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  1.  25
    Heidegger and the Will: On the Way to Gelassenheit.Bret W. Davis - 2007 - Northwestern University Press.
    The problem of the will has long been viewed as central to Heidegger's later thought. In the first book to focus on this problem, Bret W. Davis clarifies key issues from the philosopher's later period--particularly his critique of the culmination of the history of metaphysics in the technological "will to will" and the possibility of Gelassenheit or "releasement" from this willful way of being in the world--but also shows that the question of will is at the very heart of Heidegger's (...)
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  2.  3
    A Philosopher Frog Leaps Out of the Western Well.Bret W. Davis - 2019 - Research in Phenomenology 49 (1):126-134.
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  3. Martin Heidegger.Bret W. Davis - 2009 - Acumen Publishing.
    Addresses and clarifies Heidegger's basic concepts for the uninitiated.
     
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  4.  18
    Returning the World to Nature: Heidegger’s Turn From a Transcendental-Horizonal Projection of World to an Indwelling Releasement to the Open-Region.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):373-397.
    The central issue of Heidegger’s thought is the question of being. More precisely, it is the question of the relation between being and human being, the relation, that is, between Sein and Dasein. This article addresses the so-called turn in Heidegger’s thinking of this relation. In particular, it shows how this turn entails a shift from a transcendental-horizonal projection of world to “an indwelling releasement [inständige Gelassenheit] to the worlding of the world”. Although a wide range of pre- and post-turn (...)
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  5.  5
    Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis, Brian Schroeder & Jason M. Wirth (eds.) - 2011 - Indiana University Press.
    Set in the context of global philosophy, this volume offers critical, innovative, and productive dialogue between some of the most influential philosophical figures from East and West.
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  6. Heidegger and Asian Philosophy.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 459.
     
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  7. Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts.Bret W. Davis - 2009 - Routledge.
    Heidegger's writings are among the most formidable in recent philosophy. The pivotal concepts of his thought are for many the source of both fascination and frustration. Yet any student of philosophy needs to become acquainted with Heidegger's thought. "Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts" is designed to facilitate this. Each chapter introduces and explains a key Heideggerian concept, or a cluster of closely related concepts. Together, the chapters cover the full range of Heidegger's thought in its early, middle, and later phases.
     
