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Brent M. Kious [19]Brent Michael Kious [4]
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Brent Kious
University of Utah
  1.  40
    Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry: A Moral Crisis?Margaret Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):29-39.
    Involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid-in-dying (PAD) in terminal illness combine to create a moral dilemma. If PAD in terminal illness is permissible, it should also be permissible for some who suffer from nonterminal psychiatric illness: suffering provides much of the justification for PAD, and the suffering in mental illness can be as severe as in physical illness. But involuntary psychiatric commitment to prevent suicide suggests that the suffering of persons with mental illness does not justify ending (...)
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  2.  16
    What Do Psychiatrists Think About Caring for Patients Who Have Extremely Treatment-Refractory Illness?Natalie J. Dorfman, Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby, Peter A. Ubel, Bryanna Moore, Ryan Nelson & Brent M. Kious - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (1):51-58.
    Questions about when to limit unhelpful treatments are often raised in general medicine but are less commonly considered in psychiatry. Here we describe a survey of U.S. psychiatrists intended to characterize their attitudes about the management of suicidal ideation in patients with severely treatment-refractory illness. Respondents (n = 212) received one of two cases describing a patient with suicidal ideation due to either borderline personality disorder or major depressive disorder. Both patients were described as receiving all guideline-based and plausible emerging (...)
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  3. Diseases, patients and the epistemology of practice: mapping the borders of health, medicine and care.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Benjamin R. Lewis & Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):357-364.
    Last year saw the 20th anniversary edition of JECP, and in the introduction to the philosophy section of that landmark edition, we posed the question: apart from ethics, what is the role of philosophy ‘at the bedside’? The purpose of this question was not to downplay the significance of ethics to clinical practice. Rather, we raised it as part of a broader argument to the effect that ethical questions – about what we should do in any given situation – are (...)
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  4.  24
    Ending One's Life.Margaret Pabst Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):37-47.
    If you developed Alzheimer disease, would you want to go all the way to the end of what might be a decade‐long course? Some would; some wouldn't. Options open to those who choose to die sooner are often inadequate. Do‐not‐resuscitate orders and advance directives depend on others' cooperation. Preemptive suicide may mean giving up years of life one would count as good. Do‐it‐yourself methods can fail. What we now ask of family and clinicians caring for persons with dementia, and of (...)
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  5. Philosophy on steroids: Why the anti-doping position could use a little enhancement.Brent M. Kious - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (4):213-234.
    There is currently much concern over the use of pharmaceuticals and other biomedical techniques to enhance athletic performance—a practice we might refer to as doping. Many justifications of anti-doping efforts claim that doping involves a serious moral transgression. In this article, I review a number of arguments in support of that claim, but show that they are not conclusive, suggesting that we do not have good reasons for thinking that doping is wrong.
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  6.  18
    Suffering and the Completed Life.Margaret Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):62-64.
    In his carefully documented article, “From reciprocity to autonomy in physician-assisted death: an ethical analysis of the Dutch Supreme Court ruling in the Albert Heringa case,” Berand Florijn (20...
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  7.  17
    Three kinds of suffering and their relative moral significance.Brent M. Kious - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):621-627.
    Suffering is widely assumed to have particular moral significance, and is of special relevance in medicine. There are, however, many theories about the nature of suffering that seem mutually incompatible. I suggest that there are three overall kinds of view about what suffering is: value‐based theories, including the theory famously expounded by Eric Cassell, which as a group suggest that suffering is something like a state of distress related to threats to things that a person cares about; feeling‐based theories, which (...)
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  8.  27
    Boorse’s Theory of Disease: (Why) Do Values Matter?Brent M. Kious - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (4):421-438.
    There has been much debate about whether the concept of disease articulated in Boorse’s biostatistical theory is value-neutral or value-laden. Here, I want to examine whether this debate matters. I suggest that there are two basic respects in which value-ladenness might be important: it could threaten either scientific legitimacy or moral permissibility. I argue that value-ladenness does not threaten the scientific legitimacy of our disease-concept because the concept makes little difference to the formulation and testing of scientific hypotheses. Likewise, even (...)
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  9.  15
    Look for injustice and you’ll probably find it: a commentary on Harcourt’s ‘epistemic injustice, children and mental illness’.Brent Michael Kious - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (11):736-737.
    In ‘Epistemic injustice, children and mental Illness,’1 Edward Harcourt uses Miranda Fricker’s concept of testimonial injustice 2 to make sense of claims, from mental health service users, that clinicians do not listen to them. Being listened to matters. It is a sign of respect as a person and associated with better clinical outcomes. TI involves suffering an unfair credibility deficit because of prejudice, so seems like a promising way of understanding service users’ complaints. Harcourt quickly concludes, however, that it is (...)
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  10.  32
    Autonomy and Values: Why the Conventional Theory of Autonomy is Not Value-Neutral.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (1):1-12.
    One of the most widely accepted views in bioethics is that paternalistic interference in others’ self-regarding decisions is justified only if those decisions are not autonomous. Typically, a decision is autonomous if and only if it satisfies certain psychological criteria. Namely, it must be competent and also voluntary. This latter criterion means, roughly, that the agent herself decided without being controlled or unduly influenced by other persons or impersonal forces, in light her own values.The modern locus classicus of this idea (...)
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  11.  7
    Are Psychedelic Experiences Transformative? Can We Consent to Them?Brent M. Kious, Andrew Peterson & Amy L. McGuire - 2024 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 67 (1):143-154.
