Results for 'Boredom'

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Bibliography: Boredom in Normative Ethics
  1. Is Profound Boredom Boredom?Andreas Elpidorou & Lauren Freeman - 2019 - In Christos Hadjioannou (ed.), Heidegger on Affect. Palgrave.
    Martin Heidegger is often credited as having offered one of the most thorough phenomenological investigations of the nature of boredom. In his 1929–1930 lecture course, The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude, he goes to great lengths to distinguish between three different types of boredom and to explicate their respective characters. Within the context of his discussion of one of these types of boredom, profound boredom [tiefe Langweile], Heidegger opposes much of the philosophical and literary (...)
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  2. The Good of Boredom.Andreas Elpidorou - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):323-351.
    I argue that the state of boredom (i.e., the transitory and non-pathological experience of boredom) should be understood to be a regulatory psychological state that has the capacity to promote our well-being by contributing to personal growth and to the construction (or reconstruction) of a meaningful life.
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  3. The Bored Mind is a Guiding Mind: Toward a Regulatory Theory of Boredom.Andreas Elpidorou - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):455-484.
    By presenting and synthesizing findings on the character of boredom, the article advances a theoretical account of the function of the state of boredom. The article argues that the state of boredom should be understood as a functional emotion that is both informative and regulatory of one's behavior. Boredom informs one of the presence of an unsatisfactory situation and, at the same time, it motivates one to pursue a new goal when the current goal ceases to (...)
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  4.  77
    Is Boredom One or Many? A Functional Solution to the Problem of Heterogeneity.Andreas Elpidorou - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    Despite great progress in our theoretical and empirical investigations of boredom, a basic issue regarding boredom remains unresolved: it is still unclear whether the construct of boredom is a unitary one or not. By surveying the relevant literature on boredom and arousal, the paper makes a case for the unity of the construct of boredom. It argues, first, that extant empirical findings do not support the heterogeneity of boredom, and, second, that a theoretically motivated (...)
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  5. The Significance of Boredom: A Sartrean Reading.Andreas Elpidorou - 2015 - In Daniel Dahlstrom, Andreas Elpidorou & Walter Hopp (eds.), Philosophy of Mind and Phenomenology: Conceptual and Empirical Approaches. Routledge.
    By examining boredom through the lens of Sartre’s account of the emotions, I argue for the significance of boredom. Boredom matters, I show, for it is both informative and regulatory of one’s behavior: it informs one of the presence of an unsatisfactory situation; and, at the same time, owing to its affective, cognitive, and volitional character, boredom motivates the pursuit of a new goal when the current goal ceases to be satisfactory, attractive, or meaningful. In the (...)
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  6. The Moral Dimensions of Boredom: A Call for Research.Andreas Elpidorou - 2017 - Review of General Psychology 1.
    Despite the impressive progress that has been made on both the empirical and conceptual fronts of boredom research, there is one facet of boredom that has received remarkably little attention. This is boredom's relationship to morality. The aim of this article is to explore the moral dimensions of boredom and to argue that boredom is a morally relevant personality trait. The presence of trait boredom hinders our capacity to flourish and in doing so hurts (...)
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  7. Immortality and Boredom.John Martin Fischer & Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    In this paper, we aim to clarify and evaluate the contention that immortality would be necessarily boring . It will emerge that, just as there are various importantly different kinds of immortality, there are various distinct kinds of boredom. To evaluate the Necessary Boredom Thesis, we need to specify the kind of immortality and the kind of boredom. We argue against the thesis, on various specifications of “immortality” and “boredom.”.
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  8. Eternity, Boredom, and One’s Part-Whole-Reality Conception.William Lauinger - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):1-28.
    Bernard Williams famously argued that eternal life is undesirable for a human because it would inevitably grow intolerably boring. I will argue against Williams and those who share his view. To make my case, I will provide an account of what staves off boredom in our current, earthly-mortal lives, and then I will draw on this account while advancing reasons for thinking that eternal life is desirable, given certain conditions. Though my response to Williams will partly overlap with some (...)
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  9. Affectivity in Heidegger II: Temporality, Boredom, and Beyond.Lauren Freeman & Andreas Elpidorou - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (10):672-684.
    In ‘Affectivity in Heidegger I: Moods and Emotions in Being and Time’, we explicated the crucial role that Martin Heidegger assigns to our capacity to affectively find ourselves in the world. There, our discussion was restricted to Division I of Being and Time. Specifically, we discussed how Befindlichkeit as a basic existential and moods as the ontic counterparts of Befindlichkeit make circumspective engagement with the world possible. Indeed, according to Heidegger, it is primarily through moods that the world is ‘opened (...)
