Results for 'Brian John Rosebury'

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  1.  76
    The Intrinsic Good of Justice.Brian John Rosebury - 2019 - Ratio Juris 32 (2):193-209.
    Some retributivists claim that when we punish wrongdoers we achieve a good: justice. The paper argues that the idea of justice, though rhetorically freighted with positive value, contains only a small core of universally-agreed meaning; and its development in a variety of competing conceptions simply recapitulates, without resolving, debates within the theory of punishment. If, to break this deadlock, we stipulate an expressly retributivist conception of justice, then we should concede that punishment which is just may be morally wrong.
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  2.  28
    Bernard Smith’s Early Marxist Art History.John O’Brian - 2005 - Thesis Eleven 82 (1):29-37.
    In a systematic investigation of national art histories, Bernard Smith’s Place, Taste and Tradition: A Study of Australian Art since 1788, first published in 1945, would likely emerge as an Ur-text of the genre. The book’s rewriting of Australian art history within a Marxist tradition of ‘culturalist’ criticism was a major advance on the available models. Its success stems in no small part from its judicious and balanced account of how social forces intersect. The book privileges economic production as a (...)
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  3.  69
    Aristotle and His Modern Critics: The Use of Tragedy in the Nontragic Vision. [REVIEW]Brian John Martine - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):859-861.
    Is there a place for the tragic vision in an orderly scheme of things? This is the question that Patrick Madigan asks in an interesting essay that explores not only the place of tragedy and comedy in human experience, but also the place of the opening that tragedy represents in the Aristotelian system. He argues that Aristotle's view of being, if rightly understood, can accept and even embrace the tragic vision, and moreover that the perspective on human experience laid open (...)
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  4.  12
    Individuals and Individuality.Brian John Martine - 1984 - State University of New York Press.
    This book provides an elegant account of the nature of the individual, without reducing it to a cluster of universals or claiming that it is a bare particular that must be acknowledged but never articulated.
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  5.  14
    Indeterminacy and Intelligibility.Brian John Martine - 1992 - State University of New York Press.
    Continuing the investigation in his earlier Individuals and individuality, Martine (philosophy, U. of Alabama) demonstrates that indeterminacy in our experience is logically bound to the determinate dimensions of thought and practice.
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  6.  43
    Book Review: Moral Appraisability: Puzzles, Proposals and Perplexities. [REVIEW]Brian Rosebury - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):132-135.
    Moral Appraisability is not quite such a good book as its confident and lucid introduction leads one to hope, but it is work of both substance and promise. Ishtiyaque Haji’s main project is to determine sufficient conditions for moral appraisability: that is, for the propriety of holding an agent praiseworthy or blameworthy for an action. Identifying three primary conditions—control, autonomy, and epistemic—he refines them with the aid of a meticulous analysis of recent discussions and a range of vivid examples, and (...)
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  7.  22
    Book Review: The Unnatural Lottery. [REVIEW]Brian Rosebury - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):291-293.
    Claudia Card’s The Unnatural Lottery is a fluently written and intricately argued study of the importance of historical difference for moral thought and action. It moves from theoretical and methodological arguments, in which the philosophical interest of the work largely resides, into a series of applications, mainly in the field of sexual politics, which are always at least thought-provoking.
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  8. Moral Responsibility and "Moral Luck".Brian Rosebury - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):499-524.
    This paper argues that "moral luck", understood as a susceptibility of moral desert to lucky or unlucky outcomes, does not exist. The argument turns on the claim that epistemic inquiry is an indissoluble part of moral responsibility, and that judgment on the moral decision making of others should and can adjust for this fact; test cases which aim to isolate moral dilemmas from epistemic consideration misrepresent our moral experience. If the phenomena believed by some philosophers to exemplify the need to (...)
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  9.  6
    On Clement Greenberg's Critical WritingsClement Greenberg: The Collected Essays and Criticism.Miles Edward Friend & John O'Brian - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 30 (1):99.
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  10.  84
    Moore’s Moral Facts and the Gap in the Retributive Theory.Brian Rosebury - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):361-376.
    The purely retributive moral justification of punishment has a gap at its centre. It fails to explain why the offender should not be protected from punishment by the intuitively powerful moral idea that afflicting another person (other than to avoid a greater harm) is always wrong. Attempts to close the gap have taken several different forms, and only one is discussed in this paper. This is the attempt to push aside the ‘protecting’ intuition, using some more powerful intuition specially invoked (...)
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  11. Private Revenge and its Relation to Punishment.Brian Rosebury - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (1):1-21.
    In contrast to the vast literature on retributive theories of punishment, discussions of private revenge are rare in moral philosophy. This paper reviews some examples, from both classical and recent writers, finding uncertainty and equivocation over the ethical significance of acts of revenge, and in particular over their possible resemblances, in motive, purpose or justification, to acts of lawful punishment. A key problem for the coherence of our ethical conception of revenge is the consideration that certain acts of revenge may (...)
