Results for 'Brad S. Long'

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  1.  53
    Codes of Ethics and the Pursuit of Organizational Legitimacy: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions. [REVIEW]Brad S. Long & Cathy Driscoll - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):173 - 189.
    The focus of this paper is to further a discussion of codes of ethics as institutionalized organizational structures that extend some form of legitimacy to organizations. The particular form of legitimacy is of critical importance to our analysis. After reviewing various theories of legitimacy, we analyze the literature on how legitimacy is derived from codes of ethics to discover which specific form of legitimacy is gained from their presence in organizations. We content analyze a sample of codes to consider the (...)
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  2.  13
    Codes of Ethics and the Pursuit of Organizational Legitimacy: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions.Brad S. Long & Cathy Driscoll - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):173-189.
    The focus of this paper is to further a discussion of codes of ethics as institutionalized organizational structures that extend some form of legitimacy to organizations. The particular form of legitimacy is of critical importance to our analysis. After reviewing various theories of legitimacy, we analyze the literature on how legitimacy is derived from codes of ethics to discover which specific form of legitimacy is gained from their presence in organizations. We content analyze a sample of codes to consider the (...)
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  3.  46
    Dazed and Confused: Sports Medicine, Conflicts of Interest, and Concussion Management.Brad Partridge - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):65-74.
    Professional sports with high rates of concussion have become increasingly concerned about the long-term effects of multiple head injuries. In this context, return-to-play decisions about concussion generate considerable ethical tensions for sports physicians. Team doctors clearly have an obligation to the welfare of their patient (the injured athlete) but they also have an obligation to their employer (the team), whose primary interest is typically success through winning. At times, a team’s interest in winning may not accord with the welfare (...)
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  4.  12
    Repeated Head Injuries in Australia’s Collision Sports Highlight Ethical and Evidential Gaps in Concussion Management Policies.Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (1):39-45.
    Head injuries are an inherent risk of participating in the major collision sports played in Australia. Protocols introduced by the governing bodies of these sports are ostensibly designed to improve player safety but do not prevent players suffering from repeated concussions. There is evidence that repeated traumatic brain injuries increase the risk of developing a number of long term problems but scientific and popular debates have largely focused on whether there is a causal link between concussion and chronic traumatic (...)
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  5.  36
    The Ethics of Interrogation and the American Psychological Association: A Critique of Policy and Process.Brad Olson, Stephen Soldz & Martha Davis - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:3.
    The Psychological Ethics and National Security (PENS) task force was assembled by the American Psychological Association (APA) to guide policy on the role of psychologists in interrogations at foreign detention centers for the purpose of U.S. national security. The task force met briefly in 2005, and its report was quickly accepted by the APA Board of Directors and deemed consistent with the APA Ethics Code by the APA Ethics Committee. This rapid acceptance was unusual for a number of reasons but (...)
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  6.  40
    Parfit's Arguments for the Present-Aim Theory.Brad Hooker - 1992 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):61 – 75.
    This paper has been about the question of what there is most reason to doin situations in which either there are no moral considerations to be takeninto account or the moral considerations to be taken into account are equally balanced. I have assessed all Parfit's arguments for concluding that the Present-aim Theory is right and the Self-interest Theory wrong aboutthis question. In § III, I showed how Parfit's argument from personal identity leads not to the abandonment of the Self-interest Theory, (...)
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  7.  7
    The Unending Conversation: Kenneth Burke and Richard McKeon's Aesthetic Pragmatism, 1920–1960.Brad Baranowski - 2018 - Modern Intellectual History 15 (1):153-184.
    Historians of pragmatism have long overlooked Kenneth Burke and Richard McKeon. This has not been without good reason. At first glance, the two read more like critics than adherents of the tradition. Yet placing Burke and McKeon's writings from the 1920s to the late 1950s in the context of their development reveals a shared project aimed at reforming pragmatism. While pragmatists such as John Dewey and Sidney Hook alleged a conceptual fidelity between the scientific method and democratic processes such (...)
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  8. Seneca: Translated with Introduction and Commentary.Brad Inwood - 2007 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Seneca's Letters to Lucilius are a rich source of information about ancient Stoicism, an influential work for early modern philosophers, and a fascinating philosophical document in their own right. This selection of the letters aims to include those which are of greatest philosophical interest, especially those which highlight the debates between Stoics and Platonists or Aristotelians in the first century AD, and the issue, still important today, of how technical philosophical enquiry is related to the various purposes for which philosophy (...)