    ABSTRACT:Psychedelic substances have great promise for the treatment of many conditions, and they are the subject of intensive research. As with other medical treatments, both research and clinical use of psychedelics depend on our ability to ensure informed consent by patients and research participants. However, some have argued that informed consent for psychedelic use may be impossible, because psychedelic experiences can be transformative in the sense articulated by L. A. Paul (2014). For Paul, transformative experiences involve either the acquisition of (...)
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  12.  9
    Hard Choices: How Does Injustice Affect the Ethics of Medical Aid in Dying?Brent M. Kious - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-12.
    Critics of medical aid in dying (MAID) often argue that it is impermissible because background social conditions are insufficiently good for some persons who would utilize it. I provide a critical evaluation of this view. I suggest that receiving MAID is a sort of “hard choice,” in that death is prima facie bad for the individual and only promotes that person’s interests in special circumstances. Those raising this objection to MAID are, I argue, concerned primarily about the effects of injustice (...)
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  13.  53
    Dispelling a few false-positives: A reply to MacGregor and McNamee on doping.Brent Michael Kious - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):195-200.
    McGregor and MacNamee recently, in this journal, offered several criticisms of an earlier article in which I attempted to refute a number of arguments for the claim that doping in sports is morally wrong. Their criticisms are numerous, but focus on four domains. First, they sketch a view on which the risk profiles of different sports may make doping permissible in some and impermissible in others. Second, they suggest that my criticisms of safety-based arguments assume that doping opponents are bent (...)
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  14.  12
    A Focus Group Study of the Views of Persons with a History of Psychiatric Illness about Psychiatric Medical Aid in Dying.Brent M. Kious & Margaret Pabst Battin - 2024 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 15 (1):1-10.
    Background Medical aid in dying (MAID) is legal in a number of countries, including some states in the U.S. While MAID is only permitted for terminal illnesses in the U.S., some other countries allow it for persons with psychiatric illness. Psychiatric MAID, however, raises unique ethical concerns, especially related to its effects on mental illness stigma and on how persons with psychiatric illnesses would come to feel about treatment and suicide. To explore those concerns, we conducted several focus groups with (...)
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  15.  22
    Respect for autonomy: deciding what is good for oneself.Brent Michael Kious - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):769-775.
    Paternalistic interference in autonomous decisions is typically impermissible. This has several explanations, among which is a view I call theagent-constitution of the good: that the autonomous agent not onlyknowswhat is best for herself, butdetermineswhat is best for herself through her desires, goals and so on (heraims). For instance, it might seem that if an autonomous person does choose not to take insulin for her diabetes, then not only is it inappropriate to force treatment upon her, it is also not in (...)
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  16.  2
    Moral Distress and Involuntary COVID-19 Vaccination of a Mature Minor Receiving Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment.Philip L. Baese, Toni Hesse & Brent M. Kious - 2022 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 33 (3):236-239.
    Mandatory vaccination against COVID-19 is a highly controversial issue, and many members of the public oppose it on the grounds that they should be free to determine what happens to their own body. Opinion has generally favored parental authority with respect to vaccination of children, but less attention has been paid to the ethical complexities of how to respond when mature minors refuse vaccination that is requested by their parents. We present a case in which a mature minor, who was (...)
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  17.  12
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry”.Margaret Pabst Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):W14-W17.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page W14-W17.
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  18.  17
    Autonomy, Judgment, and Theories of the Good.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (1):21-24.
    I am grateful for the insightful comments that have been furnished by Drs. Gala, Moseley, and Perring following their reading of my paper. Happily, I find myself in the position of being able to accept many of their criticisms, which identify many of the limitations of my argument as I see them. In only a few cases do I feel that their remarks are misplaced.The first concern raised by Moseley and Gala is that the paper gives the regrettable impression that (...)
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  19.  10
    Evidence for Doubting the Evidence?Brent M. Kious - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (2):129-131.
    Clinical research is difficult. It confronts massive heterogeneity in its participants, who are real people bumping around the world in complex ways. Clinical research in psychology is doubly difficult, since it tries systematically to study conditions that are inherently difficult to systematize. In their thoughtful and closely argued article, Truijens et al. emphasize these difficulties, and describe a novel challenge to psychotherapy research: that the support for many evidence-based therapies is weaker than previously recognized because it relies on patient-reported outcome (...)
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  20.  26
    Internal Control and Inappropriate Desires.Brent M. Kious - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):21-22.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 21-22, August 2011.
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  21.  20
    Problems with psychiatry, and problems with thinking about psychiatry: Steeves Demazeux and Patrick Singy: The DSM-5 in perspective: Philosophical reflections on the psychiatric babel. New York and London: Springer, 2015, xxiv+238pp. $129.00 HB.Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Metascience 25 (1):91-94.
  22.  51
    Response to MacGregor and McNamee: Risks, relativity, and wrongness.Brent M. Kious - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):209-210.
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  23.  6
    Suffering and the dilemmas of pediatric care: a response to Tyler Tate.Brent Michael Kious - 2023 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 44 (3):249-258.
    In a recent article, Tyler Tate argues that the suffering of children — especially children with severe cognitive impairments — should be regarded as the antithesis of flourishing, where flourishing is relative to one’s individual characteristics and essentially involves receiving care from others. Although initially persuasive, Tate’s theory is ambiguous in several ways, leading to significant conceptual problems. By identifying flourishing with receiving care, Tate raises questions about the importance of care that he does not address, giving rise to a (...)
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