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  1.  28
    Moral Agency, Autonomy, and Heteronomy in Early Confucian Philosophy.Bongrae Seok - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (12):e12460.
    This paper discusses Confucian notions of moral autonomy and moral agency that do not follow strict and ideal notions of autonomy that one can find in many Western theories of moral philosophy. In Kantian deontology, for example, one's autonomy, specifically one's rational will to follow universal moral rules, is a necessary condition of moral agency and moral responsibility. In Confucian moral philosophy, however, this type of strict moral autonomy is rarely observed. A Confucian moral agent is often depicted as a (...)
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  2.  17
    Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy.Bongrae Seok - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    The body is not a physical reservoir or temporary means of cognitive processes but the part and parcel of our cognitive and moral life. Confucian philosophy provides insightful discussions and examples of how the body serves the moral mind not only causally but also constitutionally.
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  3.  11
    David Wong’s Interpretation of Confucian Moral Psychology.Bongrae Seok - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (4):559-575.
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  4.  30
    Mencius's Vertical Faculties and Moral Nativism.Bongrae Seok - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (1):51 – 68.
    This paper compares and contrasts Mencius's moral philosophy with recent development in cognitive science regarding mental capacity to understand moral rules and principles. Several cognitive scientists argue that the human mind has innate cognitive and emotive foundations of morality. In this paper, Mencius's moral theory is interpreted from the perspective of faculty psychology and cognitive modularity, a theoretical hypothesis in cognitive science in which the mind is understood as a system of specialized mental components. Specifically, Mencius's Four Beginnings (the basic (...)
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  5.  24
    Diversity and Unity of Modularity.Bongrae Seok - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (2):347-380.
    Since the publication of Fodor's (1983) The Modularity of Mind, there have been quite a few discussions of cognitive modularity among cognitive scientists. Generally, in those discussions, modularity means a property of specialized cognitive processes or a domain-specific body of information. In actuality, scholars understand modularity in many different ways. Different characterizations of modularity and modules were proposed and discussed, but they created misunderstanding and confusion. In this article, I classified and analyzed different approaches to modularity and argued for the (...)
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  6.  28
    Change, Contradiction, and Overconfidence: Chinese Philosophy and Cognitive Peculiarities of Asians.Bongrae Seok - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (3):221-237.
    This article discusses philosophical influence, especially the influence made by Confucianism and Daoism, on the way Asian people see and understand the world. Recently, Richard Nisbett drew a connection between Chinese philosophy (Confucianism and Daoism) and the cognitive profiles of the people who live in Asian countries where Confucianism and Daoism are strong social and cultural traditions. He argues that there is a peculiar way that Asians think and perceive things and this cognitive pattern is influenced by a group of (...)
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  7.  1
    Mind and Body in Early China: Beyond Orientalism and the Myth of Holism by Edward Slingerland.Bongrae Seok - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):1-6.
    In this book, Edward Slingerland criticizes and rejects a pervasive and widely accepted viewpoint in Chinese philosophy: holism. Simply speaking, holism is a non-discrete and non-analytic pattern of thinking that avoids the adoption of mutually exclusive and dualistic concepts such as mind-body, theory-practice, reason-emotion, and macrocosm-microcosm typically found in many Western philosophical theories. In the context of Chinese philosophy, it is understood as an interpretational framework where Chinese philosophy is characterized as a fundamentally and essentially non-dualistic system of thought. According (...)
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  8.  6
    Moral Psychology of Vulnerability and Ing's Interpretation of Confucian Moral Integrity.Bongrae Seok - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (3):391-400.
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  9.  8
    Katrin Froese. Ethics Unbound: Chinese and Western Perspectives on Morality.Bongrae Seok - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):157-161.
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  10.  8
    Moral Geography and Exploration of the Moral Possibility Space.Bongrae Seok - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (2):173-177.
    This article reviews Owen Flanagan’s latest book “The Geography of Morals, Varieties of Moral Possibilities”. By exploring the space of moral possibility, Flanagan argues that ethics is not simply a study of a priori conditions of normative rules and ideal values but a process of developing a careful understanding of varying conditions of human ecology and building practical views on living good life. The goal of this geographical exploration of the moral possibility space is surveying different traditions of morality and (...)
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  11.  5
    Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy by Franklin Perkins.Bongrae Seok - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1377-1380.
    Why do bad things happen to good people? Why isn’t good moral intention always rewarded? Franklin Perkins discusses these challenging questions about good and evil in his recent book Heaven and Earth Are not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. As the title suggests, Perkins focuses on the unique Chinese notion of heaven and its related philosophical issues of undeserved misfortune and limited moral efficacy. The subtitle of the book is equally intriguing. Perkins discusses these philosophical issues (...)
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  12. Modularity of Mind, Encapsulation by Nature.Bongrae Seok - 2000 - Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, philosophers have studied functional structure of human mind. So called 'faculty psychology' is the study of innate structure of human cognition. However, it is Gall's theory of faculties that started the study of domain specific and autonomous units of human mind. This dissertation discusses modularity of mind, i.e., the idea that mind consists of such domain specific and autonomous units, i.e., cognitive modules. ;In the first of the dissertation, I discuss faculty psychology as (...)
     
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  13. Moral Psychology of Confucian Shame: Shame of Shamelessness.Bongrae Seok - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book offers an analysis of shame and develops an interdisciplinary and comparative interpretation of Confucian shame as a moral disposition, the ability of critical moral-development and self-cultivation.
     
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  14.  5
    Naturalism, Human Flourishing, and Asian Philosophy.Bongrae Seok (ed.) - 2019 - Routledge.
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