Results for 'Brain Processes'

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  1.  34
    Sensations, Experiences, and Brain Processes.John Heil - 1970 - Philosophy 45 (July):221-6.
    In his defence of the identity theory, Professor Smart has attempted to show that reports of mental states are strictly topic-neutral. If this were the case then it would follow that there is nothing logically wrong with the claim that the mind is the brain or that mental states are really nothing but brain states. Some phillosophers have argued that a fundamental objection to any form of materialism is that the latter makes an obvious logical blunder in identifying (...)
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  2. Further Remarks on Sensations and Brain Processes.J. J. C. Smart - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (July):406-407.
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  3. Could Mental States Be Brain Processes?Jerome A. Shaffer - 1961 - Journal of Philosophy 58 (December):813-22.
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  4.  63
    Sensations, Brain-Processes, and Colours.M. C. Bradley - 1963 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):385-93.
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  5. Brain Processes and Incorrigibility - a Reply to Professor Baier.J. J. C. Smart - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):68-70.
  6.  53
    Shaffer on the Identity of Mental States and Brain Processes.Robert C. Coburn - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (February):89-92.
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  7.  36
    Brain Processes and Sensations.Joseph Margolis - 1965 - Theoria 31 (2):133-38.
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  8.  22
    Brain Processes and Holistic Isomorphism: Moving Toward a Humanistic Neuroscience.Bruce L. Brown, Dawson W. Hedges & Edwin E. Gantt - 2008 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):356-374.
    A common quest among theoretical psychologists is the transformation of psychology to accommodate human agency and meaning. Several strong experimental methods are used in cognitive neuroscience but are based almost entirely upon a mechanistic ontology. A step toward rapprochement is proposed using precise and powerful experimental methods that are holistic, individualized, and compatible with an agentive ontology. Such methods must be applicable to all aspects of human experience, the subjective and agentive aspects, as well as the behavioural and the neurophysiological (...)
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  9.  23
    Note on Reductionism in Cognitive Psychology: Reification of Cognitive Processes Into Mind, Mind-Brain Equivalence, and Brain-Computer Analogy.Joseph M. Notterman - 2000 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):116-121.
    This note brings together three phenomena leading to a tendency toward reductionism in cognitive psychology. They are the reification of cognitive processes into an entity called mind; the identification of the mind with the brain; and the congruence by analogy of the brain with the digital computer. Also indicated is the need to continue studying the effects upon behavior of variables other than brain function. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  10.  13
    Toward a Model of Functional Brain Processes I: Central Nervous System Functional Micro-Architecture.Mark H. Bickhard - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (3):217-238.
    Standard semantic information processing models—information in; information processed; information out —lend themselves to standard models of the functioning of the brain in terms, e.g., of threshold-switch neurons connected via classical synapses. That is, in terms of sophisticated descendants of McCulloch and Pitts models. I argue that both the cognition and the brain sides of this framework are incorrect: cognition and thought are not constituted as forms of semantic information processing, and the brain does not function in terms (...)
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  11.  27
    Efferent Brain Processes and the Enactive Approach to Consciousness.Ralph D. Ellis - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):40-50.
    [opening paragraph]: Nicholas Humphrey argues persuasively that consciousness results from active and efferent rather than passive and afferent functions. These arguments contribute to the mounting recent evidence that consciousness is inseparable from the motivated action planning of creatures that in some sense are organismic and agent-like rather than passively mechanical and reactive in the way that digital computers are. Newton calls this new approach the ‘action theory of understanding'; Varela et al. dubbed it the ‘enactive’ view of consciousness. It was (...)
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  12. Are Sensations Still Brain Processes?Thomas W. Polger - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):1-21.
    Fifty years ago J. J. C. Smart published his pioneering paper, “Sensations and Brain Processes.” It is appropriate to mark the golden anniversary of Smart’s publication by considering how well his article has stood up, and how well the identity theory itself has fared. In this paper I first revisit Smart’s text, reflecting on how it has weathered the years. Then I consider the status of the identity theory in current philosophical thinking, taking into account the objections and (...)
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  13. Sensations and Brain Processes.Hans Flohr - 1995 - Behavioral Brain Research 71:157-61.
    A hypothesis on the physiological conditions of consciousness is presented. It is assumed that the occurrence of states of consciousness causally depends on the formation of complex representational structures. Cortical neural networks that exhibit a high representational activity develop higher-order, self-referential representations as a result of self-organizing processes. The occurrence of such states is identical with the appearance of states of consciousness. The underlying physiological processes can be identified. It is assumed that neural assemblies instantiate mental representations; hence (...)