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  8.  87
    Zen After Zarathustra: The Problem of the Will in the Confrontation Between Nietzsche and Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):89-138.
  9.  24
    The Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10.  8
    Gadfly of Continental Philosophy: On Robert Bernasconi’s Critique of Philosophical Eurocentrism.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):119-129.
    This article examines the critique of philosophical Eurocentrism developed over the past two-and-a-half decades by Robert Bernasconi. The restriction of the moniker “philosophy” to the Western tradition, and the exclusion of non-Western traditions from the field, became the standard view only after the late eighteenth century. Bernasconi critically analyzes this restriction and exclusion and makes a compelling case for its philosophical illegitimacy. After showing how Bernasconi convincingly repudiates the identification of philosophy with Europe – asserted most explicitly by Continental philosophers (...)
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  11.  6
    Dislodging Eurocentrism and Racism From Philosophy.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):115-118.
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  12.  14
    Sharing Words of Silence: Panikkar After Gadamer.Bret W. Davis - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):52-68.
    This article elucidates and interpretively develops Raimon Panikkar's hermeneutics of intertraditional dialogue by way of setting it into sympathetic and critical dialogue with the predominantly intratraditional hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It argues that Panikkar's thought enables us not only to appreciate, but also to question the limits of the fundamental roles played by language and tradition in Gadamer's hermeneutics. Panikkar's own hermeneutical reflections arise directly out of intertraditional as well as interlinguistic experience; and they ultimately direct us toward the profoundest (...)
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  13.  13
    Otherwise Than the Will: Davis' Faithful Transgression of Heidegger.Bret W. Davis & Jason M. Wirth - 2009 - Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):135-142.
  14.  8
    Opening Up the West.Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):57-83.
    This essay aims to help prepare the way for those trained in Western philosophy to enter into dialogue with non-Western traditions of phi­losophy such as that of Japan. This will be done mainly by means of critical examination of some key instances of the ambivalence—the tension between the openings and closures—toward dialogue with non-Western traditions found throughout the history of Western phi­losophy. After tracing this ambivalence back to the Greeks, and to the figure of Socrates in particular, the essay focuses (...)
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  15.  8
    The Significance of Japanese Philosophy.Masakatsu Fujita & Bret W. Davis - 2013 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.
    When I deliver an introductory lecture on Japanese Philosophy, I always raise the following question: Is it appropriate to modify the word philosophy with an adjective such as Japanese? Philosophy is, after all, a discipline that addresses universal problems, and so transcends the restrictions implied in geographical descriptors. However, as Kuki Shūzō argues in his essay “Tokyo and Kyoto,” I think that this is only part, and not the whole truth of the matter.One’s thinking takes place within the framework of (...)
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  16.  12
    Lawlor, Leonard., Early Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (4):874-875.
  17.  15
    Conversing in Emptiness: Rethinking Cross-Cultural Dialogue with the Kyoto School.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:171-194.
    As we attempt to engender a dialogue between different philosophical traditions, one of the first of the topics which need to be addressed is that of the very nature of dialogue. In other words, we need to engage in a dialogue about dialogue. Toward that end, this essay attempts to rethink the nature of dialogue from the perspective of two key members of the Kyoto School, namely its founder, Nishida Kitar1945), and its current central figure, Ueda Shizuteru (b. 1926). The (...)
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  18.  8
    Naturalness in Zen and Shin Buddhism: Before and Beyond Self- and Other-Power.Bret W. Davis - 2014 - Contemporary Buddhism 15 (2):433-447.
    This article seeks to clarify the fundamental similarities and differences between the two most prominent forms of Buddhism in Japan: Zen and Shin Buddhism. While proponents of Zen typically criticize Shin for seeking the Buddha outside the self, rather than as one's ‘true self’ or ‘original face’, proponents of Shin typically criticize Zen for relying of ‘self-power’, which they understand as inevitably a form of ‘ego-power’, rather than entrusting oneself to the ‘Other-power’ of Amida Buddha. Yet Zen and Shin in (...)
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  19.  1
    Heidegger on East-West Dialogue: Anticipating the Event, Lin Ma.Bret W. Davis - 2010 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (3):327-329.
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  20.  5
    Review of Richard Capobianco, Engaging Heidegger[REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (9).
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  21.  1
    The Kyoto School: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Bret W. Davis - 2016 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 2:301-305.
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  22.  9
    Country Path Conversations.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2016 - Indiana University Press.
    First published in German in 1995, volume 77 of Heidegger’s Complete Works consists of three imaginary conversations written as World War II was coming to an end. Composed at a crucial moment in history and in Heidegger's own thinking, these conversations present meditations on science and technology; the devastation of nature, the war, and evil; and the possibility of release from representational thinking into a more authentic relation with being and the world. The first conversation involves a scientist, a scholar, (...)
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  23.  6
    Country Path Conversations.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    First published in German in 1995, volume 77 of Heidegger’s Complete Works consists of three imaginary conversations written as World War II was coming to an end. Composed at a crucial moment in history and in Heidegger's own thinking, these conversations present meditations on science and technology; the devastation of nature, the war, and evil; and the possibility of release from representational thinking into a more authentic relation with being and the world. The first conversation involves a scientist, a scholar, (...)
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  24. Das Innerste Zuäußerst: Nishida Und Die Revolution der Ich-Du-Beziehung.Bret W. Davis - 2011 - Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 36 (3).
    Nishida Kitarō developed a revolutionary account of the I-Thou relation, according to which the true self, in its deepest recesses, is turned inside out so as to be radically open to alterity. He thus offers an original and significant contribution to a countercurrent to the tendency toward solipsistic subjectivity in the history of modern Western philosophy. With his watershed essay ›I and Thou‹ he deserves to be recognized as key figure in the revolutionary movement toward an appreciation of alterity, a (...)
     
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  25. Korak unatrag kroz nihilizam. Radikalna orijentacija filozofije zena Nishitanija Keijija.Bret W. Davis - 2005 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 96 (1):121-139.
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  26. Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru'''s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.). Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 201-220.
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  27. Letting Go of God for Nothing: Ueda Shizuteru’s Non-Mysticism and the Question of Ethics in Zen Buddhism.Bret W. Davis - 2008 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 201-220.
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  28. On the Way to Gelassenheit: The Problem of the Will and the Possibility of Non-Willing in Heidegger's Thought.Bret W. Davis - 2001 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation shows how the problem of the will is at the very heart of Heidegger's thought---not only explicitly in his post-turn critique of the technological "will to will" and in his intimations of Nicht-Wollen or Gelassenheit---but in the twistings and turnings of the development of his thought-path as a whole. ;In Chapter 1, in the course of laying out the interpretive terms of the investigation, I also begin with a consideration of the "debate" between the two great 19th century (...)
     
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  29. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
     
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  30. Provocative Ambivalences in Japanese Philosophy of Religion: With a Focus on Nishida and Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2004 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 306-339.
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  31. Provokativna Podvojenost U Japanskoj Filozofiji Religije: S Fokusom Na Nishidi I Zenu.Bret W. Davis - 2009 - In Nevad Kahteran & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 116-145.
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  32. Toward a Liberative Phenomenology of Zen.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Yearbook for Eastern and Western Philosophy 2017 (2):304-320.
    The questions pursued in this essay are: What can philosophers today learn from a tradition of psychosomatic practice such as Zen Buddhism? How does such a tradition challenge the very methodology of our cerebral practice of philosophy? And finally: What would it mean to bring Western philosophy and the psychosomatic practice of Zen together, not necessarily to merge them into one, but at least to commute between them so that they may speak to and inform one another? In pursuing these (...)
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  33. Toward a World of Worlds: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and the Place of Cross-Cultural Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 184-204.
     
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  34. Toward a World of Worlds: Nishida, The Kyoto School, and the Place of Cross-Cultural Dialogue.Bret W. Davis - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 184-204.
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  35. The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy.Bret W. Davis (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
     
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