Results for 'Brett A. Boyle'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  26
    The Impact of Customer Characteristics and Moral Philosophies on Ethicaljudgments of Salespeople.Brett A. Boyle - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3):249 - 267.
    This study considers customer characteristics as situational influences on a salesperson'sethical judgment formation. Specifically, customer gender, income, and propensity to buy were considered as factors which may bias these judgments. Additionally, the gender of the salesperson and their moral value structure were examined as moderating effects. An experiment using real estate agents reading hypothetical sales scenarios revealed differences across customer gender, customer income, and level of the respondent'sidealism. Significant interactive effects with these factors were also found involving respondent gender and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2.  9
    Points of Reference and Individual Differences as Sources of Bias in Ethical Judgments.Brett A. Boyle, Robert F. Dahlstrom & James J. Kellaris - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):63-71.
    The authors demonstrate that ethical judgments can be biased when previous judgments serve as a point of reference against which a current situation is judged. Scenarios describing ethical or unethical sales practices were used in an experiment to prime subjects who subsequently rated the ethics of an ethically ambiguous target scenario. The target tended to be rated as more ethical by subjects primed with unethical scenarios, and less ethical by subjects primed with ethical scenarios. This "contrast effect," however, is contingent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  36
    Biobanking, Consent, and Certificates of Confidentiality: Does the ANPRM Muddy the Water?Brett A. Williams & Leslie E. Wolf - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):440-453.
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has proposed substantial changes to the current regulatory system governing human subjects research in its Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, entitled “Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing Burden, Delay, and Ambiguity for Investigators.” Some of the most significant proposed changes concern the use of biospecimens in research. Because research involving biological materials begins with an initial interaction with an individual, such research falls squarely within the human subjects (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  7
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Institutional Investment A Content Analysis–Based Portfolio Screening Model for Socially Responsible Mutual Funds.Brett A. Stone - 2001 - Business and Society 40 (1):112-117.
  5.  8
    Strategic Visual Imagery and Automatic Priming Effects in Pop-Out Visual Search.Brett A. Cochrane, Hanzhuang Zhu & Bruce Milliken - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65:59-70.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. II—Matthew Boyle: Transparent Self-Knowledge.Matthew Boyle - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):223-241.
    I distinguish two ways of explaining our capacity for ‘transparent’ knowledge of our own present beliefs, perceptions, and intentions: an inferential and a reflective approach. Alex Byrne (2011) has defended an inferential approach, but I argue that this approach faces a basic difficulty, and that a reflective approach avoids the difficulty. I conclude with a brief sketch and defence of a reflective approach to our transparent self-knowledge, and I show how this approach is connected with the thesis that we must (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  7.  32
    Exploringthe Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Employer Attractiveness.Kristin B. Backhaus, Brett A. Stone & Karl Heiner - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (3):292-318.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   72 citations  
  8. Brett, A.-Liberty, Rights and Nature.P. J. Weithman - 1998 - Philosophical Books 39:241-243.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  10
    Certificates of Confidentiality: Protecting Human Subject Research Data in Law and Practice.Leslie E. Wolf, Mayank J. Patel, Brett A. Williams Tarver, Jeffrey L. Austin, Lauren A. Dame & Laura M. Beskow - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):594-609.
    Answering important public health questions often requires collection of sensitive information about individuals. For example, our understanding of how HIV is transmitted and how to prevent it only came about with people's willingness to share information about their sexual and drug-using behaviors. Given the scientific need for sensitive, personal information, researchers have a corresponding ethical and legal obligation to maintain the confidentiality of data they collect and typically promise in consent forms to restrict access to it and not to publish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  10.  3
    Modern Slavery: A Global Perspective, by Siddharth Kara: New York: Columbia University Press, 2017.Brett A. Berliner - 2019 - Human Rights Review 20 (4):485-487.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Modern Slavery: A Global Perspective, by Siddharth Kara: New York: Columbia University Press, 2017.Brett A. Berliner - 2019 - Human Rights Review 20 (4):485-487.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  8
    Relationships Between Primary Care Physicians and Consultants in Managed Care.A. S. Brett - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (1):60.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  11
    What Diving Animals Might Tell Us About Blood Flow Regulation.Brett A. Gooden & Robert Elsner - 1985 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 28 (3):465-474.
  14.  3
    Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport.T. Rachel Park, Emmanuel Macedo, Brett A. Diaz & Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
    In Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport, Kathryn E. Henne provides ‘a genealogical account of anti-doping regulation by questioning the meanings we take from sport’ (...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  39
    Experimentation, Temptation, and Nietzsche’s Philosopher of the Future.Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):187-201.
