4 found
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  1.  7
    Apophatic Theology, Apostles, and Alethic Realism.Bradley N. Seeman - 2017 - Philosophia Christi 19 (1):145-156.
    In “Idolatry and the End of Apologetics,” I worried that while continental philosophy can aid Christian philosophers and theologians, it can also tempt us toward the “Idolatry of Linguistic License”—an idolatry which sets God so far beyond our words that we deny God’s normative place in the community of speakers while safeguarding our autonomy vis-à-vis God. My essay suggested that some passages in Myron Bradley Penner’s helpful book, The End of Apologetics, might pass too close to the Idolatry of Linguistic (...)
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  2.  3
    Idolatry and the End of Apologetics.Bradley N. Seeman - 2015 - Philosophia Christi 17 (1):105-126.
    Myron Penner’s work shows some ways continental philosophy could strengthen apologetics. In particular, continental philosophy can serve what Francis Schaeffer called “the final apologetic” by exposing idols that keep us from living lives of “costly, observable love.” Yet continental philosophy can also imperil apologetics and theology. The worst danger stems from what I call the “idolatry of linguistic license,” a type of idolatry where linguistic criticism denies God a place in the normative community of speakers. Although the idolatry of linguistic (...)
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  3.  32
    The “Paradox of Self‐Constitution” and Korsgaard's Two Conceptions of Maxims for Action.Bradley N. Seeman - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (2):233-250.
    This article argues that Christine Korsgaard gives two accounts of maxims, the identity-priority account and the form-priority account. There is a tension between the accounts because Korsgaard's form-priority maxims account cannot function apart from the identity of a well-formed agent that precedes and tests maxims to determine if they should count as reasons or laws, and Korsgaard's identity-priority maxims account needs the form of the maxim to precede, bind, and constitute the well-formed agent. This tension mirrors the two sides of (...)
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  4.  24
    Whose Rationality? Which Cognitive Psychotherapy?: Metaphysical Facts and a Second Look at Richard Brandt’s Second Puzzle for Utilitarianism.Bradley N. Seeman - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):201-222.
    Richard Brandt’s “Second Puzzle” for utilitarianism asks: What is meant to count as benefit or utility? In addressing this puzzle, Brandt dismisses “objective” theories of utility as prejudging substantive moral issues and opts for “subjective” theories of utility based either on desire-satisfaction or happiness, so as to welcome people with a variety of substantive moral commitments into his utilitarian system. However, subjective theories have difficulties finding principled grounds for elevating one desire over another. Brandt attempts to circumvent the difficulties through (...)
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