational account of biological functions interprets functions as contributions of a trait to the maintenance of the organization that, in turn, maintains the trait. As has been recently argued, however, the account seems unable to provide a unified grounding for both intra- and cross-generation functions, since the latter do not contribute to the maintenance of the same organization which produces them. To face this ‘ontological problem’, a splitting account has been proposed, according to which the two (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  3.  9
    Gravity Constraints Drive Biological Systems Toward Specific Organization Patterns.Mariano Bizzarri, Maria Grazia Masiello, Alessandro Giuliani & Alessandra Cucina - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (1):1700138.
    Different cell lineages growing in microgravity undergo a spontaneous transition leading to the emergence of two distinct phenotypes. By returning these populations in a normal gravitational field, the two phenotypes collapse, recovering their original configuration. In this review, we hypothesize that, once the gravitational constraint is removed, the system freely explores its phenotypic space, while, when in a gravitational field, cells are “constrained” to adopt only one favored configuration. We suggest that the genome allows for a wide range of “possibilities” (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  3
    Conserving Functions Across Generations: Heredity in Light of Biological Organization.Matteo Mossio & Gaëlle Pontarotti - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    We develop a conceptual framework that connects biological heredity and organization. Heredity designates the cross-generation conservation of functional elements, defined as constraints subject to organizational closure. While hereditary objects are functional constituents of biological systems, any other entity that is stable across generations—and possibly involved in the recurrence of phenotypes—belongs to their environment. The central outcome of the organizational perspective consists in extending the scope of heredity beyond the genetic domain without merging it with the broad category (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  34
    Key Issues Regarding the Origin, Nature, and Evolution of Complexity in Nature: Information as a Central Concept to Understand Biological Organization.Alvaro Moreno & Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo - 2002 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 4 (1):63-76.
  6.  1
    Anticipation in Biological and Cognitive Systems: The Need for a Physical Theory of Biological Organization.Graziano Terenzi - 2008 - In World Scientific (ed.), Physics of Emergence and Organization. pp. 371.
  7.  9
    A Systemic Approach to the Origin of Biological Organization.Alvaro Moreno - 2007 - In Fred C. Boogerd, Frank J. Bruggeman, Jan-Hendrik S. Hofmeyr & Hans V. Westerhoff (eds.), Systems Biology: Philosophical Foundations. Elsevier. pp. 243--268.
  8.  28
    Thermodynamics of Flow and Biological Organization.A. Katchalsky - 1971 - Zygon 6 (2):99-125.
  9. On the Role of Constraints in the Emergence of Biological Organization.Leonardo Bich, Matteo Mossio & Alvaro Moreno - unknown
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Thoughts on the Problem of biological Organisation.J. Needham - 1932 - Scientia 26 (52):84.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  4
    Enzymes and Biological Organization.David E. Green & Johan Järnefelt - 1959 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 2 (2):163-184.
  12.  2
    A Proposal for a Force Essential to Biological Organization.A. S. Iberall - 1975 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 18 (3):399-404.
  13. Biological Organization and the Role of Theoretical Biology : Function and Autonomy.Arantza Etxeberria & Jon Umerez - 2009 - In González Recio & José Luis (eds.), Philosophical Essays on Physics and Biology. G. Olms.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  61
    The Uniqueness of Biological Self-Organization: Challenging the Darwinian Paradigm.J. B. Edelmann & M. J. Denton - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):579-601.
    Here we discuss the challenge posed by self-organization to the Darwinian conception of evolution. As we point out, natural selection can only be the major creative agency in evolution if all or most of the adaptive complexity manifest in living organisms is built up over many generations by the cumulative selection of naturally occurring small, random mutations or variants, i.e., additive, incremental steps over an extended period of time. Biological self-organization—witnessed classically in the folding of a protein, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  18
    Life and the Homeostatic Organization View of Biological Phenomena.Robert Arp - 2008 - Cosmos and History 4 (1-2):260-285.
    In this paper, I argue that starting with the organelles that constitute a cell – and continuing up the hierarchy of components in processes and subsystems of an organism – there are clear instances of emergent biological phenomena that can be considered “living” entities. These components and their attending processes are living emergent phenomena because of the way in which the components are organized to maintain homeostasis of the organism at the various levels in the hierarchy. I call this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  24
    Homeostatic Organization, Emergence, and Reduction in Biological Phenomena.Robert Arp - 2007 - Philosophia Naturalis 44 (2):238-270.