    The method of the philosophers of the future that Nietzsche heralds, but does not self-identify with, has not received the attention it deserves in the secondary literature. In this essay, I address this lacuna with an interpretation of the roles of the philosophers of the future that explains in what sense they are and are not tempters. As free spirits, cultural physicians, and legislators, the philosophers of the future undertake experiments to acquire knowledge; hence, the philosophers of the future are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  5
    Corporate-Community Relations.Sandra A. Waddock & Mary-Ellen Boyle - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:621-632.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  10
    On A Philosophical Model of Hegel's Phenomenological Method: A Reply to Kenneth Westphal.Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2008 - Hegel Bulletin 29 (1-2):71-96.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  11
    Studying the Effects of Actual Knowledge of a Firm's Corporate Social Performance on Organizational Reputation and Attractiveness.Kristin B. Backhaus, Brett A. Stone & Karl Heiner - 2001 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 12:97-107.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  32
    Land-Grant Universities and Extension Into the 21st Century: Renegotiating or Abandoning a Social Contract. By George R. McDowell. [REVIEW]Nancy Grudens-Schuck & Brett A. Kramer - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):205-209.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  45
    The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited.Brett Calcott & Kim Sterelny (eds.) - 2011 - MIT Press.
    Drawing on recent advances in evolutionary biology, prominent scholars return to the question posed in a pathbreaking book: how evolution itself evolved.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  21.  42
    Boyle on Science and the Mechanical Philosophy: A Reply to Chalmers.Andrew Pyle - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):171-186.
    Robert Boyle thought that his scientific achievements in pneumatics and chemistry depended on, and thus provided support for, his mechanical philosophy. In a recent article in this journal, Alan Chalmers has challenged this view. This paper consists of a reply to Chalmers on two fronts. First it tries to specify precisely what ‘the mechanical philosophy’ meant for Boyle. Then it goes on to defend, against Chalmers, the view that Boyle's science does support his natural philosophy.Keywords: Robert (...); Mechanical philosophy; Reductionism. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  22.  37
    On the Apodictic Proof and Validation of Kant's Revolutionary Hypothesis.Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2010 - Kantian Review 15 (1):37-56.
    The second edition of the Critique of Pure Reason contains several major and myriad minor emendations. The revision of the mode of presentation is apparent in four sections of the Critique: the Aesthetic; the Doctrine of the Concepts of the Understanding; the Principles of Pure Understanding; and ‘the paralogisms advanced against rational psychology’ . A new refutation of psychological idealism begins at B274. Perhaps most importantly, a new Preface frames the Critique.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  13
    Angus Nicholls and Martin Liebscher, Eds. Thinking the Unconscious: Nineteenth-Century German Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. 344. $99.00. [REVIEW]Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):166-169.
  24.  6
    Bacon’s Illuminating Experiments and Kant’s Experiment of Pure Reason.Brett A. Fulkerson-Smith - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 455-466.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  2
    Evolutionary Antecedents of Abnormal Personality.Ivor Jones & Brett A. Daniels - 1996 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 40 (1):118.
  26.  9
    Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Catalogue of Greek Coins. [REVIEW]J. M. F. May & A. B. Brett - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):354-354.
  27. The Excellencies of Robert Boyle.Robert Boyle - 2008 - Broadview Press.
    Robert Boyle, one of the most important intellectuals of the seventeenth century, was a gifted experimenter, an exceptionally able philosopher, and a dedicated Christian. In Boyle's two Excellencies, The Excellency of Theology Compared with Natural Philosophy and About The Excellency and Grounds of the Mechanical Hypothesis, he explains and justifies his new philosophy of science while reconciling it with Christian theology. These pioneering works of early science and theology are now available in a modernized and accessible new edition. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  25
    Precarity as a Political Concept, or, Fordism as Exception.Brett Neilson & Ned Rossiter - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):51-72.
    In 2003, the concept of precarity emerged as the central organizing platform for a series of social struggles that would spread across the space of Europe. Four years later, almost as suddenly as the precarity movement appeared, so it would enter into crisis. To understand precarity as a political concept it is necessary to go beyond economistic approaches that see social conditions as determined by the mode of production. Such a move requires us to see Fordism as exception and precarity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29.  41
    Open Questions and Epistemic Necessity.Brett Sherman - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (273):819-840.
    Why can I not appropriately utter ‘It must be raining’ while standing outside in the rain, even though every world consistent with my knowledge is one in which it is raining? The common response to this problem is to hold that epistemic must, in addition to quantifying over epistemic possibilities, carries some additional evidential information concerning the source of one'S evidence. I argue that this is a mistake: epistemic modals are mere quantifiers over epistemic possibilities. My central claim is that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Knowledge and Assumptions.Brett Sherman & Gilbert Harman - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 156 (1):131-140.
    When epistemologists talk about knowledge, the discussions traditionally include only a small class of other epistemic notions: belief, justification, probability, truth. In this paper, we propose that epistemologists should include an additional epistemic notion into the mix, namely the notion of assuming or taking for granted.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  31. Additive Theories of Rationality: A Critique.Matthew Boyle - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):527-555.
