Results for 'Brain Emulation'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  54
    Fundamentals of Whole Brain Emulation: State, Transition and Update Representations.Randal A. Koene - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):5-21.
  2.  99
    Experimental Research in Whole Brain Emulation: The Need for Innovativein Vivomeasurement Techniques.Randal A. Koene - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):35-65.
  3.  64
    Available Tools for Whole Brain Emulation.Diana Deca - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):67-86.
  4. Coalescing Minds: Brain Uploading-Related Group Mind Scenarios.Kaj Sotala & Harri Valpola - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):293-312.
    We present a hypothetical process of mind coalescence, where arti cial connections are created between two or more brains. This might simply allow for an improved form of communication. At the other extreme, it might merge the minds into one in a process that can be thought of as a reverse split-brain operation. We propose that one way mind coalescence might happen is via an exocortex, a prosthetic extension of the biological brain which integrates with the brain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception.Rick Grush - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   194 citations  
  6. In Defense of Some "Cartesian" Assumption Concerning the Brain and its Operation.Rick Grush - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):53-92.
    I argue against a growing radical trend in current theoretical cognitive science that moves from the premises of embedded cognition, embodied cognition, dynamical systems theory and/or situated robotics to conclusions either to the effect that the mind is not in the brain or that cognition does not require representation, or both. I unearth the considerations at the foundation of this view: Haugeland's bandwidth-component argument to the effect that the brain is not a component in cognitive activity, and arguments (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  7. Risks of Artificial General Intelligence.Vincent C. Müller (ed.) - 2014 - Taylor & Francis (JETAI).
    Special Issue “Risks of artificial general intelligence”, Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence, 26/3 (2014), ed. Vincent C. Müller. http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/teta20/26/3# - Risks of general artificial intelligence, Vincent C. Müller, pages 297-301 - Autonomous technology and the greater human good - Steve Omohundro - pages 303-315 - - - The errors, insights and lessons of famous AI predictions – and what they mean for the future - Stuart Armstrong, Kaj Sotala & Seán S. Ó hÉigeartaigh - pages 317-342 - - (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Advantages of Artificial Intelligences, Uploads, and Digital Minds.Kaj Sotala - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):275-291.
    I survey four categories of factors that might give a digital mind, such as an upload or an artificial general intelligence, an advantage over humans. Hardware advantages include greater serial speeds and greater parallel speeds. Self-improvement advantages include improvement of algorithms, design of new mental modules, and modification of motivational system. Co-operative advantages include copyability, perfect co-operation, improved communication, and transfer of skills. Human handicaps include computational limitations and faulty heuristics, human-centric biases, and socially motivated cognition. The shape of hardware (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9. Editorial: Risks of General Artificial Intelligence.Vincent C. Müller - 2014 - Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 26 (3):297-301.
    This is the editorial for a special volume of JETAI, featuring papers by Omohundro, Armstrong/Sotala/O’Heigeartaigh, T Goertzel, Brundage, Yampolskiy, B. Goertzel, Potapov/Rodinov, Kornai and Sandberg. - If the general intelligence of artificial systems were to surpass that of humans significantly, this would constitute a significant risk for humanity – so even if we estimate the probability of this event to be fairly low, it is necessary to think about it now. We need to estimate what progress we can expect, what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  15
    Large-Scale Brain Simulation and Disorders of Consciousness. Mapping Technical and Conceptual Issues.Michele Farisco, Jeanette H. Kotaleski & Kathinka Evers - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Modelling and simulations have gained a leading position in contemporary attempts to describe, explain, and quantitatively predict the human brain's operations. Computer models are highly sophisticated tools developed to achieve an integrated knowledge of the brain with the aim of overcoming the actual fragmentation resulting from different neuroscientific approaches. In this paper we investigate plausibility of simulation technologies for emulation of consciousness and the potential clinical impact of large-scale brain simulation on the assessment and care of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  57
    Further Explorations of the Empirical and Theoretical Aspects of the Emulation Theory.Rick Grush - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):425-435.
    The emulation theory of representation articulated in the target article is further explained and explored in this response to commentaries. Major topics include: the irrelevance of equilibrium-point and related models of motor control to the theory; clarification of the particular sense of “representation” which the emulation theory of representation is an account of; the relation between the emulation framework and Kalman filtering; and addressing the empirical data considered to be in conflict with the emulation theory. In (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  71
    Emulation Learning and Cultural Learning.Michael Tomasello - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):703-704.