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  12.  10
    Nietzsche.John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    The latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Philosophy series, this work brings together some of the best and most influential recent philosophical scholarship on Nietzsche. Opening with a substantial introduction by John Richardson, it covers: Nietzsche's views on truth and knowledge, his 'doctrines' of the eternal recurrence and will to power, his distinction between Apollinian and Dionysian art, his critique of morality, his conceptions of agency and self-creation, and his genealogical method. For each of these issues, the papers (...)
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  13. The Quantified Relationship.John Danaher, Sven Nyholm & Brian D. Earp - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):3-19.
    The growth of self-tracking and personal surveillance has given rise to the Quantified Self movement. Members of this movement seek to enhance their personal well-being, productivity, and self-actualization through the tracking and gamification of personal data. The technologies that make this possible can also track and gamify aspects of our interpersonal, romantic relationships. Several authors have begun to challenge the ethical and normative implications of this development. In this article, we build upon this work to provide a detailed ethical analysis (...)
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  14.  32
    The Theory of the Offender's Forfeited Right.Brian Rosebury - 2015 - Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (3):259-283.
    In justifying punishment we sometimes appeal to the idea that the punished offender has, by his criminal action against others, forfeited his moral right (and therefore his legal right) against hard treatment by the state. The imposition of suffering, or deprivation of liberty, loses its prima facie morally objectionable character, and becomes morally permissible. Philosophers interrogating the forfeited right theory generally focus on whether the forfeiting of the right constitutes a necessary or a sufficient condition for punishment to be permissible; (...)
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  15. Fiction, Emotion and ’Belief’: A Reply to Eva Schaper.Brian Rosebury - 1979 - British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (2):120-130.
    The paper argues that our emotions in response to fictional representations are best explained, not as requiring a suspension of disbelief, but as resembling the emotions we feel when we propound a hypothetical case to ourselves, such as the imagined happiness or suffering of ourselves or another. In reading fiction we voluntarily participate in a hypothesis represented by the work. If this explanation is accepted, we can retain the view that beliefs always entail commitment to the reality of what is (...)
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  16. Non-Reductionism and John Searle’s The Rediscovery of the Mind.Brian J. Garrett & John Searle - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):209.
  17.  77
    Book Review: On Empson.Brian Rosebury - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-3.
    A review of Michael Wood's book, On Empson.
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  18.  5
    Kant After GreenbergThe Collected Essays and CriticismClement Greenberg Between the LinesKant After Duchamp.Stephen Melville, Clement Greenberg, John O'Brian & Thierry de Duve - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (1):67.
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  19. The Historical Contingency of Aesthetic Experience.Brian Rosebury - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):73-88.
    The paper seeks to defend the following view. Aesthetic experience is historically contingent. Each of us is situated at a unique point in space and time, from which standpoint we continuously imagine our personal, and our collective, history. Our experience of any object of aesthetic intention is susceptible of being influenced by associations, that is by our locating the contemplated object in relation to some part or parts of this imagined history. We should not be embarrassed by the role that (...)
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  20.  9
    Book Review: Deontic Morality and Control. [REVIEW]Brian Rosebury - 2004 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (1):112-115.
  21. Respect for Just Revenge.Brian Rosebury - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (2):451-471.
    The paper considers acts of private (in the sense of individually motivated and extra-legal) revenge, and draws attention to a special kind of judgement we may make of such acts. While endorsing the general view that an act of private revenge must be morally wrong, it maintains that under certain special conditions (which include its being just) it is susceptible of a rational respect from others which is based on its standing outside morality, as a choice by the revenger not (...)
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  22.  12
    Informed Altruism and Utilitarianism.Brian Rosebury - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice 47 (4):717-746.
    Utilitarianism is a consequentialist theory that assigns value impartially to the well-being of each person. Informed Altruism, introduced in this article, is an intentionalist theory that relegates both consequentialism and impartiality to subordinate roles. It identifies morally right or commendable actions as those motivated by a sufficiently informed intention to benefit and not harm others. An implication of the theory is that multiple agents may perform incompatible actions and yet each be acting rightly in a moral sense.
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  23.  75
    Reply to Silcox on Moral Luck.Brian Rosebury - 2009 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (1):109-113.
    In earlier work, I argued that examples supposed to substantiate consequential moral luck can lose their anomalous appearance if due account is taken of the moral obligation to discharge epistemic responsibilities, and of the different scope and focus of this obligation for the agent as contrasted with the observer. In his recent JMP article, Mark Silcox argues that my explanatory strategy is dependent on an unacceptable commitment to an ‘ineliminable epistemic gulf’ between first-person and third-person perspectives. Here I attempt a (...)