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  9.  65
    The Secret Doctrine and the Gigantomachia: Interpreting Plato’s Theaetetus-Sophist.Brad Berman - 2015 - Plato Journal 14:53-62.
    The Theaetetus’ ‘secret doctrine’ and the Sophist ’s ‘battle between gods and giants’ have long fascinated Plato scholars. I show that the passages systematically parallel one another. Each presents two substantive positions that are advanced on behalf of two separate parties, related to one another by their comparative sophistication or refinement. Further, those parties and their respective positions are characterized in substantially similar terms. On the basis of these sustained parallels, I argue that the two passages should be read (...)
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  10.  13
    Metascience and Neurath’s Boat.K. Brad Wray & Luciano Boschiero - 2015 - Metascience 24 (2):171-172.
    Otto Neurath compared science to a ship at sea on which the sailors have to repair their vessel as they keep it afloat. Metascience is a ship of a similar sort. Do not worry. There are no repairs to report. But changes are being made at Metascience on an ongoing basis, even as we work to meet our production deadlines. With this, our second issue, we would like to announce some further changes with the journal.Ties Nijseen and Christi Lue who (...)
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  11.  98
    Evolution Without Species: The Case of Mosaic Bacteriophages.Gregory J. Morgan & W. Brad Pitts - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):745-765.
    College of Medicine, University of South Alabama Mobile, AL 36688-0002, USA wbp501{at}jaguar1.usouthal.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Recent work in viral genomics has shown that bacteriophages exhibit a high degree of mosaicism, which is most likely due to a long history of prolific horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Given these findings, we argue that each of the most plausible attempts to properly classify bacteriophages into distinct species fail. Mayr's biological species concept fails because there (...)
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  12.  12
    Evolution Without Species: The Case of Mosaic Bacteriophages: Articles.Gregory J. Morgan & W. Brad Pitts - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):745-765.
    Recent work in viral genomics has shown that bacteriophages exhibit a high degree of mosaicism, which is most likely due to a long history of prolific horizontal gene transfer. Given these findings, we argue that each of the most plausible attempts to properly classify bacteriophages into distinct species fail. Mayr's biological species concept fails because there is no useful viral analog to sexual reproduction. Phenetic species concepts fail because they obscure the mosaicism and the rich reticulated viral histories. Phylogenetic (...)
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  13.  34
    Kuhn, the History of Chemistry, and the Philosophy of Science.K. Brad Wray - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (1):75-92.
    I draw attention to one of the most important sources of Kuhn’s ideas in Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Contrary to the popular trend of focusing on external factors in explaining Kuhn’s views, factors related to his social milieu or personal experiences, I focus on the influence of the books and articles he was reading and thinking about in the history of science, specifically, sources in the history of chemistry. I argue that there is good reason to think that the history (...)
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  14.  75
    No Room for God? History, Science, Metaphysics, and the Study of Religion.Brad S. Gregory - 2008 - History and Theory 47 (4):495 - 519.
    Intellectual history, philosophy, and science’s own self-understanding undermine the claim that science entails or need even tend toward atheism. By definition a radically transcendent creator-God is inaccessible to empirical investigation. Denials of the possibility or actual occurrence of miracles depend not on science itself, but on naturalist assumptions that derive originally from a univocal metaphysics with its historical roots in medieval nominalism, which in turn have deeply influenced philosophy and science since the seventeenth century. The metaphysical postulate of naturalism and (...)
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  15.  14
    The Other Confessional History: On Secular Bias in the Study of Religion.Brad S. Gregory - 2006 - History and Theory 45 (4):132-149.
    The rejection of confessional commitments in the study of religion in favor of social-scientific or humanistic theories of religion has produced not unbiased accounts, but reductionist explanations of religious belief and practice with embedded secular biases that preclude the understanding of religious believer-practitioners. These biases derive from assumptions of undemonstrable, dogmatic, metaphysical naturalism or its functional equivalent, an epistemological skepticism about all truth claims of revealed religions. Because such assumptions are so widespread among scholars today, they are not often explicitly (...)
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  16.  31
    The Other Confessional History: On Secular Bias in the Study of Religion.Brad S. Gregory - 2006 - History and Theory 45 (4):132–149.
