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  1. Scientific Method.Brian Hepburn & Hanne Andersen - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    1. Overview and organizing themes 2. Historical Review: Aristotle to Mill 3. Logic of method and critical responses 3.1 Logical constructionism and Operationalism 3.2. H-D as a logic of confirmation 3.3. Popper and falsificationism 3.4 Meta-methodology and the end of method 4. Statistical methods for hypothesis testing 5. Method in Practice 5.1 Creative and exploratory practices 5.2 Computer methods and the ‘third way’ of doing science 6. Discourse on scientific method 6.1 “The scientific method” in science education and as seen (...)
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  2. Symmetry and its Formalisms: Mathematical Aspects.Brian Hepburn & Alexandre Guay - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (2):160-178.
    This article explores the relation between the concept of symmetry and its formalisms. The standard view among philosophers and physicists is that symmetry is completely formalized by mathematical groups. For some mathematicians however, the groupoid is a competing and more general formalism. An analysis of symmetry that justifies this extension has not been adequately spelled out. After a brief explication of how groups, equivalence, and symmetries classes are related, we show that, while it’s true in some instances that groups are (...)
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  3. Scientific Change.Hanne Andersen & Brian Hepburn - 2013 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientific Change How do scientific theories, concepts and methods change over time? Answers to this question have historical parts and philosophical parts. There can be descriptive accounts of the recorded differences over time of particular theories, concepts, and methods—what might be called the shape of scientific change. Many stories of scientific change attempt to give […].
     
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  4.  23
    Galileo and the Pendulum: Latching on to Time.Peter Machamer & Brian Hepburn - 2004 - Science & Education 13 (4-5):333-347.
  5.  65
    Euler, Vis Viva, And Equilibrium.Brian Hepburn - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):120-127.
    Euler’s ‘On the force of percussion and its true measure’, published in 1746, shows that not only had the issue of vis viva not been settled, but that the concepts of inertia and even force were still very much up for grabs. This paper details Euler’s treatment of the vis viva problem. Within those details we find differences between his physics and that of Newton, in particular the rejection of empty space and reduction of all forces to the operation of (...)
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  6.  34
    A Critical Examination of Abner Shimony’s Transient Now.Brian Hepburn - unknown
    I criticize Shimony's argument from the Transient Now (Shimony 1993) that the B-series view of time is inadequate but offer a reading of that argument that is more charitable than one offered and rejected by Eilstein (1996). Shimony's argument turns on putative phenomenological features of the Now (singularity and numerical identity) but transience only arises as a logical implication of those features. Transience is thus a second order phenomenon. If these two features are accurate then the B-series cannot provide a (...)
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  7.  12
    Alisa Bokulich. Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. X+195. $74.00. [REVIEW]Brian Hepburn - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):142-146.
  8.  13
    Euler's Galilean Philosophy of Science.Brian Hepburn - unknown
    Here is a phrase never uttered before: ”Euler’s philosophy of science.” Known as an extraordinary mathematician first, a mathematical physicist Known as an extraordinary mathematician first, a mathematical physicist second, but never really a physicist — not enough empirical cred — no one has considered whether Euler had a philosophy of science. Even his famed “Letters to a Princess” is described as a somewhat naive parroting of New- ton. But Euler is no Newtonian. His philosophy of science borrows from Leibniz, (...)
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  9. Equilibrium, Natural Motion, and Models of Explanation.Brian Hepburn - 2017 - In Marcus P. Adams, Zvi Biener, Uljana Feest & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (eds.), Eppur Si Muove: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer: A Collection of Essays in Honor of Peter Machamer. Springer.
    A key theme in the historiographical work of Machamer has been the ways that motion is made intelligible through explanatory means of natural motion and models of the simple machines such as the lever and pendulum. One way of spelling out the explanatory value of these strategies is through the concept of equilibrium. Natural motion and simple machines allow the simplification of complex problems in terms of self-evident, intelligible equilibrium conditions. This chapter connects the theme of equilibrium and natural motion (...)
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  10.  4
    Integrating Interdisciplinary Problem Solving Through Process.Brian Hepburn & Henrik Thorén - unknown
    An intuitive and appealing way to characterize problem solving is as the application of constraints which reduce the problem-solution space. Any advantage offered by interdisciplinary problem solving would then plausi- bly derive from the integration of constraints from the fields involved. We propose an account of interdisciplinary problem solving which treats the integration of constraints as an iterative process. Appealing to a general- ization of entity-activity dualism from mechanical explanation, we extend the accounts of Bechtel and of Craver to non-hierarchical, (...)
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  11.  34
    The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics Kastner Ruth E. Cambridge University Press, 2013; V + 224 Pp.; $101.95 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Brian Hepburn - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):401-403.
  12.  7
    The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum MechanicsRUTH E. KASTNER Cambridge University Press, 2013; V + 224 Pp.; $101.95. [REVIEW]Brian Hepburn - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):401-403.
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  13. Generic Incomparability of Infinite-Dimensional Entangled States.Christian Wüthrich, Rob Clifton & Brian Hepburn - 2002 - Physics Letters A 303:121-124.
    In support of a recent conjecture by Nielsen (1999), we prove that the phenomena of ‘incomparable entanglement’— whereby, neither member of a pair of pure entangled states can be transformed into the other via local operations and classical communication (LOCC)—is a generic feature when the states at issue live in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space.  2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
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