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  1. Individuality, pluralism, and the phylogenetic species concept.Brent D. Mishler & Robert N. Brandon - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):397-414.
    The concept of individuality as applied to species, an important advance in the philosophy of evolutionary biology, is nevertheless in need of refinement. Four important subparts of this concept must be recognized: spatial boundaries, temporal boundaries, integration, and cohesion. Not all species necessarily meet all of these. Two very different types of pluralism have been advocated with respect to species, only one of which is satisfactory. An often unrecognized distinction between grouping and ranking components of any species concept is necessary. (...)
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  2.  44
    Species Concepts: A Case for Pluralism.Brent D. Mishler & M. J. Donoghue - 1982 - Systematic Zoology 31:491-503.
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  3. Getting Rid of Species?Brent D. Mishler - 1999 - In Robert A. Wilson (ed.), Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays. MIT Press. pp. 307-315.
     
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  4. The Hunting of the SNaRC: A Snarky Solution to the Species Problem.Brent D. Mishler & John S. Wilkins - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (1).
    We argue that the logical outcome of the cladistics revolution in biological systematics, and the move towards rankless phylogenetic classification of nested monophyletic groups as formalized in the PhyloCode, is to eliminate the species rank along with all the others and simply name clades. We propose that the lowest level of formally named clade be the SNaRC, the Smallest Named and Registered Clade. The SNaRC is an epistemic level in the classification, not an ontic one. Naming stops at that level (...)
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  5.  31
    Species are not uniquely real biological entities.Brent D. Mishler - 2009 - In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 110--122.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Historical and Current Views of Species Return to a Darwinian View of Species Practical Implications Postscript: Counterpoint References.
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  6.  92
    Sober on Brandon on screening-off and the levels of selection.Robert N. Brandon, Janis Antonovics, Richard Burian, Scott Carson, Greg Cooper, Paul Sheldon Davies, Christopher Horvath, Brent D. Mishler, Robert C. Richardson, Kelly Smith & Peter Thrall - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (3):475-486.
    Sober (1992) has recently evaluated Brandon's (1982, 1990; see also 1985, 1988) use of Salmon's (1971) concept of screening-off in the philosophy of biology. He critiques three particular issues, each of which will be considered in this discussion.
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  7.  31
    The Delimitation of Phylogenetic Characters.Eric S. J. Harris & Brent D. Mishler - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):230-234.
  8. Phylogenetic Analogies in the Conceptual Development of Science.Brent D. Mishler - 1990 - PSA Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990 (2):224-235.
    David Hull’s approach to science, which culminated in his important book Science as a Process(1988), represents an unprecedented conjunction of philosophy of science with the results and concepts of a particular science. Hull takes an evolutionary approach to the conceptual development of science, importing much of his explanatory framework from comparative biology, the discipline where his empirical observations of scientists have been made. On the surface, such a cozy relationship between data, theory, and metatheory leads to worries about circular reasoning (...)
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    Sex and the individuality of species: A response to Ghiselin. [REVIEW]Brent D. Mishler & Robert N. Brandon - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (1):77-79.
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    Phylogenetic Analogies in the Conceptual Development of Science.Brent D. Mishler - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:225-235.
    I address David Hull's theses about the process of science from the perspective of an evolutionary biologist, particularly emphasizing phylogenetic systematics, an area that has figured prominently in Hull's work as a source of both sociological data and metatheory. The goal is to carefully explore analogies and disanalogies between scientific process and comparative biology. There do seem to be remarkable analogies, indeed these lead to important insights that might not otherwise have been made, yet some possible analogies present novel problems: (...)
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  11.  6
    A Response to Ghiselin.Brent D. Mishler - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (1):77.
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