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  10. God and Eternal Boredom.Vuko Andrić & Attila Tanyi - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (1):51-70.
    God is thought to be eternal. Does this mean that he is timeless? Or is he, rather, omnitemporal? In this paper we want to show that God cannot be omnitemporal. Our starting point, which we take from Bernard Williams’ article on the Makropulos Case, is the intuition that it is inappropriate for persons not to become bored after a sufficiently long sequence of time has passed. If God were omnitemporal, he would suffer from boredom. But God is the greatest (...)
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  11. Immortality Without Boredom.Lisa Bortolotti & Yujin Nagasawa - 2009 - Ratio 22 (3):261-277.
    In this paper we address Bernard Williams' argument for the undesirability of immortality. Williams argues that unavoidable and pervasive boredom would characterise the immortal life of an individual with unchanging categorical desires. We resist this conclusion on the basis of the distinction between habitual and situational boredom and a psychologically realistic account of significant factors in the formation of boredom. We conclude that Williams has offered no persuasive argument for the necessity of boredom in the immortal (...)
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  12.  42
    A Philosophy of Boredom.Lars Svendsen - 2005 - Reaktion Books.
    In this book Lars Svendsen examines the nature of boredom, how it originated, its history, how and why it afflicts us, and why we cannot seem to overcome it by any act of will.
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  13. Living with Boredom.Cheshire Calhoun - 2011 - Sophia 50 (2):269-279.
    The aim of this essay is to argue that the human capacity for boredom is philosophically interesting because it illuminates the kinds of problems that evaluators face just in being evaluators. I aim to challenge the “boredom as problem” approach to understanding boredom that is pervasive throughout the multi-disciplinary literature on boredom. I examine five quite different contexts of boredom that illuminate five different reasons why evaluators sometimes find the world not worth their attention and (...)
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  14.  42
    Simmel on Acceleration, Boredom, and Extreme Aesthesia.Kevin Aho - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):447-462.
    By focusing on the unique velocity and over-stimulation of metropolitan life, Georg Simmel pioneered an interpretation of cultural boredom that has had a significant impact on contemporary social theory by viewing it through the modern experience of time-pressure and social acceleration. This paper explores Simmel's account of boredom by showing how--in the frenzy of modern life--it has become increasingly difficult to qualitatively distinguish which choices and commitments actually matter to us. Furthermore, this emotional indifference invariably pushes us towards (...)
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  15.  67
    Heidegger's Phenomenology of Boredom, and the Scientific Investigation of Conscious Experience.Sue P. Stafford & Wanda Torres Gregory - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):155-169.
    This paper argues that Heidegger's phenomenology of boredom in The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude (1983) could be a promising addition to the ‘toolbox’ of scientists investigating conscious experience. We describe Heidegger's methodological principles and show how he applies these in describing three forms of boredom. Each form is shown to have two structural moments – being held in limbo and being left empty – as well as a characteristic relation to passing the time. In our (...)
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  16.  52
    Boredom and the Divided Mind.Vida Yao - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (4):937-957.
    On one predominant conception of virtue, the virtuous agent is, among other things, wholehearted in doing what she believes best. I challenge this condition of wholeheartedness by making explicit the connections between the emotion of boredom and the states of continence and akrasia. An easily bored person is more susceptible to these forms of disharmony because of two familiar characteristics of boredom. First, that we can be – and often are – bored by what it is that we (...)
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  17.  69
    The Concept of Profound Boredom: Learning From Moments of Vision.Paul Gibbs - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):601-613.
    This paper recognizes that we become bored in our post-modern, consumerist Western world and that boredom is related to this existence and hidden within it. Through Heidegger, it seeks to provide a way to structure our understanding of boredom and suggest ways of acknowledging its cause, and then to allow it to liberate our authentic appreciation of the world of our workplace and what can be learnt through it. Using the approach of focusing on being in a societal (...)
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  18. Immortality and Boredom: A Response to Wisnewski.Mikel Burley - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (2):77-85.
    This article contributes to the ongoing debate initiated by Bernard Williams’ claim that, due to the non-contingent finitude of the categorical desires that give meaning to our lives, an immortal life would necessarily become intolerably boring. Jeremy Wisnewski has argued that even if immortality involves periods in which our categorical desires have been exhausted, this need not divest life of meaning since some categorical desires are revivable. I argue that careful reflection upon the thought-experiments adduced by Wisnewski reveals that they (...)
