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  1.  40
    Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions. [REVIEW]Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659 - 680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers' attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer's perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting.Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions of the International (...)
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  2.  72
    Social Responsibility and the Olympic Games: The Mediating Role of Consumer Attributions.Matthew Walker, Bob Heere, Milena M. Parent & Dan Drane - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):659-680.
    Current literature suggests that corporate social responsibility (CSR) can affect consumers’ attitudes towards an organization and is regarded as a driver for reputation-building and fostering sustained consumer patronage. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of CSR on consumer responses, this research examined the mediating influence of consumer’s perceived organizational motives within an NGO setting. Given the heightened public attention surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, data were collected from consumers of the Games to assess their perceptions of the (...)
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    Evaluating a Socially Responsible Employment Program: Beneficiary Impacts and Stakeholder Perceptions.Matthew Walker, Stephen Hills & Bob Heere - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):53-70.
    Although many organizations around the world have engaged in corporate social responsibility programing, there is little evidence of social impact. This is a problematic omission since many programs carry the stigma of marketing ploys used to bolster organizational image or reduce consumer skepticism. To address this issue and build on existing scholarship, the purpose of this study was to evaluate a socially responsible youth employability program in the United Kingdom. The program was developed through the foundation of a professional British (...)
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