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Branka Arsić [11]Branka M. Arsić [1]
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Branka Arsic
Columbia University
  1. The Experimental Ordinary: Deleuze on Eating and Anorexic Elegance.Branka Arsic - 2008 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 2 (Suppl):34-59.
    The paper discusses Deleuze's concept of the feminine through exploration of the questions of eating, cooking, and specifically anorexia, as well as an ‘anorexic relation’ to fashion and dressing. It argues that anorexia should be understood as a micro-political experimentation in fashioning one's own body on its flight to becoming woman. In accordance with Deleuze's ontology of the surface, the anorexic body can be seen as the invention of the BWO that forms an assemblage with clothes and, in so becoming (...)
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  2.  30
    Bodies, Masses, Power, Spinoza and His Contemporaries.Branka Arsic - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (4):892-893.
    Warren Montag’s book is a fine analysis of the ways in which Spinoza’s materialism, as it was formulated in The Ethics, affects his political theory. Even though Montag’s analysis is historical, and sensitive to the theoretical and political context of Spinoza’s thinking, it also takes decisively into account contemporary political theories and so works to frame the context within which Montag himself thinks. Constantly referring to Louis Althusser’s remarks about the connection between Spinoza’s philosophy and the former’s theory of ideology, (...)
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  3. Active Habits and Passive Events or Bartleby.Branka Arsić - 2003 - In Paul Patton & John Protevi (eds.), Between Deleuze and Derrida. Continuum. pp. 135--57.
     
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  4.  21
    Bartleby or a Loose Existence: Melville with Jonathan Edwards.Branka Arsic - 2006 - Janus Head 9 (1):35-60.
    Following allusions that Melville scatters throughout “Bartleby the Scrivener,” the article develops the writer’s subtle criticism of Jonathan Edwards. The attorney’s way of thinking is taken as an example of reasoning on the basis of “necessary” assumptions, which Melville finds in Edwards’ “The Freedom of the Will.” From the perspective of that philosophy, Barleby’s existence appears inexplicable, or understandable only as a “loose existence,” which, according to Edwards, would have to represent an error in the universe. By anayzing Edwards’ way (...)
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  5.  23
    The Huron-Wendat Feast of the Dead: Indian-European Encounters in Early North America.Branka Arsić - 2013 - Common Knowledge 19 (1):143-144.
  6.  11
    “Decorate the Dungeon”: A Dialogue in Place of an Introduction.Jeffrey M. Perl, Colin Richmond, Abdulaziz Sachedina, Branka Arsić & Anonymous Envoi - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (2):223-232.
    In the place of an introduction to part 5 of the Common Knowledge symposium on forms of quietism, the journal's editor and one of its longtime columnists discuss, in dialogue format, the case of Thomas More. Could he have evaded martyrdom at the hands of Henry VIII and Thomas Cromwell? One discussant argues that More could not have done so without contemptibly abandoning his principles and surrendering fully to despotism. The other discussant disagrees, suggesting that More had to abandon some (...)
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  7.  14
    Mary Rowlandson and the Phenomenology of Patient Suffering.Branka Arsić - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (2):247-275.
    This article is a contribution to the fifth part of the Common Knowledge symposium on forms of quietism. Responding to a sense that prior installments of the symposium had overlooked the phenomenology of quietism, of patient suffering, the essay details the daily life of Mary Rowlandson's captivity during King Philip's War in the 17th century and, in particular, her strategies for surviving the breakdown of every basic taxonomy that had until then structured her life in Puritan New England. Refusing either (...)
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  8.  11
    Melville's Celibatory Machines -- Bartleby, Pierre, and The Paradise of Bachelors.Branka Arsić - 2005 - Diacritics 35 (4):81-100.
    Branka Arsić's essay analyzes the complex relations among law, writing, and marriage described by Melville in Pierre, "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids," and Bartleby, the Scrivener. The major argument of the essay is that Melville conceives of both writing and marriage as "celibatory machines," cut in two by the power of the law, which explains the obsessive return to the question of the law in his writing. The celibatory machine functions to divide the same in two (...)
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  9.  10
    The Active Synthesis of Reflection-the Eye on the Bottom of Barrel.Branka M. Arsić - 1997 - Theoria 40 (3):7-58.
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  10. The Other Emerson.Branka Arsic & Cary Wolfe (eds.) - 2010 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson is one of the most significant figures in nineteenth-century American literature and culture-indeed, this collection argues, in the history of philosophy. The Other Emerson is a thorough reassessment of the philosophical underpinnings, theoretical innovations, and ethical and political implications of the prose writings of one of America's most enduring thinkers. Considering Emerson first and foremost as a daring and original thinker, _The Other Emerson_ focuses on three Emersonian subjects-subjectivity, the political, and the nature of philosophy-and range in (...)
     
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  11. The Passive Eye: Gaze and Subjectivity in Berkeley (Via Beckett).Branka Arsić - 2003 - Stanford University Press.
    The Passive Eye is a revolutionary and historically rich account of Berkeley’s theory of vision. In this formidable work, the author considers the theory of the embodied subject and its passions in light of a highly dynamic conception of infinity. Arsic shows the profound affinities between Berkeley and Spinoza, and offers a highly textual reading of Berkeley on the concept of an “exhausted subjectivity.” The author begins by following the Renaissance universe of vision, particularly the paradoxical elusive nature of mirrors, (...)
     
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