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  19.  60
    The Bright Side of Boredom.Andreas Elpidorou - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  20. Should I Choose to Never Die? Williams, Boredom, and the Significance of Mortality.David Beglin - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (8):2009-2028.
    Bernard Williams’ discussion of immortality in “The Makropulos Case: Reflections on the Tedium of Immortality” has spawned an entire philosophical literature. This literature tends to focus on one of Williams’ central claims: if we were to relinquish our mortality, we would necessarily become alienated from our existence and environment—“bored,” in his terms. Many theorists have defended this claim; many others have challenged it. Even if this claim is false, though, it still isn’t obvious that we should choose to relinquish our (...)
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  21.  28
    Boredom in Art.Andreas Elpidorou - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
  22.  45
    Can Boredom Educate Us? Tracing a Mood in Heidegger’s Fundamental Ontology From an Educational Point of View.Jan-Erik Mansikka - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (3):255-268.
  23.  22
    Studies on the Psychophysiology of Boredom: Part 2. The Effect of a Lowered Room Temperature and an Added Incentive on Blood Pressure, Report of Boredom, and Other Factors.J. E. Barmack - 1939 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (6):634.
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  24.  8
    Studies on the Psychophysiology of Boredom: Part I. The Effect of 15 Mgs. Of Benzedrine Sulfate and 60 Mgs. Of Ephedrine Hydrochloride on Blood Pressure, Report of Boredom and Other Factors. [REVIEW]J. E. Barmack - 1939 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 25 (5):494.
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  25. Boredom.W. O'Brien - 2014 - Analysis 74 (2):236-244.
    The author proposes an analysis of boredom. The analysis he proposes is that boredom is an unpleasant mental state consisting of weariness, restlessness, and lack of interest, where certain causal relations exist among the components. He goes on to elaborate on and defend his analysis, concluding with some thoughts on the idea that boredom has some grand metaphysical significance.
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  26.  14
    Meaning, Lived Experience, Empathy and Boredom: Max van Manen on Phenomenology and Heidegger.John Paley - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (3):e12211.
    Phenomenology as Qualitative Research: A Critical Analysis of Meaning Attribution has attracted the attention of Max van Manen, who has published a highly critical review article. Anyone reading this article, but unfamiliar with the book, will get a distorted view of what it is about, whom it is addressed to, what it tries to achieve, and how it goes about presenting its arguments. Not mildly distorted, in need of the odd correction here and there, but systematically misrepresented. One problem is (...)
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  27.  11
    Cognitive and Affective Predictors of Boredom Proneness.Julia Isacescu, Andriy Anatolievich Struk & James Danckert - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (8):1741-1748.
    Boredom proneness has been linked to various forms of cognitive and affective dysregulation including poor self-control and mind-wandering, as well as depression and aggression. As such, understanding boredom and the associated cognitive and affective components of the experience, represents an important first step in combatting the consequences of boredom for psychological well-being. We surveyed 1928 undergraduate students on measures of boredom proneness, self-control, MW, depression and aggression to investigate how these constructs were related. Hierarchical regression analysis (...)
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  28. Boredom: A Lively History.Peter Toohey - 2012 - Yale University Press.
    In the first book to argue for the benefits of boredom, Peter Toohey dispels the myth that it's simply a childish emotion or an existential malaise like Jean-Paul Sartre's nausea. He shows how boredom is, in fact, one of our most common and constructive emotions and is an essential part of the human experience. This informative and entertaining investigation of boredom—what it is and what it isn't, its uses and its dangers—spans more than 3,000 years of history (...)
     
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  29. Boredom: A Lively History.Peter Toohey - 2011 - Yale University Press.
    In the first book to argue for the benefits of boredom, Peter Toohey dispels the myth that it's simply a childish emotion or an existential malaise like Jean-Paul Sartre's nausea. He shows how boredom is, in fact, one of our most common and constructive emotions and is an essential part of the human experience. This informative and entertaining investigation of boredom—what it is and what it isn't, its uses and its dangers—spans more than 3,000 years of history (...)
     
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  30.  24
    On Boredom and Experimentation in Humans.Lavonia Smith LeBeau & Amedeo D'Angiulli - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (2):167-176.
    This article discusses the ethical and methodological issues associated with boredom experienced by human participants during psychological experiments. Ways are suggested in which informed consent, briefing, and debriefing can be used to prevent or remedy boredom induced during experiments. We address methodological and ethical concerns, and we discuss the advantages of the proposed approach for experimenters' practice and training of undergraduate students. Future directions for much needed research on these topics are also emphasized.
