Results for 'Brendan Dill'

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Brendan de Kenessey
University Of Toronto
  1. The Addict in Us All.Brendan Dill & Richard Holton - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychiatry 5 (139):01-20.
    In this paper, we contend that the psychology of addiction is similar to the psychology of ordinary, non-addictive temptation in important respects, and explore the ways in which these parallels can illuminate both addiction and ordinary action. The incentive salience account of addiction proposed by Robinson and Berridge (1993; 2001; 2008) entails that addictive desires are not in their nature different from many of the desires had by non-addicts; what is different is rather the way that addictive desires are acquired, (...)
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  2. Moral Psychology as Accountability.Brendan Dill & Stephen Darwall - 2014 - In Justin D'Arms Daniel Jacobson (ed.), Moral Psychology and Human Agency: Philosophical Essays on the Science of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 40-83.
    Recent work in moral philosophy has emphasized the foundational role played by interpersonal accountability in the analysis of moral concepts such as moral right and wrong, moral obligation and duty, blameworthiness, and moral responsibility (Darwall 2006; 2013a; 2013b). Extending this framework to the field of moral psychology, we hypothesize that our moral attitudes, emotions, and motives are also best understood as based in accountability. Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, we argue that the implicit aim of the central (...)
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  3. Mechanisms and the Evidence Hierarchy.Brendan Clarke, Donald Gillies, Phyllis Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):339-360.
    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) makes use of explicit procedures for grading evidence for causal claims. Normally, these procedures categorise evidence of correlation produced by statistical trials as better evidence for a causal claim than evidence of mechanisms produced by other methods. We argue, in contrast, that evidence of mechanisms needs to be viewed as complementary to, rather than inferior to, evidence of correlation. In this paper we first set out the case for treating evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence of correlation in (...)
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  4. Anomalous Experience in Everyday Life: Its Significance for Psychopathology.Brendan A. Maher - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):547-70.
    From the wide array of phenomena that constitute the elements of mental illness we must of necessity choose a limited segment of the spectrum of pathology. The vehicle for the development of the argument will be the heterogeneous group of disorders known collectively as schizophrenia. Although we will follow current usage of the singular noun, the heterogeneity that led Bleuler to refer to “the group of schizophrenias” must be borne in mind if we are to understand the degrees of variability (...)
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  5.  34
    From Euclidean Geometry to Knots and Nets.Brendan Larvor - 2017 - Synthese:1-22.
    This paper assumes the success of arguments against the view that informal mathematical proofs secure rational conviction in virtue of their relations with corresponding formal derivations. This assumption entails a need for an alternative account of the logic of informal mathematical proofs. Following examination of case studies by Manders, De Toffoli and Giardino, Leitgeb, Feferman and others, this paper proposes a framework for analysing those informal proofs that appeal to the perception or modification of diagrams or to the inspection or (...)
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  6. Verbal Disputes and Substantiveness.Brendan Balcerak Jackson - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S1):31-54.
    One way to challenge the substantiveness of a particular philosophical issue is to argue that those who debate the issue are engaged in a merely verbal dispute. For example, it has been maintained that the apparent disagreement over the mind/brain identity thesis is a merely verbal dispute, and thus that there is no substantive question of whether or not mental properties are identical to neurological properties. The goal of this paper is to help clarify the relationship between mere verbalness and (...)
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  7.  59
    The Evidence That Evidence-Based Medicine Omits.Brendan Clarke, Donald Gillies, Phyllis Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson - unknown
    According to current hierarchies of evidence for EBM, evidence of correlation is always more important than evidence of mechanisms when evaluating and establishing causal claims. We argue that evidence of mechanisms needs to be treated alongside evidence of correlation. This is for three reasons. First, correlation is always a fallible indicator of causation, subject in particular to the problem of confounding; evidence of mechanisms can in some cases be more important than evidence of correlation when assessing a causal claim. Second, (...)
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  8.  33
    Myth Dill, Walde Antike Mythen. Medien, Transformationen Und Konstruktionen. Pp. Xiv + 760, Ills, Map. Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2009. Cased, €169.95, US$238. ISBN: 978-3-11-020909-9. [REVIEW]Katharina Lorenz - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):302-304.
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  9. Modelling Mechanisms with Causal Cycles.Brendan Clarke, Bert Leuridan & Jon Williamson - 2014 - Synthese 191 (8):1-31.