    Additive theories of rationality, as I use the term, are theories that hold that an account of our capacity to reflect on perceptually-given reasons for belief and desire-based reasons for action can begin with an account of what it is to perceive and desire, in terms that do not presuppose any connection to the capacity to reflect on reasons, and then can add an account of the capacity for rational reflection, conceived as an independent capacity to ‘monitor’ and ‘regulate’ our (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  32. Re-Engineering Humanity.Brett Frischmann & Evan Selinger - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Every day, new warnings emerge about artificial intelligence rebelling against us. All the while, a more immediate dilemma flies under the radar. Have forces been unleashed that are thrusting humanity down an ill-advised path, one that's increasingly making us behave like simple machines? In this wide-reaching, interdisciplinary book, Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger examine what's happening to our lives as society embraces big data, predictive analytics, and smart environments. They explain how the goal of designing programmable worlds goes hand (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Lineage Explanations: Explaining How Biological Mechanisms Change: Articles.Brett Calcott - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (1):51-78.
    This paper describes a pattern of explanation prevalent in the biological sciences that I call a ‘lineage explanation’. The aim of these explanations is to make plausible certain trajectories of change through phenotypic space. They do this by laying out a series of stages, where each stage shows how some mechanism worked, and the differences between each adjacent stage demonstrates how one mechanism, through minor modifications, could be changed into another. These explanations are important, for though it is widely accepted (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  34. Coin Flips, Credences and the Reflection Principle.Brett Topey - 2012 - Analysis 72 (3):478-488.
    One recent topic of debate in Bayesian epistemology has been the question of whether imprecise credences can be rational. I argue that one account of imprecise credences, the orthodox treatment as defended by James M. Joyce, is untenable. Despite Joyce’s claims to the contrary, a puzzle introduced by Roger White shows that the orthodox account, when paired with Bas C. van Fraassen’s Reflection Principle, can lead to inconsistent beliefs. Proponents of imprecise credences, then, must either provide a compelling reason to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35. Spiritus Vitalis. Studio sulle teorie fisiologiche da Fernel a Boyle.Antonio Clericuzio - 1988 - Nouvelles de la République des Lettres 2:33-84.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  20
    Signals That Make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Arnaud Pocheville & Paul Griffiths - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (1):233-258.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks—from the way monkeys in a troop communicate to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this article, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and his formal measure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Wimsatt and the Robustness Family: Review of Wimsatt’s Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings. [REVIEW]Brett Calcott - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):281-293.
    This review of Wimsatt’s book Re-engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings focuses on analysing his use of robustness, a central theme in the book. I outline a family of three distinct conceptions of robustness that appear in the book, and look at the different roles they play. I briefly examine what underwrites robustness, and suggest that further work is needed to clarify both the structure of robustness and the relation between it various conceptions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  38.  30
    A Redefinition of Boyle's Chemistry and Corpuscular Philosophy.Antonio Clericuzio - 1990 - Annals of Science 47 (6):561-589.
    Summary Robert Boyle did not subordinate chemistry to mechanical philosophy. He was in fact reluctant to explain chemical phenomena by having recourse to the mechanical properties of particles. For him chemistry provided a primary way of penetrating into nature. In his chemical works he employed corpuscles endowed with chemical properties as his explanans. Boyle's chemistry was corpuscular, rather than mechanical. As Boyle's views of seminal principles show, his corpuscular philosophy cannot be described as a purely mechanical theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  39. 'Making Up Your Mind' and the Activity of Reason.Matthew Boyle - 2011 - Philosophers' Imprint 11.
    A venerable philosophical tradition holds that we rational creatures are distinguished by our capacity for a special sort of mental agency or self-determination: we can “make up” our minds about whether to accept a given proposition. But what sort of activity is this? Many contemporary philosophers accept a Process Theory of this activity, according to which a rational subject exercises her capacity for doxastic self-determination only on certain discrete occasions, when she goes through a process of consciously deliberating about whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  40.  13
    The Impact of Moral Intensity and Desire for Control on Scaling Decisions in Social Entrepreneurship.Brett R. Smith, Geoffrey M. Kistruck & Benedetto Cannatelli - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):677-689.
    While research has focused on why certain entrepreneurs elect to create innovative solutions to social problems, very little is known about why some social entrepreneurs choose to scale their solutions while others do not. Research on scaling has generally focused on organizational characteristics often overlooking factors at the individual level that may affect scaling decisions. Drawing on the multidimensional construct of moral intensity, we propose a theoretical model of ethical decision making to explain why a social entrepreneur’s perception of moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. Two Kinds of Self‐Knowledge.Matthew Boyle - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):133-164.