    Byrne & Russon redefine the process of emulation learning as “goal emulation” and thereby distort its most distinctive characteristic: the criterion that the observer focuses on environmental rather than behavioral processes. The two empirical examples recounted – gorilla plant processing and orangutan manipulation of human artifacts – are hierarchically organized behaviors, but there is very little evidence that they involve imitative learning, program-level or otherwise.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  32
    Imitation, Emulation, and the Transmission of Culture.Andrew Whiten - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):39-40.
    Three related issues are addressed. First, Hurley treats emulation and imitation as a straightforward dichotomy with emulation emerging first. Recent conceptual analyses and chimpanzee experiments challenge this. Second, other recent chimpanzee experiments reveal high-fidelity social transmission, questioning whether copying fidelity is the brake on cumulative culture. Finally, other cognitive processes such as pretence need to be integrated.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  76
    Brains Have Emulators with Brains: Emulation Economized.Ricarda I. Schubotz & D. Yves von Cramon - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):414-415.
    This commentary addresses the neural implementation of emulation, mostly using findings from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Furthermore, both empirical and theoretical suggestions are discussed that render two aspects of emulation theory redundant: independent modal emulators and extra measurement of amodal emulation. This modified emulation theory can conceptually integrate simulation theory and also get rid of some problematic philosophical implications.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  37
    Motoric Emulation May Contribute to Perceiving Imitable Stimuli.Margaret Wilson - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):424-424.
    First, I note three questions that need further exploration: how fast the emulator operates, compared to the real-time events it models; what exactly perceptual emulation, with no motor component, consists of; and whether images are equivalent to raw sensations. Next, I propose that Grush's framework can explain the role of motor activation in processing “imitable” stimuli.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  23
    Emulation Theory Offers Conceptual Gains but Needs Filters.Catherine L. Reed, Jefferson D. Grubb & Piotr Winkielman - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):411-412.
    Much can be gained by specifying the operation of the emulation process. A brief review of studies from diverse domains, including complex motor-skill representation, emotion perception, and face memory, highlights that emulation theory offers precise explanations of results and novel predictions. However, the neural instantiation of the emulation process requires development to move the theory from armchair to laboratory.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  19
    If Emulation is Representation, Does Detail Matter?Lynn Andrea Stein - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):417-417.
    Grush describes a variety of different systems that illustrate his vision of representation through emulation. These individual data points are not necessarily sufficient to determine what level of detail is required for a representation to count as emulation. By examining one of his examples closely, this commentary suggest that salience of the information supplied is a critical dimension.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  25
    The Size-Weight Illusion, Emulation, and the Cerebellum.Edward M. Hubbard & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):407-408.
    In this commentary we discuss a predictive sensorimotor illusion, the size-weight illusion, in which the smaller of two objects of equal weight is perceived as heavier. We suggest that Grush's emulation theory can explain this illusion as a mismatch between predicted and actual sensorimotor feedback, and present preliminary data suggesting that the cerebellum may be critical for implementing the emulator.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  12
    Sensation and Emulation of Coordinated Actions.Charles B. Walter - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):419-420.
    Although the application of the emulation model to the control of simple positioning movements is relatively straightforward, extending the scheme to actions requiring multisegmental, interlimb coordination complicates matters a bit. Special consideration of the demands in this case, both on sensory processing and on the process model (two key elements of the Kalman filter), are discussed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  14
    Small Brains and Minimalist Emulation: When is an Internal Model No Longer a Model?Barbara Webb - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):421-422.
    Many of Grush's arguments should apply equally to animals with small brains, for which the capacity to internally model the body and environment must be limited. The dilemma may be solved by making only very approximate predictions, or only attempting to derive a “high-level” prediction from “high-level” output. At the extreme, in either case, the “emulation” step becomes trivial.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies.Nick Bostrom (ed.) - 2014
    The human brain has some capabilities that the brains of other animals lack. It is to these distinctive capabilities that our species owes its dominant position. Other animals have stronger muscles or sharper claws, but we have cleverer brains. If machine brains one day come to surpass human brains in general intelligence, then this new superintelligence could become very powerful. As the fate of the gorillas now depends more on us humans than on the gorillas themselves, so the fate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  22. Emulation and Cognition.Rick Grush - 1995 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    I explain a strategy, called model-based control, which has proven useful in control theory, and argue that many aspects of brain function can be understood as applications of this strategy. I first demonstrate that in the domain of motor control, there is good evidence that the brain constructs models, or emulators, of musculoskeletal dynamics. I then argue that imagery, motor, visual and otherwise, can be supported by these emulatory mechanisms. I argue that the same apparatus to understanding aspects (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  23.  18
    Emulation of Kinesthesia During Motor Imagery.Norihiro Sadato & Eiichi Naito - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):412-413.