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  14. Sensations and Brain Processes.J. J. C. Smart - 1959 - Philosophical Review 68 (April):141-56.
    SUPPOSE that I report that I have at this moment a roundish, blurry-edged after-image which is yellowish towards its edge and is orange towards its centre. What is it that I am reporting?l One answer to this question might be that I am not reporting anything, that when I say that it looks to me as though there is a roundish yellowy orange patch of light On the wall I am expressing some sort of temptation, the temptation to say that (...)
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  15. Understanding Consciousness: Its Function and Brain Processes.Gerd Sommerhoff - 2000 - Sage Publications.
    “This is surely the ultimate expression of the top-down approach to consciousness, written with Sommerhoff's characteristic clarity and precision. It says far more than other books four times the size of this admirably concise volume. This book is destined to become a pillar of the subject.” —Rodney Cotterill, Technical University of Denmark The problem of consciousness has been described as a mystery about which we are still in a terrible muddle and in Understanding Consciousness: Its Function and Brain (...), the author attempts to unravel this mystery by offering a clarification of the main concepts related to consciousness, and positing a comprehensive biological explanation. Consequently, this book will be ideal for a wide-range of upper level undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The author interprets consciousness as a property that can be possessed by many creatures lacking a language faculty and comprises all of the following: awareness of the surrounding world; awareness of the self as an entity; and awareness of such things as thoughts and feelings. He argues that a biological approach can achieve both the necessary conceptual clarifications and a joint explanation of these divisions of awareness in terms of just two accurately defined concepts of 'internal representation' and two empirically supported assumptions about the functional architecture of a specific set of brain processes. Despite this striking simplicity, his model covers these divisions of awareness both as objective faculties of the brain and as subjective experience. These conclusions are applied to a broad range of fundamental questions, including the biological rationale of subjective experience and where consciousness resides in the neural networks. (shrink)
     
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  16.  59
    Attention and Consciousness: Two Distinct Brain Processes.Christof Koch & Naotsugu Tsuchiya - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):16-22.
  17.  17
    Toward a Model of Functional Brain Processes II: Central Nervous System Functional Macro-Architecture.Mark H. Bickhard - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (4):377-407.
    The first paper in this pair developed a model of the nature of representation and cognition, and argued for a model of the micro-functioning of the brain on the basis of that model. In this sequel paper, starting with part III, this model is extended to address macro-functioning in the CNS. In part IV, I offer a discussion of an approach to brain functioning that has some similarities with, as well as differences from, the model presented here: sometimes (...)
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  18.  48
    Bilateral Brain Processes for Comprehending Natural Language.M. Jung-Beeman - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):512-518.
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  19. Sensations and Brain Processes: A Reply to J.J.C. Smart.John T. Stevenson - 1960 - Philosophical Review 69 (October):505-10.
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  20.  81
    Sensations and Brain Processes: A Rejoinder to Dr Pitcher and Mr Joske.J. J. C. Smart - 1960 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):252-54.
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  21.  37
    Sensations and Brain Processes: A Reply to Professor Smart.George Pitcher - 1960 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):150-7.
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  22.  12
    Senses, Sensations and Brain Processes: A Criticism of the Property Dualism Argument.Leonard J. Clapp - 1997 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):139-148.
  23.  11
    Sensations and Brain Processes: A Reply to Professor Smart.W. D. Joske - 1960 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):157-60.
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  24.  8
    Conscious Functions and Brain Processes.Benjamin Libet - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):685-686.
  25.  17
    Mentalist Monism: Consciousness as a Causal Emergent of Brain Processes.Roger Sperry - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):365.
  26.  5
    Is Attention an Appropriate Concept for Explaining Brain Processes?G. J. Dalenoort - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):341.
  27.  13
    Brain Processes in Emotional Perception: Motivated Attention.Harald Schupp, Bruce Cuthbert, Margaret Bradley, Charles Hillman, Alfons Hamm & Peter Lang - 2004 - Cognition and Emotion 18 (5):593-611.
  28. Brain Processes and Phenomenal Consciousness: A New and Specific Hypothesis.Hans Flohr - 1990 - Theory and Psychology 1:245-62.
    A hypothesis on the physiological conditions for the occurrence of phenomenal states is presented. It is suggested that the presence of phenomenal states depends on the rate at which neural assemblies are formed. Unconsciousness and various disturbances of phenomenal consciousness occur if the assembly formation rate is below a certain threshold level; if this level is surpassed, phenomenal states necessarily result. A critical production rate of neural assemblies is the necessary and sufficient condition for the occurrence of phenomenal states.