    The rejection of confessional commitments in the study of religion in favor of social-scientific or humanistic theories of religion has produced not unbiased accounts, but reductionist explanations of religious belief and practice with embedded secular biases that preclude the understanding of religious believer-practitioners. These biases derive from assumptions of undemonstrable, dogmatic, metaphysical naturalism or its functional equivalent, an epistemological skepticism about all truth claims of revealed religions. Because such assumptions are so widespread among scholars today, they are not often explicitly (...)
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  17.  14
    2. "A Harvest of Holiness": The Theology of Danielle Rose's Mysteries.Brad S. Gregory - 2005 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 8 (4).
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  18. „Spre normalitate, prin descentralizare”.S. D. Brad - 2011 - Dilema Veche 365.
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  19. The Catholic and Radical Enlightenments of the Eighteenth Century.Brad S. Gregory - 2011 - The Thomist 75 (3):461-475.
     
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  20.  4
    Neutralising Fair Credit: Factors That Influence Unethical Authorship Practices.Brad S. Trinkle, Trisha Phillips, Alicia Hall & Barton Moffatt - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):368-373.
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  21. Limitation and Idealism: Kant's 'Long' Argument From the Categories.Dennis Schulting - 2010 - In Dennis Schulting Jacco Verburgt (ed.), Kant's Idealism. Springer.
  22.  23
    Darwin's Long and Short Arguments.Matti Sintonen - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (4):677-689.
    Doren Recker has criticized the prevailing accounts of Darwin's argument for the theory of natural selection in the Origin of Species. In this note I argue that Recker fails to distinguish between a deductive short argument for the principle of natural selection, and a non-deductive, long argument which aims at establishing that the principle has explanatory power in the various domains of application. I shall try to show that the semantic view of theories, especially in its structuralist form, makes (...)
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  23.  85
    Reading Seneca: Stoic Philosophy at Rome.Brad Inwood - 2005 - Clarendon Press.
    Brad Inwood presents a selection of his most influential essays on the philosophy of Seneca, the Roman Stoic thinker, statesman, and tragedian of the first century AD. Including two brand-new pieces, and a helpful introduction to orient the reader, this volume will be an essential guide for anyone seeking to understand Seneca's fertile, wide-ranging thought and its impact on subsequent generations.
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  24. Kuhn's Evolutionary Social Epistemology.K. Brad Wray - 2011 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions has been enduringly influential in philosophy of science, challenging many common presuppositions about the nature of science and the growth of scientific knowledge. However, philosophers have misunderstood Kuhn's view, treating him as a relativist or social constructionist. In this book, Brad Wray argues that Kuhn provides a useful framework for developing an epistemology of science that takes account of the constructive role that social factors play in scientific inquiry. He examines the core concepts of (...)
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  25. Standing in Livestock's 'Long Shadow': The Ethics of Eating Meat on a Small Planet. Henning - 2011 - Ethics and the Environment 16 (2):63-93.
    A primary contribution of this essay is to provide a survey of the human and environmental impacts of livestock production. We will find that the mass consumption of animals is a primary reason why humans are hungry, fat, or sick and is a leading cause behind the depletion and pollution of waterways, the degradation and deforestation of the land, the extinction of species, and the warming of the planet. Recognizing these harms, this essay will consider various solutions being proposed to (...)
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  26. Mill's Higher Pleasures and the Choice of Character*: Roderick T. Long.Roderick T. Long - 1992 - Utilitas 4 (2):279-297.
    J. S. Mill's distinction between higher and lower pleasures is often thought to conflict with his commitment to psychological and ethical hedonism: if the superiority of higher pleasures is quantitative, then the higher/lower distinction is superfluous and Mill contradicts himself; if the superiority of higher pleasures is not quantitative, then Mill's hedonism is compromised.
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  27. Rule-Consequentialism.Brad Hooker - 1990 - Mind 99 (393):67-77.
    The theory of morality we can call full rule - consequentialism selects rules solely in terms of the goodness of their consequences and then claims that these rules determine which kinds of acts are morally wrong. George Berkeley was arguably the first rule -consequentialist. He wrote, “In framing the general laws of nature, it is granted we must be entirely guided by the public good of mankind, but not in the ordinary moral actions of our lives. … The rule is (...)
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  28.  28
    Kolakowski's Long Goodbye.David Joravsky - 1981 - Theory and Society 10 (2):293-305.