    I argue that a variety of influential accounts of self-knowledge are flawed by the assumption that all immediate, authoritative knowledge of our own present mental states is of one basic kind. I claim, on the contrary, that a satisfactory account of self-knowledge must recognize at least two fundamentally different kinds of self-knowledge: an active kind through which we know our own judgments, and a passive kind through which we know our sensations. I show that the former kind of self-knowledge is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  42.  55
    Onto-Ethologies: The Animal Environments of Uexküll, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Deleuze.Brett Buchanan - 2008 - State University of New York Press.
    Jakob von Uexküll's theories of life -- Biography and historical background -- Nature's conformity with plan -- Umweltforschung -- Biosemiotics -- Concluding remarks -- Marking a path into the environments of animals -- The essential approach to the organism -- Heidegger and the biologists -- Paths to the world -- Disruptive behavior : Heidegger and the captivated animal -- The worldless stone -- The poor animal -- For example, three bees and a lark -- Animal morphology -- A shocking wealth (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  43.  39
    Causal Specificity and the Instructive–Permissive Distinction.Brett Calcott - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (4):481-505.
    I use some recent formal work on measuring causation to explore a suggestion by James Woodward: that the notion of causal specificity can clarify the distinction in biology between permissive and instructive causes. This distinction arises when a complex developmental process, such as the formation of an entire body part, can be triggered by a simple switch, such as the presence of particular protein. In such cases, the protein is said to merely induce or "permit" the developmental process, whilst the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  44.  43
    Culture Shapes Whether the Pursuit of Happiness Predicts Higher or Lower Well-Being.Brett Q. Ford, Julia O. Dmitrieva, Daniel Heller, Yulia Chentsova-Dutton, Igor Grossmann, Maya Tamir, Yukiko Uchida, Birgit Koopmann-Holm, Victoria A. Floerke, Meike Uhrig, Tatiana Bokhan & Iris B. Mauss - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (6):1053-1062.
  45.  36
    A History of Psychology.George Sidney Brett - 1912 - Thoemmes Press.
    'the whole work is remarkably fresh, vivid and attractively written psychologists will be grateful that a work of this kind has been done ... by one who has the scholarship, science, and philosophical training that are requisite for the task' - Mind This renowned three-volume collection records chronologically the steps by which psychology developed from the time of the early Greek thinkers and the first writings on the nature of the mind, through to the 1920s and such modern preoccupations as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46. Signals That Make a Difference.Brett Calcott, Paul E. Griffiths & Arnaud Pocheville - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx022.
    Recent work by Brian Skyrms offers a very general way to think about how information flows and evolves in biological networks — from the way monkeys in a troop communicate, to the way cells in a body coordinate their actions. A central feature of his account is a way to formally measure the quantity of information contained in the signals in these networks. In this paper, we argue there is a tension between how Skyrms talks of signalling networks and his (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  65
    Why How and Why Aren’T Enough: More Problems with Mayr’s Proximate-Ultimate Distinction.Brett Calcott - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):767-780.
    Like Laland et al., I think Mayr’s distinction is problematic, but I identify a further problem with it. I argue that Mayr’s distinction is a false dichotomy, and obscures an important question about evolutionary change. I show how this question, once revealed, sheds light on some debates in evo-devo that Laland et al.’s analysis cannot, and suggest that it provides a different view about how future integration between biological disciplines might proceed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  48.  43
    Engineering and Evolvability.Brett Calcott - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (3):293-313.
    Comparing engineering to evolution typically involves adaptationist thinking, where well-designed artifacts are likened to well-adapted organisms, and the process of evolution is likened to the process of design. A quite different comparison is made when biologists focus on evolvability instead of adaptationism. Here, the idea is that complex integrated systems, whether evolved or engineered, share universal principles that affect the way they change over time. This shift from adaptationism to evolvability is a significant move for, as I argue, we can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  49.  28
    Engineering and Biology: Counsel for a Continued Relationship.Brett Calcott, Arnon Levy, Mark L. Siegal, Orkun S. Soyer & Andreas Wagner - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (1):50-59.
    Biologists frequently draw on ideas and terminology from engineering. Evolutionary systems biology—with its circuits, switches, and signal processing—is no exception. In parallel with the frequent links drawn between biology and engineering, there is ongoing criticism against this cross-fertilization, using the argument that over-simplistic metaphors from engineering are likely to mislead us as engineering is fundamentally different from biology. In this article, we clarify and reconfigure the link between biology and engineering, presenting it in a more favorable light. We do so (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50. Active Belief.Matthew Boyle - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):119-147.
    I argue that cognitively mature human beings have an important sort of control or discretion over their own beliefs, but that to make good sense of this control, we must reject the common idea that it consists in a capacity to act on our belief-state by forming new beliefs or modifying ones we already hold. I propose that we exercise agential control over our beliefs, not primarily in doing things to alter our belief-state, but in holding whatever beliefs we hold. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000