    In this paper, I argue that starting with the organelles that constitute a cell - and continuing up the hierarchy of components in processes and subsystems of an organism - there exist clear instances of emergent biological phenomena that can be considered,,living" entities. These components and their attending processes are living emergent phenomena because of the way in which the components are organized to maintain homeostasis of the organism at the various levels in the hierarchy. I call this view (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  33
    Biological Ontology and Hierarchical Organization: A Defence of Rank Freedom.Samir Okasha - 2011 - In Brett Calcott & Kim Sterelny (eds.), The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited. MIT Press. pp. 53--64.
    This chapter presents a displacement of the organism as a privileged level of analysis in evolutionary biology. It is concerned with the ontology of biology systems, with particular reference to hierarchical organization. It argues that the concept of a rank-free hierarchy can be transposed to the major transitions hierarchy, with interesting consequences. This chapter shows that the idea of rank freedom makes good sense of a number of facets of the recent discussion of evolutionary transitions and multilevel selection. It (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Organization in Biological Systems.John Collier - unknown
    Biological systems are typically hierarchically organized, open, nonlinear systems, and inherit all of the characteristics of such systems that are found in the purely physical and chemical domains, to which all biological systems belong. In addition, biological systems exhibit functional properties, and they contain information in a form that is used internally to make required functional distinctions. The existence of these additional biological properties is widely granted, but their exact nature is controversial. I will address first (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  4
    Hierarchical Recursive Organization and the Free Energy Principle: From Biological Self-Organization to the Psychoanalytic Mind.Patrick Connolly & Vasi van Deventer - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Evolutionary Systems Biological and Epistemological Perspectives on Selection and Self-Organization.Gertrudis van de Vijver, Stanley N. Salthe & Manuela Delpos - 1998
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  16
    Adaptive Ramification: Comparing Models for Biological, Economical, and Conceptual Organization.Y. L. Kergosien - 1990 - Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4):243-255.
  22.  18
    Levels of Organization, Selection, and Information Storage in Biological and Social Evaluation.Donald T. Campbell - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):236-237.
  23.  19
    A Suggestion for a Mathematical Expression for Biological and Social Organization.N. Rashevsky - 1946 - Acta Biotheoretica 8 (1-2):60-66.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  7
    Handedness and Cerebral Organization in Twins – Implications for the Biological Basis of Human Laterality.Sally P. Springer - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):316-317.
  25.  74
    An Organisational Approach to Biological Communication.Ramiro Frick, Leonardo Bich & Alvaro Moreno - 2019 - Acta Biotheoretica (2):103-128.
    This paper aims to provide a philosophical and theoretical account of biological communication grounded in the notion of organisation. The organisational approach characterises living systems as organised in such a way that they are capable to self-produce and self-maintain while in constant interaction with the environment. To apply this theoretical framework to the study of biological communication, we focus on a specific approach, based on the notion of influence, according to which communication takes place when a signal emitted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Complex Emergence and the Living Organization: An Epistemological Framework for Biology.Leonardo Bich - 2012 - Synthese 185 (2):215-232.
    In this article an epistemological framework is proposed in order to integrate the emergentist thought with systemic studies on biological autonomy, which are focused on the role of organization. Particular attention will be paid to the role of the observer’s activity, especially: (a) the different operations he performs in order to identify the pertinent elements at each descriptive level, and (b) the relationships between the different models he builds from them. According to the approach sustained here, organization (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  27.  55
    Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis.Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve the ultimate function of calibrating organisms (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  28.  30
    Biological Pathology From an Organizational Perspective.Cristian Saborido & Alvaro Moreno - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (1):83-95.
    In contrast to the “normativist” view, “naturalist” theorists claim that the concept of health refers to natural or normal states and propose different characterizations of healthy and diseased conditions that are meant to be objectivist and biologically grounded. In this article, we examine the core concept of these naturalist accounts of disease, i.e., the concept of biological malfunction, and develop a new formulation of the notion of malfunction following the recent organizational approach to functions in the philosophy of biology. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  50
    Reengineering Metaphysics: Modularity, Parthood, and Evolvability in Metabolic Engineering.Catherine Kendig & Todd T. Eckdahl - 2017 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 9 (8).