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  24.  23
    J. R. R. Tolkien’s Double Worlds and Creative Process: Language and Life. [REVIEW]Brian Rosebury - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (3):409-410.
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  25.  45
    The Political Logic of Victim Impact Statements.Brian Rosebury - 2011 - Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (1):39-67.
    The paper examines three aspects of the debate over the introduction of victim impact statements (VIS) in criminal cases. The first is the challenge VIS presents to the wholly public conception of criminal justice, in which the offender is prosecuted, tried and punished in the name of the state and not the individual victim. The second is the claim by supporters of VIS that the enhancement of victim input contributes to repairing an imbalance between offender and victim, created by the (...)
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  26. The World as One of a Kind: Natural Necessity and Laws of Nature.John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):371-388.
  27.  47
    Irrecoverable Intentions and Literary Interpretation.Brian Rosebury - 1997 - British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (1):15-30.
    The paper explores the relevance of irrecoverable authorial intentions to the interpretation of texts. It suggests that the ways in which different conventions of discourse take account of the existence of irrecoverable intentions (i.e. of the failure of texts perfectly to represent their authors' intentions) can guide us to a criterion for distinguishing 'literary' from 'non-literary' texts, or 'literary'(aesthetically motivated) from 'non-literary' readings of texts.
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  28.  27
    On Punishing Emotions.Brian Rosebury - 2003 - Ratio Juris 16 (1):37-55.
    This paper challenges recent influential arguments which would encourage legislators and courts to give weight to an assessment of the “evaluative judgements” expressed by the emotions which motivate crimes. While accepting the claim of Kahan and Nussbaum and others that emotions, other than moods, have intentional objects , and are not mere impulses which bypass cognition, it suggests the following criticisms of their analysis. First, the concept of an emotional “evaluative judgement” tends to elide the distinction between “judgements” that are (...)
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  29.  34
    Publication and Other Reporting Biases in Cognitive Sciences: Detection, Prevalence, and Prevention.John P. A. Ioannidis, Marcus R. Munafò, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Brian A. Nosek & Sean P. David - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (5):235-241.
  30.  41
    The Benefits and Risks of Quantified Relationship Technologies: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Quantified Relationship”.John Danaher, Sven Nyholm & Brian D. Earp - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):3-6.
    The growth of self-tracking and personal surveillance has given rise to the Quantified Self movement. Members of this movement seek to enhance their personal well-being, productivity, and self-actualization through the tracking and gamification of personal data. The technologies that make this possible can also track and gamify aspects of our interpersonal, romantic relationships. Several authors have begun to challenge the ethical and normative implications of this development. In this article, we build upon this work to provide a detailed ethical analysis (...)
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  31. Forces.John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Robert Pargetter - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (4):614-630.
    Traditionally, forces are causes of a special sort. Forces have been conceived to be the direct or immediate causes of things. Other sorts of causes act indirectly by producing forces which are transmitted in various ways to produce various effects. However, forces are supposed to act directly without the mediation of anything else. But forces, so conceived, appear to be occult. They are mysterious, because we have no clear conception of what they are, as opposed to what they are postulated (...)
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  32. Should We Campaign Against Sex Robots?John Danaher, Brian D. Earp & Anders Sandberg - 2017 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    In September 2015 a well-publicised Campaign Against Sex Robots (CASR) was launched. Modelled on the longer-standing Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the CASR opposes the development of sex robots on the grounds that the technology is being developed with a particular model of female-male relations (the prostitute-john model) in mind, and that this will prove harmful in various ways. In this chapter, we consider carefully the merits of campaigning against such a technology. We make three main arguments. First, we (...)
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  33. Partiality and Impartiality: Morality, Special Relationships, and the Wider World.Brian Feltham & John Cottingham (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    A central theme of the volume is whether impartiality and partiality are really opposed dimensions or if they can be harmoniously reconciled in one picture of ...
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  34. The Editors Wish to Express Their Appreciation to the Following Individuals Who, Though Not Members of the Advisory Board, Generously Reviewed Manuscripts for The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy During 2005: Holly Anderson, Nicholas Capaldi, Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, John R. Graham, Albert.John R. Klune Jonsen, Marta Kolthopp, Gilbert Meilander Lawry, Jonathan Moreno, David Resnik, Brian Taylor Slingsby & J. Robert Thompson - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (323).
     
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  35.  13
    John Rawls and the Search for StabilityA Theory of Justice. John RawlsPolitical Liberalism. John Rawls.Brian Barry - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):874-915.