    Mechanistic philosophy of science views a large part of scientific activity as engaged in modelling mechanisms. While science textbooks tend to offer qualitative models of mechanisms, there is increasing demand for models from which one can draw quantitative predictions and explanations. Casini et al. (Theoria 26(1):5–33, 2011) put forward the Recursive Bayesian Networks (RBN) formalism as well suited to this end. The RBN formalism is an extension of the standard Bayesian net formalism, an extension that allows for modelling the hierarchical (...)
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  10. Towards a Common Semantics for English Count and Mass Nouns.Brendan S. Gillon - 1992 - Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (6):597 - 639.
    English mass noun phrases & count noun phrases differ only minimally grammatically. The basis for the difference is ascribed to a difference in the features +/-CT. These features serve the morphosyntactic function of determining the available options for the assigment of grammatical number, itself determined by the features +/-PL: +CT places no restriction on the available options, while -CT, in the unmarked case, restricts the available options to -PL. They also serve the semantic function of determining the sort of denotation (...)
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  11.  83
    The Readings of Plural Noun Phrases in English.Brendan S. Gillon - 1987 - Linguistics and Philosophy 10 (2):199 - 219.
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  12. Perceptual Inference Through Global Lexical Similarity.Brendan T. Johns & Michael N. Jones - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):103-120.
    The literature contains a disconnect between accounts of how humans learn lexical semantic representations for words. Theories generally propose that lexical semantics are learned either through perceptual experience or through exposure to regularities in language. We propose here a model to integrate these two information sources. Specifically, the model uses the global structure of memory to exploit the redundancy between language and perception in order to generate inferred perceptual representations for words with which the model has no perceptual experience. We (...)
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  13. Defusing Easy Arguments for Numbers.Brendan Balcerak Jackson - 2013 - Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (6):447-461.
    Pairs of sentences like the following pose a problem for ontology: (1) Jupiter has four moons. (2) The number of moons of Jupiter is four. (2) is intuitively a trivial paraphrase of (1). And yet while (1) seems ontologically innocent, (2) appears to imply the existence of numbers. Thomas Hofweber proposes that we can resolve the puzzle by recognizing that sentence (2) is syntactically derived from, and has the same meaning as, sentence (1). Despite appearances, the expressions ‘the number of (...)
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  14.  36
    Why the Naïve Derivation Recipe Model Cannot Explain How Mathematicians’ Proofs Secure Mathematical Knowledge.Brendan Larvor - 2016 - Philosophia Mathematica 24 (3):401-404.
    The view that a mathematical proof is a sketch of or recipe for a formal derivation requires the proof to function as an argument that there is a suitable derivation. This is a mathematical conclusion, and to avoid a regress we require some other account of how the proof can establish it.
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  15. How to Think About Informal Proofs.Brendan Larvor - 2012 - Synthese 187 (2):715-730.
    It is argued in this study that (i) progress in the philosophy of mathematical practice requires a general positive account of informal proof; (ii) the best candidate is to think of informal proofs as arguments that depend on their matter as well as their logical form; (iii) articulating the dependency of informal inferences on their content requires a redefinition of logic as the general study of inferential actions; (iv) it is a decisive advantage of this conception of logic that it (...)
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  16. Metaphysics, Verbal Disputes and the Limits of Charity.Brendan Balcerak Jackson - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):412-434.
    Intuitively, (1)-(3) seem to express genuine claims (true or false) about what the world is like, attempts to correctly describe parts of extra-linguistic reality. By contrast, it is tempting to regard (4)-(6) as merely reflecting decisions (or conventions, or dispositions, or rules) concerning the terms in which that extra-linguistic reality is described, decisions about which things to label with 'vixen', 'bachelor' or 'cup'.
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  17. Causality in Medicine with Particular Reference to the Viral Causation of Cancers.Brendan Clarke - 2011 - Dissertation, University College London
    In this thesis, I give a metascientific account of causality in medicine. I begin with two historical cases of causal discovery. These are the discovery of the causation of Burkitt’s lymphoma by the Epstein-Barr virus, and of the various viral causes suggested for cervical cancer. These historical cases then support a philosophical discussion of causality in medicine. This begins with an introduction to the Russo- Williamson thesis (RWT), and discussion of a range of counter-arguments against it. Despite these, I argue (...)