    The premise of biological modularity is an ontological claim that appears to come out of practice. We understand that the biological world is modular because we can manipulate different parts of organisms in ways that would only work if there were discrete parts that were interchangeable. This is the foundation of the BioBrick assembly method widely used in synthetic biology. It is one of a number of methods that allows practitioners to construct and reconstruct biological pathways and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  61
    Biological Regulation: Controlling the System From Within.Leonardo Bich, Matteo Mossio, Kepa Ruiz-Mirazo & Alvaro Moreno - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (2):237-265.
    Biological regulation is what allows an organism to handle the effects of a perturbation, modulating its own constitutive dynamics in response to particular changes in internal and external conditions. With the central focus of analysis on the case of minimal living systems, we argue that regulation consists in a specific form of second-order control, exerted over the core regime of production and maintenance of the components that actually put together the organism. The main argument is that regulation requires a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  31.  15
    The Significance of Levels of Organization for Scientific Research: A Heuristic Approach.Daniel S. Brooks & Markus I. Eronen - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 68:34-41.
    The concept of 'levels of organization' has come under fire recently as being useless for scientific and philosophical purposes. In this paper, we show that 'levels' is actually a remarkably resilient and constructive conceptual tool that can be, and in fact is, used for a variety of purposes. To this effect, we articulate an account of the importance of the levels concept seen in light of its status as a major organizing concept of biology. We argue that the usefulness (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Is the Cell Really a Machine?Daniel J. Nicholson - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical Biology 477:108–126.
    It has become customary to conceptualize the living cell as an intricate piece of machinery, different to a man-made machine only in terms of its superior complexity. This familiar understanding grounds the conviction that a cell's organization can be explained reductionistically, as well as the idea that its molecular pathways can be construed as deterministic circuits. The machine conception of the cell owes a great deal of its success to the methods traditionally used in molecular biology. However, the recent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. On Emergence, Agency, and Organization.Stuart Kauffman & Philip Clayton - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):501-521.
    Ultimately we will only understand biological agency when we have developed a theory of the organization of biological processes, and science is still a long way from attaining that goal. It may be possible nonetheless to develop a list of necessary conditions for the emergence of minimal biological agency. The authors offer a model of molecular autonomous agents which meets the five minimal physical conditions that are necessary (and, we believe, conjointly sufficient) for applying agential language (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  34.  60
    Biological Atomism and Cell Theory.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):202-211.
    Biological atomism postulates that all life is composed of elementary and indivisible vital units. The activity of a living organism is thus conceived as the result of the activities and interactions of its elementary constituents, each of which individually already exhibits all the attributes proper to life. This paper surveys some of the key episodes in the history of biological atomism, and situates cell theory within this tradition. The atomistic foundations of cell theory are subsequently dissected and discussed, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35.  79
    Natural Selection and Self-Organization.Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (1):33-65.
    The Darwinian concept of natural selection was conceived within a set of Newtonian background assumptions about systems dynamics. Mendelian genetics at first did not sit well with the gradualist assumptions of the Darwinian theory. Eventually, however, Mendelism and Darwinism were fused by reformulating natural selection in statistical terms. This reflected a shift to a more probabilistic set of background assumptions based upon Boltzmannian systems dynamics. Recent developments in molecular genetics and paleontology have put pressure on Darwinism once again. Current work (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  36.  20
    Robustness and Autonomy in Biological Systems: How Regulatory Mechanisms Enable Functional Integration, Complexity and Minimal Cognition Through the Action of Second-Order Control Constraints.Leonardo Bich - 2018 - In M. Bertolaso, S. Caianiello & E. Serrelli (eds.), Biological Robustness. Emerging Perspectives from within the Life Sciences. New York, USA: Springer. pp. 123-147.
    Living systems employ several mechanisms and behaviors to achieve robustness and maintain themselves under changing internal and external conditions. Regulation stands out from them as a specific form of higher-order control, exerted over the basic regime responsible for the production and maintenance of the organism, and provides the system with the capacity to act on its own constitutive dynamics. It consists in the capability to selectively shift between different available regimes of self-production and self-maintenance in response to specific signals and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  10
    Organisms and Organization.Marvalee H. Wake - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (3):213-223.
