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    Physicians on the Frontlines: Understanding the Lived Experience of Physicians Working in Communities That Experienced a Mass Casualty Shooting.Kathleen M. O'Neill, Blake N. Shultz, Carolyn T. Lye, Megan L. Ranney, Gail D'Onofrio & Edouard Coupet - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):55-66.
    This qualitative study describes the lived experience of physicians who work in communities that have experienced a public mass shooting. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seventeen physicians involved in eight separate mass casualty shooting incidents in the United States. Four major themes emerged from constant comparative analysis: The psychological toll on physicians: “I wonder if I'm broken”; the importance of and need for mass casualty shooting preparedness: “[We need to] recognize this as a public health concern and train physicians to (...)
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    The “Rules of the Road”: Ethics, Firearms, and the Physician's “Lane”.Blake N. Shultz, Benjamin Tolchin & Katherine L. Kraschel - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):142-145.
    Physicians play a critical role in preventing and treating firearm injury, although the scope of that role remains contentious and lacks systematic definition. This piece aims to utilize the fundamental principles of medical ethics to present a framework for physician involvement in firearm violence. Physicians' agency relationship with their patients creates ethical obligations grounded on three principles of medical ethics — patient autonomy, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. Taken together, they suggest that physicians ought to engage in clinical screening and treatment related (...)
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  3. Understanding the Role of Law in Reducing Firearm Injury Through Clinical Interventions.Blake N. Shultz, Carolyn T. Lye, Gail D'Onofrio, Abbe R. Gluck, Jonathan Miller, Katherine L. Kraschel & Megan L. Ranney - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S4):146-154.
    Firearm injury in the United States is a public health crisis in which physicians are uniquely situated to intervene. However, their ability to mitigate harm is limited by a complex array of laws and regulations that shape their role in firearm injury prevention. This piece uses four clinical scenarios to illustrate how these laws and regulations impact physician practice, including patient counseling, injury reporting, and the use of court orders and involuntary holds. Unintended consequences on clinical practice of laws intended (...)
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