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  29.  26
    The Structure and Strategy of Darwin's ‘Long Argument’.M. J. S. Hodge - 1977 - British Journal for the History of Science 10 (3):237-246.
  30. Seneca: Selected Philosophical Letters: Translated with Introduction and Commentary.Brad Inwood - 2007 - Clarendon Press.
    Seneca's Letters to Lucilius are a rich source of information about ancient Stoicism, an influential work for early modern philosophers, and a fascinating philosophical document in their own right. This selection of the letters aims to include those which are of greatest philosophical interest. In addition to examining the philosophical content of each letter, Brad Inwood's commentary discusses their literary and historical background.
     
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  31.  23
    The Theological Application of Bhaskar's Stratified Reality: The Scientific Theology of A.E. McGrath.Brad Shipway - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):191-203.
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  32. Causal Decision Theory and Decision Instability.Brad Armendt - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy 116 (5):263-277.
    The problem of the man who met death in Damascus appeared in the infancy of the theory of rational choice known as causal decision theory. A straightforward, unadorned version of causal decision theory is presented here and applied, along with Brian Skyrms’ deliberation dynamics, to Death in Damascus and similar problems. Decision instability is a fascinating topic, but not a source of difficulty for causal decision theory. Andy Egan’s purported counterexample to causal decision theory, Murder Lesion, is considered; a simple (...)
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  33. Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism.Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. The (...)
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  34. The Spatial Content of Experience.Brad Thompson - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):146-184.
    To what extent is the external world the way that it appears to us in perceptual experience? This perennial question in philosophy is no doubt ambiguous in many ways. For example, it might be taken as equivalent to the question of whether or not the external world is the way that it appears to be? This is a question about the epistemology of perception: Are our perceptual experiences by and large veridical representations of the external world? Alternatively, the question might (...)
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  35. Morality, Rules, and Consequences: A Critical Reader.Brad Hooker, Elinor Mason, Dale E. Miller, D. W. Haslett, Shelly Kagan, Sanford S. Levy, David Lyons, Phillip Montague, Tim Mulgan, Philip Pettit, Madison Powers, Jonathan Riley, William H. Shaw, Michael Smith & Alan Thomas (eds.) - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    What determines whether an action is right or wrong? Morality, Rules, and Consequences: A Critical Reader explores for students and researchers the relationship between consequentialist theory and moral rules. Most of the chapters focus on rule consequentialism or on the distinction between act and rule versions of consequentialism. Contributors, among them the leading philosophers in the discipline, suggest ways of assessing whether rule consequentialism could be a satisfactory moral theory. These essays, all of which are previously unpublished, provide students in (...)
     
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  36.  11
    Reinterpreting §56 of Frege's The Foundations of Arithmetic.K. Brad Wray - 1995 - Auslegung 20 (2):76-82.
    I defend an alternative reading of §56 of Frege's Grundlagen, one that rescues Frege from Dummett's charge that this section is the weakest in the whole book. On my reading, Frege is not presenting arguments against the adjectival strategy. Rather, Frege presents the definitions in §55 in order to convince his reader that numbers must be objects. In §56 Frege suggests that these definitions contain two shortcomings that adequate definitions of numbers must overcome. And these short-comings, he argues, can only (...)
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  37.  8
    When Does Family Ownership Promote Proactive Environmental Strategy? The Role of the Firm’s Long-Term Orientation.Song Wang, Emma Su & Junsheng Dou - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (1):81-95.
    This research proposes an explanation for the conflicting extant evidence about whether family ownership of a business promotes proactive environmental strategy. Based on insights drawn from strategic reference point theory, organizational identity theory, and the socioemotional wealth preservation perspective, we propose that family ownership has a moderated–mediated relationship with PES, with commitment as a moderator and long-term orientation as a mediator. A test using 454 China private firms with different levels of family ownership supports the hypotheses. This shows that (...)
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  38.  5
    The Theological Application of Bhaskar's Stratified Reality: The Scientific Theology of A.E. McGrath.Brad Shipway - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (1):191-203.
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  39.  24
    Notes on Philosophy, Probability and Mathematics. [REVIEW]Brad Armendt - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):713-715.
    Review of Maria Carla Galavotti (ed), Notes on Philosophy, Probability and Mathematics, 1991, Bibliopolis. Notes are selected from manuscripts by Frank Plumpton Ramsey at the University of Pittsburgh's Hillman Library.
