11 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Brent M. Kious [9]Brent Michael Kious [2]
See also
Brent Kious
University of Utah
  1.  11
    Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry: A Moral Crisis?Margaret Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):29-39.
    Involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid-in-dying in terminal illness combine to create a moral dilemma. If PAD in terminal illness is permissible, it should also be permissible for some who suffer from nonterminal psychiatric illness: suffering provides much of the justification for PAD, and the suffering in mental illness can be as severe as in physical illness. But involuntary psychiatric commitment to prevent suicide suggests that the suffering of persons with mental illness does not justify ending their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2. Diseases, Patients and the Epistemology of Practice: Mapping the Borders of Health, Medicine and Care.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Benjamin R. Lewis & Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):357-364.
  3.  10
    Boorse’s Theory of Disease: Do Values Matter?Brent M. Kious - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (4):421-438.
    There has been much debate about whether the concept of disease articulated in Boorse’s biostatistical theory is value-neutral or value-laden. Here, I want to examine whether this debate matters. I suggest that there are two basic respects in which value-ladenness might be important: it could threaten either scientific legitimacy or moral permissibility. I argue that value-ladenness does not threaten the scientific legitimacy of our disease-concept because the concept makes little difference to the formulation and testing of scientific hypotheses. Likewise, even (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Philosophy on Steroids: Why the Anti-Doping Position Could Use a Little Enhancement.Brent M. Kious - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (4):213-234.
    There is currently much concern over the use of pharmaceuticals and other biomedical techniques to enhance athletic performance—a practice we might refer to as doping. Many justifications of anti-doping efforts claim that doping involves a serious moral transgression. In this article, I review a number of arguments in support of that claim, but show that they are not conclusive, suggesting that we do not have good reasons for thinking that doping is wrong.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5.  50
    Dispelling a Few False-Positives: A Reply to MacGregor and McNamee on Doping.Brent Michael Kious - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):195-200.
    McGregor and MacNamee recently, in this journal, offered several criticisms of an earlier article in which I attempted to refute a number of arguments for the claim that doping in sports is morally wrong. Their criticisms are numerous, but focus on four domains. First, they sketch a view on which the risk profiles of different sports may make doping permissible in some and impermissible in others. Second, they suggest that my criticisms of safety-based arguments assume that doping opponents are bent (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  12
    Respect for Autonomy: Deciding What is Good for Oneself.Brent Michael Kious - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):769-775.
    Paternalistic interference in autonomous decisions is typically impermissible. This has several explanations, among which is a view I call the agent-constitution of the good: that the autonomous agent not only knows what is best for herself, but determines what is best for herself through her desires, goals and so on. For instance, it might seem that if an autonomous person does choose not to take insulin for her diabetes, then not only is it inappropriate to force treatment upon her, it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  25
    Autonomy and Values: Why the Conventional Theory of Autonomy is Not Value-Neutral.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (1):1-12.
    One of the most widely accepted views in bioethics is that paternalistic interference in others’ self-regarding decisions is justified only if those decisions are not autonomous. Typically, a decision is autonomous if and only if it satisfies certain psychological criteria. Namely, it must be competent and also voluntary. This latter criterion means, roughly, that the agent herself decided without being controlled or unduly influenced by other persons or impersonal forces, in light her own values.The modern locus classicus of this idea (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  23
    Internal Control and Inappropriate Desires.Brent M. Kious - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):21-22.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 21-22, August 2011.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  46
    Response to MacGregor and McNamee: Risks, Relativity, and Wrongness.Brent M. Kious - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):209-210.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  4
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry”.Margaret Pabst Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):W14-W17.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page W14-W17.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  9
    Autonomy, Judgment, and Theories of the Good.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (1):21-24.
    I am grateful for the insightful comments that have been furnished by Drs. Gala, Moseley, and Perring following their reading of my paper. Happily, I find myself in the position of being able to accept many of their criticisms, which identify many of the limitations of my argument as I see them. In only a few cases do I feel that their remarks are misplaced.The first concern raised by Moseley and Gala is that the paper gives the regrettable impression that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark