Results for 'Brandon Yip'

712 found
Order:
See also
Brandon Yip
Australian National University
  1.  36
    Assertion, Stakes and Expected Blameworthiness: An Insensitive Invariantist Solution to the Bank Cases.Brandon Yip - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-19.
    Contextualists and Subject Sensitive Invariantists often cite the knowledge norm of assertion as part of their argument. They claim that the knowledge norms in conjunction with our intuitions about when a subject is properly asserting in low or high stakes contexts provides strong evidence that what counts as knowledge depends on practical factors. In this paper, I present new data to suggest they are mistaken in the way they think about cases involving high and low stakes and I show how (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  76
    Sober on Brandon on Screening-Off and the Levels of Selection.Robert N. Brandon, Janis Antonovics, Richard Burian, Scott Carson, Greg Cooper, Paul Sheldon Davies, Christopher Horvath, Brent D. Mishler, Robert C. Richardson, Kelly Smith & Peter Thrall - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (3):475-486.
    Sober (1992) has recently evaluated Brandon's (1982, 1990; see also 1985, 1988) use of Salmon's (1971) concept of screening-off in the philosophy of biology. He critiques three particular issues, each of which will be considered in this discussion.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  12
    Time and Mankind: An Historical and Philosophical Study of Mankind's Attitude to the Phenomena of Change. By S. G. F. Brandon. Pp. Xiv + 228. London: Hutchinson, 1951. 18s. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose & S. G. F. Brandon - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:215-215.
  4. Man and His Salvation: Studies in Memory of S. G. F. Brandon.Eric J. Sharpe, John R. Hinnells & S. G. F. Brandon - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (2):265-268.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  65
    Genes, Organisms, Populations: Controversies Over the Units of Selection.Robert N. Brandon & Richard Burian (eds.) - 1986 - Bradford.
    This anthology collects some of the most important papers on what is believed to be the major force in evolution, natural selection. An issue of great consequence in the philosophy of biology concerns the levels at which, and the units upon which selection acts. In recent years, biologists and philosophers have published a large number of papers bearing on this subject. The papers selected for inclusion in this book are divided into three main sections covering the history of the subject, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  6. Concepts and Methods in Evolutionary Biology.Robert N. Brandon - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Robert Brandon is one of the most important and influential of contemporary philosophers of biology. This collection of his recent essays covers all the traditional topics in the philosophy of evolutionary biology and as such could serve as an introduction to the field. There are essays on the nature of fitness, teleology, the structure of the theory of natural selection, and the levels of selection. The book also deals with newer topics that are less frequently discussed but are of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7.  19
    The Nature of Selection: Evolutionary Theory in Philosophical Focus.Robert N. Brandon - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (4):614.
  8.  71
    Adaptation and Evolutionary Theory.Robert N. Brandon - 1978 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (3):181.
  9. Biology's First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems.Daniel W. McShea & Robert N. Brandon - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
  10.  57
    From Icons to Symbols: Some Speculations on the Origins of Language. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon & Norbert Hornstein - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (2):169-189.
    This paper is divided into three sections. In the first section we offer a retooling of some traditional concepts, namely icons and symbols, which allows us to describe an evolutionary continuum of communication systems. The second section consists of an argument from theoretical biology. In it we explore the advantages and disadvantages of phenotypic plasticity. We argue that a range of the conditions that selectively favor phenotypic plasticity also favor a nongenetic transmission system that would allow for the inheritance of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  11.  97
    The Principle of Drift: Biology's First Law.Robert N. Brandon - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy 103 (7):319-335.
    Drift is to evolution as inertia is to Newtonian mechanics. Both are the "natural" or default states of the systems to which they apply. Both are governed by zero-force laws. The zero-force law in biology is stated here for the first time.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  12. Individuality, Pluralism, and the Phylogenetic Species Concept.Brent D. Mishler & Robert N. Brandon - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):397-414.
    The concept of individuality as applied to species, an important advance in the philosophy of evolutionary biology, is nevertheless in need of refinement. Four important subparts of this concept must be recognized: spatial boundaries, temporal boundaries, integration, and cohesion. Not all species necessarily meet all of these. Two very different types of pluralism have been advocated with respect to species, only one of which is satisfactory. An often unrecognized distinction between grouping and ranking components of any species concept is necessary. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  13. The Difference Between Selection and Drift: A Reply to Millstein. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):153-170.
    Millstein [Bio. Philos. 17 (2002) 33] correctly identies a serious problem with the view that natural selection and random drift are not conceptually distinct. She offers a solution to this problem purely in terms of differences between the processes of selection and drift. I show that this solution does not work, that it leaves the vast majority of real biological cases uncategorized. However, I do think there is a solution to the problem she raises, and I offer it here. My (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  14.  22
    The Principle of Drift: Biology’s First Law.Robert N. Brandon - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy 103 (7):319-335.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  15.  89
    The Indeterministic Character of Evolutionary Theory: No "No Hidden Variables Proof" but No Room for Determinism Either.Robert N. Brandon & Scott Carson - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):315-337.
    In this paper we first briefly review Bell's (1964, 1966) Theorem to see how it invalidates any deterministic "hidden variable" account of the apparent indeterminacy of quantum mechanics (QM). Then we show that quantum uncertainty, at the level of DNA mutations, can "percolate" up to have major populational effects. Interesting as this point may be it does not show any autonomous indeterminism of the evolutionary process. In the next two sections we investigate drift and natural selection as the locus of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  16. Does Biology Have Laws? The Experimental Evidence.Robert N. Brandon - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):457.
    In this paper I argue that we can best make sense of the practice of experimental evolutionary biology if we see it as investigating contingent, rather than lawlike, regularities. This understanding is contrasted with the experimental practice of certain areas of physics. However, this presents a problem for those who accept the Logical Positivist conception of law and its essential role in scientific explanation. I address this problem by arguing that the contingent regularities of evolutionary biology have a limited range (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  17. Legal Event Reasoning for Software Agents.Alexander Yip & Jim Cunningham - 2002 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (1-3):135-161.
  18.  76
    Neuroethics and National Security.Turhan Canli, Susan Brandon, William Casebeer, Philip J. Crowley, Don DuRousseau, Henry T. Greely & Alvaro Pascual-Leone - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):3 – 13.
  19. Body and Self: An Entangled Narrative.Priscilla Brandon - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):67-83.
    In the past three decades a number of narrative self-concepts have appeared in the philosophical literature. A central question posed in recent literature concerns the embodiment of the narrative self. Though one of the best-known narrative self-concepts is a non-embodied one, namely Dennett’s self as ‘a center of narrative gravity’, others argue that the narrative self should include a role for embodiment. Several arguments have been made in support of the latter claim, but these can be summarized in two main (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  24
    A General Case for Functional Pluralism.Robert N. Brandon - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer. pp. 97--104.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21.  92
    Biological Teleology: Questions and Explanations.Robert N. Brandon - 1981 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (2):91.
    This paper gives an account of evolutionary explanations in biology. Briefly, the explanations I am primarily concerned with are explanations of adaptations. These explanations are contrasted with other nonteleological evolutionary explanations. The distinction is made by distinguishing the different kinds of questions these different explanations serve to answer. The sense in which explanations of adaptations are teleological is spelled out.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  22.  98
    The Units of Selection Revisited: The Modules of Selection. [REVIEW]Robert N. Brandon - 1999 - Biology and Philosophy 14 (2):167-180.
    Richard Lewontin's (1970) early work on the units of selection initiated the conceptual and theoretical investigations that have led to the hierarchical perspective on selection that has reached near consensus status today. This paper explores other aspects of his work, work on what he termed continuity and quasi-independence, that connect to contemporary explorations of modularity in development and evolution. I characterize such modules and argue that they are the true units of selection in that they are what evolution by natural (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  23.  41
    What's Wrong with the Emergentist Statistical Interpretation of Natural Selection and Random Drift.Robert N. Brandon & Grant Ramsey - 2007 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 66--84.
  24.  7
    The Structure of Biological Science.Robert N. Brandon - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):224-227.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  25.  9
    Is Sharing Specific Autobiographical Memories a Distinct Form of Self-Disclosure?Denise R. Beike, Nicole R. Brandon & Holly E. Cole - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (4):434-450.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  52
    Four Solutions for Four Puzzles.Robert N. Brandon & Daniel W. McShea - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):737-744.
    Barrett et al. present four puzzles for the ZFEL-view of evolution that we present in our 2010 book, Biology’s First Law: The Tendency for Diversity and Complexity to Increase in Evolutionary Systems. Our intent in writing this book was to present a radically different way to think about evolution. To the extent that it really is radical, it will be easy to misunderstand. We think Barrett et al. have misunderstood several crucial points and so we welcome the opportunity to clarify.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  96
    The Empirical Nonequivalence of Genic and Genotypic Models of Selection: A (Decisive) Refutation of Genic Selectionism and Pluralistic Genic Selectionism.Robert N. Brandon & H. Frederik Nijhout - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (3):277-297.
    Genic selectionists (Williams 1966; Dawkins 1976) defend the view that genes are the (unique) units of selection and that all evolutionary events can be adequately represented at the genic level. Pluralistic genic selectionists (Sterelny and Kitcher 1988; Waters 1991; Dawkins 1982) defend the weaker view that in many cases there are multiple equally adequate accounts of evolutionary events, but that always among the set of equally adequate representations will be one at the genic level. We describe a range of cases (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28.  63
    Natural Selection.Robert Brandon - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection provided the first, and only, causal-mechanistic account of the existence of adaptations in nature. As such, it provided the first, and only, scientific alternative to the “argument from design”. That alone would account for its philosophical significance. But the theory also raises other philosophical questions not encountered in the study of the theories of physics. Unfortunately the concept of natural selection is intimately intertwined with the other basic concepts of evolutionary theory—such as the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29. Bridging the Gap Between Medical and Bioinformatics: An Ontological Case Study in Colon Carcinoma.Anand Kumar, Yum Lina Yip, Barry Smith & Pierre Grenon - 2006 - Computers in Biology and Medicine 36 (7):694--711.
    Ontological principles are needed in order to bridge the gap between medical and biological information in a robust and computable fashion. This is essential in order to draw inferences across the levels of granularity which span medicine and biology, an example of which include the understanding of the roles of tumor markers in the development and progress of carcinoma. Such information integration is also important for the integration of genomics information with the information contained in the electronic patient records in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  79
    Theory and Experiment in Evolutionary Biology.Robert N. Brandon - 1994 - Synthese 99 (1):59 - 73.
  31.  47
    The Levels of Selection.Robert Brandon - 1982 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:315 - 323.
    In this paper Wimsatt's analysis of units of selection is taken as defining the units of selection question. A definition of levels of selection is offered and it is shown that the levels of selection question is quite different from the units of selection question. Some of the relations between units and levels are briefly explored. It is argued that the levels of selection question is the question relevant to explanatory concerns, and it is suggested that it is the question (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  32.  22
    Why Flying Dogs Are Rare: A General Theory of Luck in Evolutionary Transitions.Leonore Fleming & Robert Brandon - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 49:24-31.
    There is a worry that the ‘major transitions in evolution’ represent an arbitrary group of events. This worry is warranted, and we show why. We argue that the transition to a new level of hierarchy necessarily involves a nonselectionist chance process. Thus any unified theory of evolutionary transitions must be more like a general theory of fortuitous luck, rather than a rigid formulation of expected events. We provide a systematic account of evolutionary transitions based on a second-order regularity of chance (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33.  74
    Partnership with God: A Partial Solution to the Problem of Petitionary Prayer.Nicholas D. Smith & Andrew C. Yip - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):395 - 410.
    Why would God make us ask for some good He might supply, and why would it be right for God to withhold that good unless and until we asked for it? We explain why present defences of petitionary prayer are insufficient, but argue that a world in which God makes us ask for some goods and then supplies them in response to our petitions adds value to the world that would not be available in worlds in which God simply supplied (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  5
    Extending Voice and Autonomy Through Participatory Action Research: Ethical and Practical IssuesReflections on a Workshop Held at Durham University, November 2018.Sui Ting Kong, Sarah Banks, Toby Brandon, Stewart Chappell, Helen Charnley, Se Kwang Hwang, Danielle Rudd, Sue Shaw, Sam Slatcher & Nicki Ward - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-10.
  35.  31
    Drift Sometimes Dominates Selection, and Vice Versa: A Reply to Clatterbuck, Sober and Lewontin.Robert Brandon & Leonore Fleming - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (4):577-585.
    Clatterbuck et al. (Biol Philos 28: 577–592, 2013) argue that there is no fact of the matter whether selection dominates drift or vice versa in any particular case of evolution. Their reasons are not empirically based; rather, they are purely conceptual. We show that their conceptual presuppositions are unmotivated, unnecessary and overly complex. We also show that their conclusion runs contrary to current biological practice. The solution is to recognize that evolution involves a probabilistic sampling process, and that drift is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Causal Realism and the Laws of Nature.Richard Corry, Robert N. Brandon, H. Frederik Nijhout, Richard Dawid, Ron Mallon, Jonathan M. Weinberg & Hong Yu Wong - 2006 - In Borchert (ed.), Philosophy of Science. Macmillan. pp. 261-276.
    This paper proposes a revision of our understanding of causation that is designed to address what Hartry Field has suggested is the central problem in the metaphysics of causation today: reconciling Bertrand Russell’s arguments that the concept of causation can play no role in the advanced sciences with Nancy Cartwright’s arguments that causal concepts are essential to a scientific understanding of the world. The paper shows that Russell’s main argument is, ironically, very similar to an argument that Cartwright has put (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  2
    What's Wrong with the Emergentist Statistical Interpretation of Natural Selection and Random Drift?Robert Brandon & Grant Ramsey - 2007 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge: pp. 66-84.
    Population-level theories of evolution—the stock and trade of population genetics—are statistical theories par excellence. But what accounts for the statistical character of population-level phenomena? One view is that the population-level statistics are a product of, are generated by, probabilities that attach to the individuals in the population. On this conception, population-level phenomena are explained by individual-level probabilities and their population-level combinations. Another view, which arguably goes back to Fisher but has been defended recently, is that the population-level statistics are sui (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38.  88
    Why Reciprocal Altruism is Not a Kind of Group Selection.Grant Ramsey & Robert Brandon - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (3):385-400.