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  40. Does Moral Virtue Constitute a Benefit to the Agent?Brad Hooker - 1996 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should one Live? Oxford University Press.
    Theories of individual well‐being fall into three main categories: hedonism, the desire‐fulfilment theory, and the list theory (which maintains that there are some things that can benefit a person without increasing the person's pleasure or desire‐fulfilment). The paper briefly explains the answers that hedonism and the desire‐fulfilment theory give to the question of whether being virtuous constitutes a benefit to the agent. Most of the paper is about the list theory's answer.
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  41. A Selectionist Explanation for the Success and Failures of Science.K. Brad Wray - 2007 - Erkenntnis 67 (1):81-89.
    I argue that van Fraassen's selectionist explanation for the success of science is superior to the realists' explanation. Whereas realists argue that our current theories are successful because they accurately reflect the structure of the world, the selectionist claims that our current theories are successful because unsuccessful theories have been eliminated. I argue that, unlike the explanation proposed by the realist, the selectionist explanation can also account for the failures of once successful theories and the fact that sometimes two competing (...)
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  42. Fairness.Brad Hooker - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):329 - 352.
    The main body of this paper assesses a leading recent theory of fairness, a theory put forward by John Broome. I discuss Broome's theory partly because of its prominence and partly because I think it points us in the right direction, even if it takes some missteps. In the course of discussing Broome's theory, I aim to cast light on the relation of fairness to consistency, equality, impartiality, desert, rights, and agreements. Indeed, before I start assessing Broome's theory, I discuss (...)
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  43.  9
    Using Versus Excusing: The Hudson’s Bay Company’s Long-Term Engagement with Its (Problematic) Past.Wim Van Lent & Andrew D. Smith - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):215-231.
    Increased scrutiny of corporate legitimacy has sparked an interest in “historic corporate social responsibility”, or the mechanism through which firms take responsibility for past misdeeds. Extant theory on historic CSR implicitly treats corporate engagement with historical criticism as intentional and dichotomous, with firms choosing either a limited or a high engagement strategy. However, this conceptualization is puzzling because a firm’s engagement with historic claims involves organizational practices that managers don’t necessarily control; hence, it might materialize differently than anticipated. Furthermore, multiple (...)
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  44.  7
    The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society. By Brad S. Gregory. Pp. 592, Cambridge, MA/London, England, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2012, $39.95. [REVIEW]Peter Admirand - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 59 (2):301-302.
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  45. Tractatus theologico-politicus. Gebhardt edition.Baruch Spinoza, Samuel Shirley & Brad S. Gregory - 1996 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 58 (1):167-169.
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  46.  1
    The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society by Brad S. Gregory. [REVIEW]Haruko Nawata Ward - 2015 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 69 (1):97-100.
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  47. Stoicism: A Very Short Introduction.Brad Inwood - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Stoicism is two things: a long past philosophical school of ancient Greece and Rome, and an enduring philosophical movement that still inspires people in the twenty-first century to re-think and re-organize their lives in order to achieve personal satisfaction. Brad Inwood presents the long history that connects these.
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  48. Dutch Books, Additivity, and Utility Theory.Brad Armendt - 1993 - Philosophical Topics 21 (1):1-20.
    One guide to an argument's significance is the number and variety of refutations it attracts. By this measure, the Dutch book argument has considerable importance.2 Of course this measure alone is not a sure guide to locating arguments deserving of our attention—if a decisive refutation has really been given, we are better off pursuing other topics. But the presence of many and varied counterarguments at least suggests that either the refutations are controversial, or that their target admits of more than (...)
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  49. The Demandingness Objection.Brad Hooker - 2009 - In T. Chappell (ed.), The Problem of Moral Demandingness. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 148-162.
    This paper’s first section invokes a relevant meta-ethical principle about what a moral theory needs in order to be plausible and superior to its rivals. In subsequent sections, I try to pinpoint exactly what the demandingness objection has been taken to be. I try to explain how the demandingness objection developed in reaction to impartial act-consequentialism’s requirement of beneficence toward strangers. In zeroing in on the demandingness objection, I distinguish it from other, more or less closely related, objections. In particular, (...)
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  50. Scanlon's Contractualism, the Spare Wheel Objection, and Aggregation'.Brad Hooker - 2003 - In Matt Matravers (ed.), Scanlon and Contractualism. Frank Cass.
     
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