    Illusory kinesthetic sensation was influenced by motor imagery of the wrist following tendon vibration. The imagery and the illusion conditions commonly activated the contralateral cingulate motor area, supplementary motor area, dorsal premotor cortex, and ipsilateral cerebellum. This supports the notion that motor imagery is a mental rehearsal of movement, during which expected kinesthetic sensation is emulated by recruiting multiple motor areas, commonly activated by pure kinesthesia.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  28
    Representation: Emulation and Anticipation.Georgi Stojanov & Mark H. Bickhard - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):418-418.
    We address the issue of the normativity of representation and how Grush might address it for emulations as constituting representations. We then proceed to several more detailed issues concerning the learning of emulations, a possible empirical counterexample to Grush's model, and the choice of Kalman filters as the form of model-based control.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Explaining the Brain: Mechanisms and the Mosaic Unity of Neuroscience.Carl F. Craver - 2007 - Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press.
    Carl Craver investigates what we are doing when we sue neuroscience to explain what's going on in the brain.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   371 citations  
  26. Neural Reuse: A Fundamental Organizational Principle of the Brain.Michael L. Anderson - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):245.
    An emerging class of theories concerning the functional structure of the brain takes the reuse of neural circuitry for various cognitive purposes to be a central organizational principle. According to these theories, it is quite common for neural circuits established for one purpose to be exapted (exploited, recycled, redeployed) during evolution or normal development, and be put to different uses, often without losing their original functions. Neural reuse theories thus differ from the usual understanding of the role of neural (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   140 citations  
  27. Transfer of Personality to Synthetic Human ("Mind Uploading") and the Social Construction of Identity.John Danaher & Sim Bamford - 2017 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 24 (11-12):6-30.
    Humans have long wondered whether they can survive the death of their physical bodies. Some people now look to technology as a means by which this might occur, using terms such 'whole brain emulation', 'mind uploading', and 'substrate independent minds' to describe a set of hypothetical procedures for transferring or emulating the functioning of a human mind on a synthetic substrate. There has been much debate about the philosophical implications of such procedures for personal survival. Most participants to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  14
    From Semantic Analogy to Theoretical Confusion?Valérie Gaveau, Michel Desmurget & Pierre Baraduc - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):404-404.
    We briefly address three issues that might be important to evaluate the validity of the “emulation theory”: (1) Does it really say something new? (2) Are similar processes engaged in action, imagery, and perception? (3) Does a brain amodal emulator exist?
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence.Vincent Müller (ed.) - 2016 - Springer.
    [Müller, Vincent C. (ed.), (2016), Fundamental issues of artificial intelligence (Synthese Library, 377; Berlin: Springer). 570 pp.] -- This volume offers a look at the fundamental issues of present and future AI, especially from cognitive science, computer science, neuroscience and philosophy. This work examines the conditions for artificial intelligence, how these relate to the conditions for intelligence in humans and other natural agents, as well as ethical and societal problems that artificial intelligence raises or will raise. The key issues this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Neurophilosophy: Toward A Unified Science of the Mind-Brain.Patricia S. Churchland - 1986 - MIT Press.
    This is a unique book. It is excellently written, crammed with information, wise and a pleasure to read.' ---Daniel C. Dennett, Tufts University.
  31. Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain.Antonio R. Damasio - 1994 - Putnam.
  32. The Case for Mental Duality: Evidence From Split-Brain Data and Other Considerations.Roland Puccetti - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):93-123.
    Contrary to received opinion among philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists, conscious duality as a principle of brain organization is neither incoherent nor demonstrably false. The present paper begins by reviewing the history of the theory and its anatomical basis and defending it against the claim that it rests upon an arbitrary decision as to what constitutes the biological substratum of mind or person.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  33. Decomposing the Brain: A Long Term Pursuit. [REVIEW]William P. Bechtel - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):229-242.