    Reciprocal altruism was originally formulated in terms of individual selection and most theorists continue to view it in this way. However, this interpretation of reciprocal altruism has been challenged by Sober and Wilson (1998). They argue that reciprocal altruism (as well as all other forms of altruism) evolves by the process of group selection. In this paper, we argue that the original interpretation of reciprocal altruism is the correct one. We accomplish this by arguing that if fitness attaches to (at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  54
    The Propensity Interpretation of 'Fitness'--No Interpretation is No Substitute.Robert Brandon & John Beatty - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (2):342-347.
  40.  32
    Philosophy of Biology.Robert Brandon & Alex Rosenberg - 2003 - In Peter Clark & Katherine Hawley (eds.), Philosophy of Science Today. Oxford University Press. pp. 147--180.
  41.  5
    Motivation, Goals for Study Abroad and Adaptation of Mainland Chinese Students in Hong Kong.Fraide A. Ganotice, Kevin Downing, Barbara Chan & Lee Wai Yip - forthcoming - Educational Studies:1-16.
    There is a dramatic increase in the number of mainland Chinese students coming to Hong Kong to attend various courses. With the aim of developing a profound understanding of the adaptation of the m...
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  39
    Human Rights, Animal Wrongs? Exploring Attitudes Toward Animal Use and Possibilities for Change.Aldert Vrij, Sarah Knight, Doug Brandon & Kim Bard - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (3):251-272.
    Presented here are three research studies examining psychological characteristics underlying attitudes toward the use of nonhuman animals: beliefs and value systems; their comparative impact on opinions; and empathetic responses to humans and to animals. The first study demonstrated that the attitudes of laypeople are context dependent: different sets of beliefs underlie attitudes toward various types of animal use. Belief in the existence of alternatives was especially important, accounting alone for 40% of the variance in attitudes. The second study compared the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43.  28
    A Structural Description of Evolutionary Theory.Robert N. Brandon - 1980 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:427 - 439.
    The principle of natural selection is stated. It connects fitness values (actual reproductive success) with expected fitness values. The term 'adaptedness' is used for expected fitness values. The principle of natural selection explains differential fitness in terms of relative adaptedness. It is argued that this principle is absolutely central to Darwinian evolutionary theory. The empirical content of the principle of natural selection is examined. It is argued that the principle itself has no empirical biological content, but that the presuppositions of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  44.  30
    The Search for Phonology in Other Species.Moira J. Yip - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):442-446.
  45.  39
    A Non-Newtonian Newtonian Model of Evolution: The ZFEL View.Robert N. Brandon - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):702-715.
  46.  30
    Grene on Mechanism and Reductionism: More Than Just a Side Issue.Robert N. Brandon - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:345 - 353.
    In this paper the common association between ontological reductionism and a methodological position called 'Mechanism' is discussed. Three major points are argued for: (1) Mechanism is not to be identified with reductionism in any of its forms; in fact, mechanism leads to a non-reductionist ontology. (2) Biological methodology is thoroughly mechanistic. (3) Mechanism is compatible with at least one form of teleology. Along the way the nature and value of scientific explanations, some recent controversies in biology and why reductionism has (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  47.  49
    An Ontology for Carcinoma Classification for Clinical Bioinformatics.Anand Kumar, Yum Lina Yip, Barry Smith, Dirk Marwede & Daniel Novotny - 2005 - Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 116 (1):635-640.
    There are a number of existing classifications and staging schemes for carcinomas, one of the most frequently used being the TNM classification. Such classifications represent classes of entities which exist at various anatomical levels of granularity. We argue that in order to apply such representations to the Electronic Health Records one needs sound ontologies which take into consideration the diversity of the domains which are involved in clinical bioinformatics. Here we outline a formal theory for addressing these issues in a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  26
    Examining the Preparation and Ongoing Support of Adults to Take Their Medications as Prescribed in Kidney Transplantation.Allison Williams, Kimberley Crawford, Elizabeth Manias, Christine Ellis, Kim Mullins, Kathy Howe, Elaine Kennedy, Orla Maney, Tia Mark, Debbie Gregory, Emma Van Hardeveld, Doris Yip & Jac Kee Low - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (2):180-186.
  49.  23
    Designing Health Innovation Networks Using Complexity Science and Systems Thinking: The CoNEKTR Model.Cameron D. Norman, Jill Charnaw-Burger, Andrea L. Yip, Sam Saad & Charlotte Lombardo - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (5):1016-1023.
  50.  8
    A Field Ion Microscope Study of Some Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys.Brian Ralph & D. G. Brandon - 1963 - Philosophical Magazine 8 (90):919-934.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 712