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  31.  64
    Existential Boredom: The Experience of Living on Haemodialysis Therapy.A. Moran, P. A. Scott & P. Darbyshire - 2009 - Medical Humanities 35 (2):70-75.
    Empathy is an essential component of professional nursing practice. In order to empathise appropriately with patients, it is crucial that nurses appreciate, understand and respond to their patients’ experience of illness. This study sought to explore the experiences of 16 people with end stage renal disease on haemodialysis therapy in Ireland. A hermeneutical phenomenological methodology was employed incorporating qualitative interviews. The data were analysed using qualitative interpretive analysis. The experience of waiting was significant for the participants in the study. The (...)
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  32. Temporality and Boredom.Victor Biceaga - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):135-153.
    In this paper, I argue that Heidegger’s phenomenological investigation of boredom offers important clues for better understanding the notoriously difficult notion of non-objectifying intentionality (Längsintentionalität). I begin by examining Husserl’s account of the aporetic nature of self-temporalization and I claim that a discussion of moods can further clarify the relation between Längsintentionalität and the absolute time-constituting consciousness. Although Husserl himself broached the problem of the intentionality of moods, it was Heidegger who gave us a full-blown account of it. I (...)
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  33.  62
    The Study of Life Boredom.Richard Bargdill - 2000 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 31 (2):188-219.
    This article extends the study of a phenomenological investigation in which six participants wrote protocols and gave interviews describing the experience of being bored with their lives. This study found that the participants gradually became bored after they had compromised their life-projects for less desired projects. The participants felt emotionally ambivalent because they were thematically angry with others involved in their compromises while being pre-reflectively angry with themselves. The participants non-thematically adopted passive and avoidant stances toward their lives that allowed (...)
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  34.  6
    ‘The Alexandrian Condition’: Suits on Boredom, Death, and Utopian Games.Christopher C. Yorke - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):363-371.
    ABSTRACTI argue that the apparently exclusive choice between Suits’ utopia of gameplay and death by suicide is a false dilemma, one which obscures a ‘third way’ of positive boredom. Further, I offe...
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  35.  81
    Sartre and Kierkegaard on the Aesthetics of Boredom.Farhang Erfani - 2004 - Idealistic Studies 34 (3):303-317.
    This paper analyzes two inauthentic approaches to the problem of boredom from Sartre’s and Kierkegaard’s perpectives. I maintain that their narratives—Nausea and “The “Seducer’s Diary”—fit this problem perfectly, as it is through narratives that we appreciate and learn to avoid boredom. I also submit that their solutions are doomed to failure because they attempt to be the sole authors of their own stories, without making room for alterity.
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  36.  8
    Henri Lefebvre and the 'Sociology of Boredom'.M. E. Gardiner - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (2):37-62.
    hat is arguably central to his ‘critique of everyday life’ but has been entirely overlooked in the literature thus far: that of boredom. Although often dismissed as trivial, boredom can be understood as a touchstone through which we can grasp much wider anxieties, socio-cultural changes and subjective crises that are intrinsic to our experience of modernity. Curiously, although Lefebvre was very interested in boredom, he did not analyse it systematically, and he used terms like ‘boring’ or ‘ (...)’ in loose, elliptical and seemingly contradictory ways. Such a lack of clarity reveals his ambivalence about this phenomenon, but also highlights a subtle pattern of differentiation he makes between particular modalities of boredom that can be highly illuminating. Through a careful reading of the full range of Lefebvre’s writings, we can begin to understand how he discriminates between different experiences and expressions of boredom, some of which are unambiguously negative, whereas others are judged more positively. With respect to the latter, as he says in Introduction to Modernity, under certain conditions boredom can be full of desires, frustrations and possibilities. Through such an investigation, we start to glimpse latent connections between boredom and utopian propensities that caught the attention not only of Lefebvre but also such thinkers as Ernst Bloch, Siegfried Kracauer and Walter Benjamin. (shrink)
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  37.  10
    Nietzsche's New Happiness: Longing, Boredom, and the Elusiveness of Fulfillment.Bernard Reginster - 2007 - Philosophic Exchange 37 (1).
    At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the elusiveness of fulfillment was a source of much perplexity. You believe that the possession of something that you desire will bring you fulfillment, but the acquisition of it leaves you dissatisfied. Arthur Schopenhauer said that this is because the objects of desire lack any intrinsic value. By contrast, Nietzsche argued that our experience of boredom reflects our desire to engage in a challenging form of activity.