    Organisms are organized both internally and externally. The centrality of the organism in examination of the hierarchy of biological organization and the kinds of “emergent properties” that develop from study of organization at one level relative to other levels are my themes. That centrality has not often been implicit in discussion of unifying concepts, even evolution. Few general or unifying principles integrate information derived from various levels of biological organization. However, as the genetic toolbox and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  45
    Biological Complexity and the Dynamics of Life Processes.Jacques Ricard - 1999 - Elsevier.
    The aim of this book is to show how supramolecular complexity of cell organization can dramatically alter the functions of individual macromolecules within a cell. The emergence of new functions which appear as a consequence of supramolecular complexity, is explained in terms of physical chemistry. The book is interdisciplinary, at the border between cell biochemistry, physics and physical chemistry. This interdisciplinarity does not result in the use of physical techniques but from the use of physical concepts to study (...) problems. In the domain of complexity studies, most works are purely theoretical or based on computer simulation. The present book is partly theoretical, partly experimental and theory is always based on experimental results. Moreover, the book encompasses in a unified manner the dynamic aspects of many different biological fields ranging from dynamics to pattern emergence in a young embryo. The volume puts emphasis on dynamic physical studies of biological events. It also develops, in a unified perspective, this new interdisciplinary approach of various important problems of cell biology and chemistry, ranging from enzyme dynamics to pattern formation during embryo development, thus paving the way to what may become a central issue of future biology. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  42
    The Decline of Public Interest Agricultural Science and the Dubious Future of Crop Biological Control in California.Keith D. Warner, Kent M. Daane, Christina M. Getz, Stephen P. Maurano, Sandra Calderon & Kathleen A. Powers - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):483-496.
    Drawing from a four-year study of US science institutions that support biological control of arthropods, this article examines the decline in biological control institutional capacity in California within the context of both declining public interest science and declining agricultural research activism. After explaining how debates over the public interest character of biological control science have shaped institutions in California, we use scientometric methods to assess the present status and trends in biological control programs within both the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  9
    Understanding the Emergence of Cellular Organization.Walter Riofrio - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (3):361-377.
    More than one researcher is currently proposing that the notion of information become an important element for defining living systems as well as for explaining conditions that make their origins possible. During the pre-biotic era, the type of compounds encountered would mainly have been very simple in nature and might have been immersed in the natural dynamic of the physical world and in processes of self-organization. It is furthermore quite possible that they formed a relationship between and among certain (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  45
    Co-Emergences in Life and Science: A Double Proposal for Biological Emergentism. [REVIEW]Luisa Damiano - 2012 - Synthese 185 (2):273-294.
    This article addresses the problem of emergence through a distinction, often neglected in the literature, between two different aspects of this issue: (1) the theoretical problem of providing modelizations able to explain the expression of emergent properties; (2) the epistemological problem of warranting the scientific value of the emergentist descriptions of nature. This paper considers this double issue with regard to the biological domain, and proposes a double solution (theoretical and epistemological) originally developed in early studies on self-organization. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  24
    Single-Cell Hi-C Bridges Microscopy and Genome-Wide Sequencing Approaches to Study 3D Chromatin Organization.V. Ulianov Sergey, Tachibana‐Konwalski Kikue & V. Razin Sergey - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700104.
    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of the single-cell biochemical toolbox including chromosome conformation capture -based methods that provide novel insights into chromatin spatial organization in individual cells. The observations made with these techniques revealed that topologically associating domains emerge from cell population averages and do not exist as static structures in individual cells. Stochastic nature of the genome folding is likely to be biologically relevant and may reflect the ability of chromatin fibers to adopt a number of alternative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  18
    Single-Cell Hi-C Bridges Microscopy and Genome-Wide Sequencing Approaches to Study 3D Chromatin Organization.Sergey V. Ulianov, Kikue Tachibana-Konwalski & Sergey V. Razin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700104.