    This paper defends cognitive neuroscience’s project of developing mechanistic explan- ations of cognitive processes through decomposition and localization against objections raised by William Uttal in The New Phrenology. The key issue between Uttal and researchers pursuing cognitive neuroscience is that Uttal bets against the possibility of decomposing mental operations into component elementary operations which are localized in distinct brain regions. The paper argues that it is through advancing and revising what are likely to be overly simplistic and incorrect decompositions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  34. Survival with an Asymmetrical Brain: Advantages and Disadvantages of Cerebral Lateralization.Giorgio Vallortigara & Lesley J. Rogers - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):575-589.
    Recent evidence in natural and semi-natural settings has revealed a variety of left-right perceptual asymmetries among vertebrates. These include preferential use of the left or right visual hemifield during activities such as searching for food, agonistic responses, or escape from predators in animals as different as fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. There are obvious disadvantages in showing such directional asymmetries because relevant stimuli may be located to the animal's left or right at random; there is no a priori association (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  35. Developmental Structure in Brain Evolution.Barbara L. Finlay, Richard B. Darlington & Nicholas Nicastro - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):263-278.
    How does evolution grow bigger brains? It has been widely assumed that growth of individual structures and functional systems in response to niche-specific cognitive challenges is the most plausible mechanism for brain expansion in mammals. Comparison of multiple regressions on allometric data for 131 mammalian species, however, suggests that for 9 of 11 brain structures taxonomic and body size factors are less important than covariance of these major structures with each other. Which structure grows biggest is largely predicted (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  36.  48
    Précis of the Brain and Emotion.Edmund T. Rolls - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):177-191.
    The topics treated in The brain and emotion include the definition, nature, and functions of emotion (Ch. 3); the neural bases of emotion (Ch. 4); reward, punishment, and emotion in brain design (Ch. 10); a theory of consciousness and its application to understanding emotion and pleasure (Ch. 9); and neural networks and emotion-related learning (Appendix). The approach is that emotions can be considered as states elicited by reinforcers (rewards and punishers). This approach helps with understanding the functions of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  37. Operational Architectonics of the Human Brain Biopotential Field: Toward Solving the Mind-Brain Problem.Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (3):261-296.
    The understanding of the interrelationship between brain and mind remains far from clear. It is well established that the brain's capacity to integrate information from numerous sources forms the basis for cognitive abilities. However, the core unresolved question is how information about the "objective" physical entities of the external world can be integrated, and how unifiedand coherent mental states (or Gestalts) can be established in the internal entities of distributed neuronal systems. The present paper offers a unified methodological (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  38. The Self and Its Brain: An Argument for Interactionism.Karl R. Popper & John C. Eccles - 1977 - Springer.
    Physical and chemical processes may act upon the mind; and when we are writing a difficult letter, our mind acts upon our body and, through a chain of physical...
  39. The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why?Frederique de Vignemont & Tania Singer - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.
    Recent imaging results suggest that individuals automatically share the emotions of others when exposed to their emotions. We question the assumption of the automaticity and propose a contextual approach, suggesting several modulatory factors that might influence empathic brain responses. Contextual appraisal could occur early in emotional cue evaluation, which then might or might not lead to an empathic brain response, or not until after an empathic brain response is automatically elicited. We propose two major roles for empathy; (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   111 citations  
  40.  66
    An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain.Jonathan Kenneth Burns - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41.  23
    Privacy and Ethics in Brain-Computer Interface Research.Eran Klein & Alan Rubel - 2018 - In Chang S. Nam, Anton Nijholt & Fabien Lotte (eds.), Brain–Computer Interfaces Handbook: Technological and Theoretical Advances. Boca Raton, FL, USA: pp. 653-655.
    Neural engineers and clinicians are starting to translate advances in electrodes, neural computation, and signal processing into clinically useful devices to allow control of wheelchairs, spellers, prostheses, and other devices. In the process, large amounts of brain data are being generated from participants, including intracortical, subdural and extracranial sources. Brain data is a vital resource for BCI research but there are concerns about whether the collection and use of this data generates risk to privacy. Further, the nature of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  25
    Some Practical and Theoretical Issues Concerning Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts as Therapy for Brain Dysfunctions.Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):36-45.
    Grafts of embryonic neural tissue into the brains of adult patients are currently being used to treat Parkinson's disease and are under serious consideration as therapy for a variety of other degenerative and traumatic disorders. This target article evaluates the use of transplants to promote recovery from brain injury and highlights the kinds of questions and problems that must be addressed before this form of therapy is routinely applied. It has been argued that neural transplantation can promote functional recovery (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  90
    Why the Brain Knows More Than We Do.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2011 - Brain Sciences 2:1-21.