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  38.  5
    Living in the Moment: Boredom and the Meaning of Existence in Heidegger and Pessoa.Jan Slaby - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):235-256.
    It was not only in his infamous speeches as NSDAP-approved Führer- Rektor of Freiburg University that Heidegger advocated what can be seen as an ‘activist’ understanding of human existence. To exist, according to this approach, means to be called upon to take charge of one’s life - actively, responsibly, authentically - whether mandated by Volk and Führer or not. Heideggerian resoluteness amounts to being active in a deep sense, a view articulated during the Rektoratszeit in the form of an outright (...)
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  39. Boredom.Wendell O'Brien - 2018 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Boredom: A History of Western Philosophical Perspectives The essayist Joseph Epstein has remarked, "Boredom is after all part of consciousness, and about consciousness the neurologists still have much less to tell us than do the poets and the philosophers." Although not a major topic for Western philosophers, some important Western philosophers have spoken of it, … Continue reading Boredom →.
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  40.  9
    Bakhtin, Boredom, and the ‘Democratization of Skepticism’.Michael E. Gardiner - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (2):163-184.
    This article examines recent scholarly work on boredom by drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin’s account of modernity, irony, and mass skepticism. In The Arcades Project, Walter Benjamin noted that, beginning in the 1840s, Western societies had been gripped by an “epidemic of boredom.” He was referring to a peculiarly modern form of mass boredom, associated with the “atrophy of experience” in a mechanized and urbanized social life—a boredom Elizabeth S. Goodstein has characterized as the “democratization of skepticism.” (...)
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  41. A Philosophy of Boredom.John Irons (ed.) - 2005 - Reaktion Books.
    It has been described as a "tame longing without any particular object" by Schopenhauer, "a bestial and indefinable affliction" by Dostoevsky, and "time's invasion of your world system" by Joseph Brodsky, but still very few of us today can explain precisely what boredom is. _A Philosophy of Boredom_ investigates one of the central preoccupations of our age as it probes the nature of boredom, how it originated, how and why it afflicts us, and why we cannot seem to (...)
     
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  42. Wish I Were Here: Boredom and the Interface.Mark Kingwell - 2019 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Are you bored of the endless scroll of your social media feed? Do you swipe left before considering the human being whose face you just summarily rejected? Do you skim articles on your screen in search of intellectual stimulation that never arrives? If so, this book is the philosophical lifeline you have been waiting for. Offering a timely meditation on the profound effects of constant immersion in technology, also known as the Interface, Wish I Were Here draws on philosophical analysis (...)
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  43.  11
    A Self-Regulatory Approach to Understanding Boredom Proneness.A. A. Struk, A. A. Scholer & J. Danckert - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (8).
  44.  38
    Failure of Boredom: The Pendulum of Composition as Identity.Claudio Calosi - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):281-292.
    This paper provides new arguments for the following claim: either strong composition as identity cannot retain the full strength of both the logical principles of one-one identity and its semantical principles or it only delivers cases of boring composition in that it entails mereological nihilism.
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  45.  10
    Boring Thoughts and Bored Minds: The MAC Model of Boredom and Cognitive Engagement.Erin C. Westgate & Timothy D. Wilson - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (5):689-713.
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  46. Imperial Boredom.Jeffrey Auerbach - 2005 - Common Knowledge 11 (2):283-305.
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  47.  60
    It is Logically Impossible for Everlasting God to Fall Into Boredom.Jerome Gellman - 2018 - Religious Studies 54 (2):285-288.
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  48.  25
    I Can’T Get No Satisfaction: Potential Causes of Boredom.Cory J. Gerritsen, Maggie E. Toplak, Jessica Sciaraffa & John Eastwood - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:27-41.
  49.  21
    Between Confusion and Boredom in the Study of Visual Argument.Robert Hariman - 2015 - Argumentation 29 (2):239-242.
    After reading the careful, thoughtful, carefully circumscribed scholarship that characterizes the study of argumentation, I can’t help but think that the study of visual argument might be, at least some of the time, a MacGuffin. That label comes from Alfred Hitchcock and now is enshrined in the lore of cinematic composition: the MacGuffin is a device whose presence motivates dramatic action yet proves to be “nothing” , whether trivial or unknowable or nonexistent. In like manner, the visual image has provided (...)
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  50.  7
    Eaten Up by Boredom: Consuming Food to Escape Awareness of the Bored Self.Andrew B. Moynihan, Wijnand A. P. Van Tilburg, Eric R. Igou, Arnaud Wisman, Alan E. Donnelly & Jessie B. Mulcaire - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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