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  29. Qualia and Brain Processes.Hans Flohr - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction? Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.
  30.  40
    Making Sense of Soul and Sabbath Brain Processes and Making of Meaning.James B. Ashbrook - 1992 - Zygon 27 (1):31-49.
  31.  1
    Brain Processes and Incorrigibility.J. J. C. Smart - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):68-70.
  32. Professor Smart's 'Sensations and Brain Processes'.D. L. Gunner - 1967 - In C. P. Presley (ed.), The Identity Theory of Mind. University of Queensland Press. pp. 1--20.
  33.  21
    Senses, Sensations and Brain Processes.Leonard Clapp - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):139-148.
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  34.  8
    On the Current Problem Concerning the Localization of Brain Processes: A Critical Review.H. Hecaen & G. Lanteri-Laura - 1975 - Diogenes 23 (91):16-31.
  35.  2
    Senses, Sensations and Brain Processes: A Criticism of the Property Dualism Argument.Leonard Clapp - 1998 - Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):139-148.
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  36.  4
    The Development and Underlying Brain Processes of Pathological Altruism.V. Part - 2011 - In Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.), Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press. pp. 319.
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  37.  4
    The Order of Thought. Wittgenstein on Artificial Intelligence and Brain-Processes.Alberto Emiliani - 1990 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 2:125-138.
  38.  3
    Review of “Understanding Consciousness: Its Function and Brain Processes” by Gerd Sommerhoff. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cole - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):394-404.
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  39.  5
    Actions, Brain-Processes, and Determinism.R. E. Ewin - 1968 - Mind 77 (307):417-419.
  40. Brain Processes of Word Recognition as Revealed by Neurophysiological Imaging.Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  41. Sensations and Brain Processes: A Rejoinder.J. J. C. Smart - 1960 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38:252.
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  42.  8
    Processing of Sub- and Supra-Second Intervals in the Primate Brain Results From the Calibration of Neuronal Oscillators Via Sensory, Motor, and Feedback Processes.Daya S. Gupta - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    The processing of time intervals in the sub- to supra-second range by the brain is critical for the interaction of primates with their surroundings in activities, such as foraging and hunting. For an accurate processing of time intervals by the brain, representation of physical time within neuronal circuits is necessary. I propose that time dimension of the physical surrounding is represented in the brain by different types of neuronal oscillators, generating spikes or spike bursts at regular intervals. (...)
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  43.  20
    A New Perspective on the Functioning of the Brain and the Mechanisms Behind Conscious Processes.Joachim Keppler - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology, Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 4 (Article 242):1-6.
    An essential prerequisite for the development of a theory of consciousness is the clarification of the fundamental mechanisms underlying conscious processes. In this article I present an approach that sheds new light on these mechanisms. This approach builds on stochastic electrodynamics (SED), a promising theoretical framework that provides a deeper understanding of quantum systems and reveals the origin of quantum phenomena. I outline the most important concepts and findings of SED and interpret the neurophysiological body of evidence in the (...)
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  44. The New Phrenology: The Limits of Localizing Cognitive Processes in the Brain.William R. Uttal - 2001 - MIT Press.
  45.  20
    Phenomenal Consciousness: Understanding the Relation Between Experience and Neural Processes in the Brain, by Dimitris Platchias: Durham: Acumen, 2011, Pp. 256,£ 17.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Philip Goff - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):1-3.
    (2013). Phenomenal Consciousness: Understanding the Relation Between Experience and Neural Processes in the Brain, by Dimitris Platchias. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 91, No. 3, pp. 617-620. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2013.788529.
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  46. Lntroduction: Mental Processes in the Human Brain.Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice - 2008 - In Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.), Mental Processes in the Human Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 1.
     
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  47.  14
    Mental Processes in the Human Brain.Jon Driver, Patrick Haggard & Tim Shallice (eds.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Mental Processes in the Human Brain provides an integrative overview of the rapid advances and future challenges in understanding the neurobiological basis of mental processes that are characteristically human. With chapters from leading figures in the brain sciences, it will be essential for all those in the cognitive and brain sciences.
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  48.  37
    Processes of Change in Brain and Cognitive Development.M. H. Johnson & Y. Munakata - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):152-158.
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  49.  37
    Quantum Processes in the Brain: A Scientific Basis of Consciousness.Friedrich Beck & John C. Eccles - 2003 - In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. John Benjamins. pp. 49--141.
  50. Psychodynamics, Brain Function, Unconscious Processes, and Appreciation.Jan Fawcett - 2007 - Psychiatric Annals 37 (4):221.
     
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