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  1.  63
    Ordinary Meaning and Ordinary People.Kevin Tobia, Brian G. Slocum & Victoria Frances Nourse - 2023 - University of Pennsylvania Law Review 171.
    Perhaps the most fundamental principle of legal interpretation is the presumption that terms should be given their “ordinary” (i.e., general, non-technical) meanings. This principle is a central tenet of modern textualism. Textualists believe a universal presumption of ordinary meaning follows from their theory’s core commitment: A law should be interpreted consistently with what its text communicates to the ordinary public. This Article begins from this textualist premise, empirically examining what legal texts communicate to the public. Five original empirical studies (N (...)
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  2.  13
    Conversational Implicatures and Legal Texts.Brian G. Slocum - 2016 - Ratio Juris 29 (1):23-43.
    Legal texts are often given interpretations that deviate from their literal meanings. While legal concerns often motivate these interpretations, others can be traced to linguistic phenomena. This paper argues that systematicities of language usage, captured by certain theories of conversational implicature, can sometimes explain why the meanings given to legal texts by judges differ from the literal meanings of the texts. Paul Grice's account of conversational implicature is controversial, and scholars have offered a variety of ways to conceptualize implicatures and (...)
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  3. Introduction.Brian G. Slocum - 2017 - In The nature of legal interpretation: what jurists can learn about legal interpretation from linguistics and philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
     
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  4. The contribution of linguistics to legal interpretation.Brian G. Slocum - 2017 - In The nature of legal interpretation: what jurists can learn about legal interpretation from linguistics and philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
     
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  5.  11
    The nature of legal interpretation: what jurists can learn about legal interpretation from linguistics and philosophy.Brian G. Slocum (ed.) - 2017 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    "Language shapes and reflects how we think about the world. It engages and intrigues us. Our everyday use of language is quite effortless--we are all experts on our native tongues. Despite this, issues of language and meaning have long flummoxed the judges on whom we depend for the interpretation of our most fundamental legal texts. Should a judge feel confident in defining common words in the texts without the aid of a linguist? How is the meaning communicated by the text (...)
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