  36.  13
    Interview with Brian Kemple.Brian Kemple, William Passarini & Tim Troutman - unknown
    Listen to the interview with Brian Kemple... and learn to appreciate the diachronic trajectory of semiotics. *** Live interview with Brian Kemple, Executive Director of the Lyceum Institute, to discuss the legacy and influence of John Deely, the thinker most responsible for developing semiotics into the 21st century. This interview, conducted by William Passarini and Tim Troutman, is part of the preliminary activities of the 2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics: a Tribute to John Deely on (...)
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  37. John Rawls and the Search for Stability. [REVIEW]Brian Barry - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):874 - 915.
  38. Embodiment in Social Psychology.Brian P. Meier, Simone Schnall, Norbert Schwarz & John A. Bargh - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):705-716.
    Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage (...)
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  39.  22
    “Brain Death,” “Dead,” and Parental Denial.John J. Paris, Brian M. Cummings & M. Patrick Moore - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):371-382.
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  40. The Liberal Theory of Justice: A Critical Examination of the Principal Doctrines in a Theory of Justice by John Rawls.Brian M. Barry - 1973 - Oxford, Clarendon Press.
    "John Rawls's A Theory of Justice has been widely acclaimed as a book whose influence on the discussion of central questions in moral and political philosophy will be permanent. A brief review, writes Dr. Barry, would be of little more value than would be a brief review of Hobbes's Leviathan; instead, in this book he interprets Rawls's main tenets and discusses them with appropriate thoroughness. The book is in three parts. Chapters 1-5 set Rawls's theory in its intellectual context (...)
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  41.  16
    Approaches to Parental Demand for Non-Established Medical Treatment: Reflections on the Charlie Gard Case.John J. Paris, Brian M. Cummings, Michael P. Moreland & Jason N. Batten - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):443-447.
    The opinion of Mr. Justice Francis of the English High Court which denied the parents of Charlie Gard, who had been born with an extremely rare mutation of a genetic disease, the right to take their child to the United States for a proposed experimental treatment occasioned world wide attention including that of the Pope, President Trump, and the US Congress. The case raise anew a debate as old as the foundation of Western medicine on who should decide and on (...)
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  42.  12
    Why Are There So Few Ethics Consults in Children’s Hospitals?Brian Carter, Manuel Brockman, Jeremy Garrett, Angie Knackstedt & John Lantos - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (2):91-102.
    In most children’s hospitals, there are very few ethics consultations, even though there are many ethically complex cases. We hypothesize that the reason for this may be that hospitals develop different mechanisms to address ethical issues and that many of these mechanisms are closer in spirit to the goals of the pioneers of clinical ethics than is the mechanism of a formal ethics consultation. To show how this is true, we first review the history of collaboration between philosophers and physicians (...)
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  43. Epistemic Modals in Context.Andy Egan, John Hawthorne & Brian Weatherson - 2005 - In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Contextualism in Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 131-170.
    A very simple contextualist treatment of a sentence containing an epistemic modal, e.g. a might be F, is that it is true iff for all the contextually salient community knows, a is F. It is widely agreed that the simple theory will not work in some cases, but the counterexamples produced so far seem amenable to a more complicated contextualist theory. We argue, however, that no contextualist theory can capture the evaluations speakers naturally make of sentences containing epistemic modals. If (...)
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  44. John Rawls and the Priority of Liberty.Brian Barry - 1973 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (3):274-290.
  45.  13
    The Folk Theory of Well-Being.John Bronsteen, Brian Leiter, Jonathan Masur & Kevin Tobia - forthcoming - In Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 5.
    What constitutes a “good” life—not necessarily a morally good life, but a life that is good for the person who lived it? In response to this question of “well-being," philosophers have offered three significant answers: A good life is one in which a person can satisfy their desires (“Desire-Satisfaction” or “Preferentism”), one that includes certain good features (“Objectivism”), or one in which pleasurable states dominate or outweigh painful ones (“Hedonism”). To adjudicate among these competing theories, moral philosophers traditionally gather data (...)
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  46. Improving Schools' Performance and Potential.John Gray, David Hopkins, David Reynolds, Brian Wilcox, Shaun Farrell & David Jesson - 2000 - British Journal of Educational Studies 48 (1):91-93.
     
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  47. Chopping Up Gunk.John Hawthorne & Brian Weatherson - 2004 - The Monist 87 (3):339-50.
    We show that someone who believes in both gunk and the possibility of supertasks has to give up either a plausible principle about where gunk can be located, or plausible conservation principles.
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  48. On Religion.John D. Caputo, Slavoj Žižek, Hubert L. Dreyfus, Brian K. Ridley, Jacques Derrida & Michael Dummett - 2004 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (3):371-372.
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  49.  23
    On Painting.Leon Battista Alberti, John R. Spencer, Creighton Gilbert, E. W. Dickes & Brian Battershaw - 1956 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (1):148-148.
  50.  14
    Longshot, Fantasy, and Pipedreams.John J. Paris & Brian M. Cummings - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):19-21.
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