    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of the single-cell biochemical toolbox including chromosome conformation capture -based methods that provide novel insights into chromatin spatial organization in individual cells. The observations made with these techniques revealed that topologically associating domains emerge from cell population averages and do not exist as static structures in individual cells. Stochastic nature of the genome folding is likely to be biologically relevant and may reflect the ability of chromatin fibers to adopt a number of alternative (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  13
    Interdisciplinarity, Transdisciplinarity, and Beyond: The Brain, Story Sharing, and Social Organization.Paul Grobstein - 2007 - Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M21.
    An apparent conflict between preferences for hierarchical as opposed to distributed organizations is evident in arguments about disciplinary and interdisciplinary organization. It characterizes as well a wide array of other arenas ranging from the biological to the political. In this article, parallels between biological, neurobiological, and social observations are explored in an effort to outline a general approach that may be useful in thinking about interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary activities as well as forms of social organization in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  57
    Biological Autonomy. A Philosophical and Theoretical Enquiry.Alvaro Moreno & Matteo Mossio - 2015 - Springer.
    Since Darwin, Biology has been framed on the idea of evolution by natural selection, which has profoundly influenced the scientific and philosophical comprehension of biological phenomena and of our place in Nature. This book argues that contemporary biology should progress towards and revolve around an even more fundamental idea, that of autonomy. Biological autonomy describes living organisms as organised systems, which are able to self-produce and self-maintain as integrated entities, to establish their own goals and norms, and to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  46.  22
    From Biological Determination to Entangled Causation.Davide Vecchi, Paul-Antoine Miquel & Isaac Hernández - 2019 - Acta Biotheoretica 67 (1):19-46.
    Biologists and philosophers often use the language of determination in order to describe the nature of developmental phenomena. Accounts in terms of determination have often been reductionist. One common idea is that DNA is supposed to play a special explanatory role in developmental explanations, namely, that DNA is a developmental determinant. In this article we try to make sense of determination claims in developmental biology. Adopting a manipulationist approach, we shall first argue that the notion of developmental determinant is causal. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  41
    Physics of Emergence and Organization.Ignazio Licata & Ammar Sakaji (eds.) - 2008 - World Scientific.
    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the Physics of Emergence. Foreword v Gregory J. Chaitin Preface vii Ignazio Licata Emergence and Computation at the Edge of Classical and Quantum Systems 1 Ignazio Licata Gauge Generalized Principle for Complex Systems 27 Germano Resconi Undoing Quantum Measurement: Novel Twists to the Physical Account of Time 61 Avshalom C. Elitzur and Shahar Dolev Process Physics: Quantum Theories as Models of Complexity 77 Kirsty Kitto A Cross-disciplinary Framework for the Description of Contextually Mediated (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  27
    The Diffuse Organism as the First Biological System.Nikolay P. Kolomiytsev & Nadezhda Ya Poddubnaya - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (1):67-78.
    This article presents a new hypothesis on the origin of life on Earth. According to this hypothesis, life arose within the limits of a particular material system representing a set of specific local environments integrated by a common circulating liquid medium where relatively short RNA molecules, viroid-like particles, are replicated with great accuracy. In each of the local environments, the synthesis of certain substances that are required for accurate replication and survival of the RNAs is carried out. The system, which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  3
    Extended Inheritance as Reconstruction of Extended Organization: The Paradigmatic Case of Symbiosis.Gaëlle Pontarotti - 2016 - Lato Sensu, Revue de la Société de Philosophie des Sciences 3 (1).
    The paper outlines the contours of an organizational perspective on extended inheritance. Based on theoretical studies about biological organization and extended physiology, this perspective allows for the conception of extended biological legacies while keeping a theoretically indispensable distinction between biological systems and their environment. In this context, the line of demarcation between these systems and their surroundings is modelled on an organizational criterion and on the related conceptual distinction between organizational constraints, whose specific role is to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. An Organizational Account of Biological Functions.Matteo Mossio, Cristian Saborido & Alvaro Moreno - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (4):813-841.
    In this paper, we develop an organizational account that defines biological functions as causal relations subject to closure in living systems, interpreted as the most typical example of organizationally closed and differentiated self-maintaining systems. We argue that this account adequately grounds the teleological and normative dimensions of functions in the current organization of a system, insofar as it provides an explanation for the existence of the function bearer and, at the same time, identifies in a non-arbitrary way the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000