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  18.  2
    Geoengineering, Ocean Fertilization, and the Problem of Permissible Pollution.Benjamin Hale & Lisa Dilling - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (2):190--212.
    Many geoengineering projects have been proposed to address climate change, including both solar radiation management and carbon removal techniques. Some of these methods would introduce additional compounds into the atmosphere or the ocean. This poses a difficult conundrum: Is it permissible to remediate one pollutant by introducing a second pollutant into a system that has already been damaged, threatened, or altered? We frame this conundrum as the ‘‘Problem of Permissible Pollution.’’ In this paper, we explore this problem by taking up (...)
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  19. Samuel Dill, Roman Society From Nero to Marcus Aurelius. [REVIEW]H. Jones - 1905 - Hibbert Journal 4:200.
     
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  20.  70
    What is Dialectical Philosophy of Mathematics?Brendan Larvor - 2001 - Philosophia Mathematica 9 (2):212-229.
    The late Imre Lakatos once hoped to found a school of dialectical philosophy of mathematics. The aim of this paper is to ask what that might possibly mean. But Lakatos's philosophy has serious shortcomings. The paper elaborates a conception of dialectical philosophy of mathematics that repairs these defects and considers the work of three philosophers who in some measure fit the description: Yehuda Rav, Mary Leng and David Corfield.
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  21.  64
    Lakatos as Historian of Mathematics.Brendan P. Larvor - 1997 - Philosophia Mathematica 5 (1):42-64.
    This paper discusses the connection between the actual history of mathematics and Lakatos's philosophy of mathematics, in three parts. The first points to studies by Lakatos and others which support his conception of mathematics and its history. In the second I suggest that the apparent poverty of Lakatosian examples may be due to the way in which the history of mathematics is usually written. The third part argues that Lakatos is right to hold philosophy accountable to history, even if Lakatos's (...)
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  22.  10
    Anomalous Experience in Everyday Life: Its Significance for Psychopathology.Brendan A. Maher - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):547-570.
    From the wide array of phenomena that constitute the elements of mental illness we must of necessity choose a limited segment of the spectrum of pathology. The vehicle for the development of the argument will be the heterogeneous group of disorders known collectively as schizophrenia. Although we will follow current usage of the singular noun, the heterogeneity that led Bleuler to refer to “the group of schizophrenias” must be borne in mind if we are to understand the degrees of variability (...)
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  23.  19
    (U.) Dill and (C.) Walde Eds. Antike Mythen. Medien, Transformationen Und Konstruktionen. Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2009. Pp. Xii + 760. €169.95. 9783110209099. [REVIEW]Etienne Dunant - 2011 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:170-171.
  24.  67
    Cognitive Theories of Mental Illness.Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended to (...)
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  25.  40
    Heidegger, Art, and the Overcoming of Metaphysics.Matt Dill - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):294-311.
    In this paper, I advance a new interpretation of Heidegger's reflections on art as we find them in his essay, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art’. I begin, in Section 1, by uncovering the fundamental concern that motivates Heidegger's essay. I show that Heidegger's reflections on art are part of his attempt to uncover a path beyond the history of metaphysics. I then suggest, in Section 2, that while Heidegger does think that art may allow for the overcoming of (...)
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  26.  18
    Attentional Bias for Threatening Facial Expressions in Anxiety: Manipulation of Stimulus Duration.Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg, Sara J. Falla & Lucy R. Hamilton - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (6):737-753.
  27.  27
    Love as Delusion, Delusions of Love: Erotomania, Narcissism and Shame.Brendan D. Kelly - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (1):15-19.
    Erotomania has a long, colourful history in psychiatry. It is a rare condition in which the patient develops the belief that he or she is loved from afar by another person. The subject is generally female, though men predominate in forensic samples. The object is generally perceived to belong to a higher social class, reflecting a sociopolitical element in the construction of love. Erotomania requires active treatment and risk management as it can be associated with stalking and other offending behaviour. (...)
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  28.  26
    What Philosophy of Mathematical Practice Can Teach Argumentation Theory About Diagrams and Pictures.Brendan Larvor - 2013 - In Andrew Aberdein & Ian J. Dove (eds.), The Argument of Mathematics. Springer. pp. 239--253.