    Scientific studies have shown that non-conscious stimuli and représentations influence information processing during conscious experience. In the light of such evidence, questions about potential functional links between non-conscious brain representations and conscious experience arise. This article discusses models capable of explaining how statistical learning mechanisms in dedicated resonant circuits could generate specific temporal activity traces of non-conscious representations in the brain. How reentrant signaling, top-down matching, and statistical coincidence of such activity traces may lead to the progressive consolidation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Current Debate on the Ethical Issues of Brain Death.Masahiro Morioka - 2004 - Proceedings of International Congress on Ethical Issues in Brain Death and Organ Transplantation:57-59.
    The philosophy of our proposal are as follows: (1) Various ideas of life and death, including that of objecting to brain death as human death, should be guaranteed. We would like to maintain the idea of pluralism of human death; and (2) We should respect a child’s view of life and death. We should provide him/her with an opportunity to think and express their own ideas about life and death.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  91
    The Two Factor Theory of the Mind-Brain Relation.Ullin T. Place - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):29-43.
    The analysis of mental concepts suggests that the distinctionbetween the mental and the nonmental is not ontologically fundamental,and that, whereas mental processes are one and the same things as thebrain processes with which they are correlated, dispositional mentalstates depend causally on and are, thus, ''''distinct existences'''' fromthe states of the brain microstructure with which ''they'' are correlated.It is argued that this difference in the relation between an entity andits composition/underlying structure applies across the board. allstuffs and processes are the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  50
    Binocular Rivalry Between Complex Stimuli in Split-Brain Observers.Robert P. O'Shea & Paul M. Corballis - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (1):151-160.
    We investigated binocular rivalry in the twocerebral hemispheres of callosotomized(split-brain) observers. We found that rivalryoccurs for complex stimuli in split-brainobservers, and that it is similar in the twohemispheres. This poses difficulties for twotheories of rivalry: (1) that rivalry occursbecause of switching of activity between thetwo hemispheres, and (2) that rivalry iscontrolled by a structure in the rightfrontoparietal cortex. Instead, similar rivalryfrom the two hemispheres is consistent with atheory that its mechanism is low in the visualsystem, at which each hemisphere (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  45
    The Moral Brain.David Loye - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):133-150.
    This article probes the evolutionary origins ofmoral capacities and moral agency. From thisit develops a theory of the guidancesystem of higher mind (GSHM). The GSHM is ageneral model of intelligence whereby moralfunctioning is integrated with cognitive,affective, and conative functioning, resultingin a flow of information between eight brainlevels functioning as an evaluative unitbetween stimulus and response.The foundation of this view of morality and ofcaring behavior is Charles Darwin's theory,largely ignored until recently, of thegrounding of morality in sexual instincts whichlater expand into (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  41
    On the 'Dynamic Brain' Metaphor.Péter Érdi - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):119-145.
    Dynamic systems theory offers conceptual andmathematical tools for describing the performance ofneural systems at very different levels oforganization. Three aspects of the dynamic paradigmare discussed, namely neural rhythms, neural andmental development, and macroscopic brain theories andmodels.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  78
    "Brain-Paradox" and "Embeddment": Do We Need a "Philosophy of the Brain"?Georg Northoff - 2001 - Brain and Mind 195 (2):195-211.
    Present discussions in philosophy of mind focuson ontological and epistemic characteristics ofmind and on mind-brain relations. In contrast,ontological and epistemic characteristics ofthe brain have rarely been thematized. Rather,philosophy seems to rely upon an implicitdefinition of the brain as "neuronal object''and "object of recognition'': henceontologically and epistemically distinct fromthe mind, characterized as "mental subject'' and"subject of recognition''. This leads to the"brain-paradox''. This ontological and epistemicdissociation between brain and mind can beconsidered central for the problems of mind (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  25
    Mind-Brain Puzzle Versus Mind-Physical World Identity.David A. Booth - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):348-349.
    To maintain my neutral monist or multi-aspect view of human reality (or indeed to defend the Cartesian dualism assumed by Puccetti & Dykes, it is wrong to relate the mind to the brain alone. A person's mind should be related to the physical environment, including the body, in addition to the brain. Furthermore, we are unlikely to understand the detailed functioning of an individual brain without knowing the history of its interactions with the external and internal environments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000