  29.  51
    Dill's Roman Society Roman Society in the Last Century of the Western Empire. By Samuel Dill, M.A., Professor of Greek in Queen's College, Belfast; Sometime Fellow and Tutor of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Second Edition, Revised. London : Macmillan. 495 Pages. Price 8s. Qd. Net. [REVIEW]P. V. M. Benecke - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (05):265-267.
  30.  55
    Limiting the Killing in War: Military Necessity and the St. Petersburg Assumption.Janina Dill & Henry Shue - 2012 - Ethics and International Affairs 26 (3):311-333.
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  31.  1
    The Decision Phases Framework for Public Engagement: Engaging Stakeholders About Gene Editing in the Wild.S. Kathleen Barnhill-Dilling, Adam Kokotovich & Jason A. Delborne - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S2):48-61.
  32.  24
    Dill's Roman Society Roman Society From Nero to Marcus Aurelius. By Samuel Dill, M.A. Macmillan. Pp. Xxii + 639. Price 15s. Net. [REVIEW]Franklin T. Richards - 1905 - The Classical Review 19 (02):131-134.
  33. Schizophrenia, Aberrant Utterance and Delusions of Control: The Disconnection of Speech and Thought, and the Connection of Experience and Belief.Brendan Maher - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (1):1-22.
  34.  14
    Dill's Roman Society. [REVIEW]P. V. M. Benecke - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (5):265-267.
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  35.  16
    Covert and Overt Orienting of Attention to Emotional Faces in Anxiety.Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg & Neil H. Millar - 2000 - Cognition and Emotion 14 (6):789-808.
  36. The Problem of Evil in Virtual Worlds.Brendan Shea - 2017 - In Mark Silcox (ed.), Experience Machines: The Philosophy of Virtual Worlds. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 137-155.
    In its original form, Nozick’s experience machine serves as a potent counterexample to a simplistic form of hedonism. The pleasurable life offered by the experience machine, its seems safe to say, lacks the requisite depth that many of us find necessary to lead a genuinely worthwhile life. Among other things, the experience machine offers no opportunities to establish meaningful relationships, or to engage in long-term artistic, intellectual, or political projects that survive one’s death. This intuitive objection finds some support in (...)
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  37.  46
    Lakatos: An Introduction.Brendan Larvor - 1998 - Routledge.
    _Lakatos: An Introduction_ provides a thorough overview of both Lakatos's thought and his place in twentieth century philosophy. It is an essential and insightful read for students and anyone interested in the philosophy of science.
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  38. Ambiguity, Generality, and Indeterminacy: Tests and Definitions. [REVIEW]Brendan S. Gillon - 1990 - Synthese 85 (3):391 - 416.
    The problem addressed is that of finding a sound characterization of ambiguity. Two kinds of characterizations are distinguished: tests and definitions. Various definitions of ambiguity are critically examined and contrasted with definitions of generality and indeterminacy, concepts with which ambiguity is sometimes confused. One definition of ambiguity is defended as being more theoretically adequate than others which have been suggested by both philosophers and linguists. It is also shown how this definition of ambiguity obviates a problem thought to be posed (...)
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  39. Beyond Logical Form.Brendan Jackson - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (2):347 - 380.
    Notice that each of (1)–(4) is an instance of a more general pattern. For example, we could replace ‘black’ in (1) with any of a wide range of other adjectives such as ‘furry’ or ‘hungry’ or ‘three-legged’, without rendering the entailment invalid or any less obvious. Similarly, there are a number of verbs that occur in entailments parallel to (3): ‘Moe boiled the water; so the water boiled’; ‘Bart blew up the school; so the school blew up’; ‘Homer sank the (...)
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  40.  26
    Number Word Constructions, Degree Semantics and the Metaphysics of Degrees.Brendan Balcerak Jackson & Doris Penka - 2017 - Linguistics and Philosophy 40 (4):347-372.
    A central question for ontology is the question of whether numbers really exist. But it seems easy to answer this question in the affirmative. The truth of a sentence like ‘Seven students came to the party’ can be established simply by looking around at the party and counting students. A trivial paraphrase of is ‘The number of students who came to the party is seven’. But appears to entail the existence of a number, and so it seems that we must (...)
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  41.  59
    Hormone Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria:An Ethical Analysis.Brendan S. Abel - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S23-S27.
  42. Fictional Realism and Indeterminate Identity.Brendan Murday - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Research 40:205-225.
    Fictional realists hold that fictional characters are real entities. However, Anthony Everett [“Against Fictional Realism”, Journal of Philosophy (2005)] notes that some fictions leave it indeterminate whether character A is identical to character B, while other fictions depict A as simultaneously identical and distinct from B. Everett argues that these fictions commit the realist to indeterminate and impossible identity relations among actual entities, and that as such realism is untenable. This paper defends fictional realism: for fictions depicting non-classical identity between (...)
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  43.  52
    Decoding the Brain: Neural Representation and the Limits of Multivariate Pattern Analysis in Cognitive Neuroscience.J. Brendan Ritchie, David Michael Kaplan & Colin Klein - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (2):581-607.
    Since its introduction, multivariate pattern analysis, or ‘neural decoding’, has transformed the field of cognitive neuroscience. Underlying its influence is a crucial inference, which we call the decoder’s dictum: if information can be decoded from patterns of neural activity, then this provides strong evidence about what information those patterns represent. Although the dictum is a widely held and well-motivated principle in decoding research, it has received scant philosophical attention. We critically evaluate the dictum, arguing that it is false: decodability is (...)
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  44.  77
    Truth Vs. Pretense in Discourse About Motion (or, Why the Sun Really Does Rise).Brendan Jackson - 2007 - Noûs 41 (2):298–317.
    These days it is widely agreed that there is no such thing as absolute motion and rest; the motion of an object can only be characterized with respect to some chosen frame of reference.1 This is a fact of which many of us are well-aware, and yet a cursory consideration of the ways we ascribe motion to objects gives the impression that it is a fact we persistently ignore. We insist to the police officer that we came to a full (...)
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  45. Nativism and the Evolutionary Debunking of Morality.Brendan Cline - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (2):231-253.
    Evolutionary debunking arguments purport to undercut the justification of our moral judgments by showing why a tendency to make moral judgments would evolve regardless of the truth of those judgments. Machery and Mallon (2010. Evolution of morality. In J.M. Doris and The Moral Psychology Research Group (Eds.), The Moral Psychology Handbook (pp. 3-46). Oxford: Oxford University Press) have recently tried to disarm these arguments by showing that moral cognition – in the sense that is relevant to debunking – is not (...)
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  46.  56
    Philosophy in Classical India: The Proper Work of Reason.Brendan S. Gillon - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):707-711.
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  47.  46
    What Does Displacement Explain, and What Do Congruence Effects Show?: A Response to Hofweber.Brendan Balcerak Jackson - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (3):269-274.
    This is a brief response to Thomas Hofweber's "Extraction, Displacement and Focus: A Reply to Balcerak Jackson" (Linguistics and Philosophy 37.3 (2014)), which was a reply to my "Defusing Easy Arguments for Numbers" (Linguistics and Philosophy 36.6 (2013)).
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  48. Moral Explanations, Thick and Thin.Brendan Cline - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-20.
    Cornell realists maintain that irreducible moral properties have earned a place in our ontology in virtue of the indispensable role they play in a variety of explanations. These explanations can be divided into two groups: those that employ thin ethical concepts and those that employ thick ethical concepts. Recent work on thick concepts suggests that they are not inherently evaluative in their meaning. If correct, this creates problems for the moral explanations of Cornell realists, since the most persuasive moral explanations (...)
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  49. Mathematical Cultures: The London Meetings 2012-2014.Brendan Larvor (ed.) - 2016 - Springer International Publishing.
    This collection presents significant contributions from an international network project on mathematical cultures, including essays from leading scholars in the history and philosophy of mathematics and mathematics education.​ Mathematics has universal standards of validity. Nevertheless, there are local styles in mathematical research and teaching, and great variation in the place of mathematics in the larger cultures that mathematical practitioners belong to. The reflections on mathematical cultures collected in this book are of interest to mathematicians, philosophers, historians, sociologists, cognitive scientists and (...)
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  50.  24
    Can Self-Forming Actions Dispel Worries About Luck?Brendan Murday - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):1313-1330.
    Libertarian theories of freedom and responsibility face a worry about luck: if an action is undetermined, the action cannot be legitimately attributed to the agent; instead the action is a matter of luck, and so the agent is not responsible for the action. Robert Kane defends libertarianism by appealing to self-forming actions. These actions are undetermined because the agent is attempting to act on two conflicting motives, but the agent is responsible for the outcome if she is responsible for having (...)
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