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  1.  13
    Managed Care and Public Health: Conflict and Collaboration.Sara Rosenbaum & Brian Kamoie - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):191-200.
    This article reviews the relationship between managed care and public health. Managed care, with its seemingly infinite structural and organizational variation, dominates the modern American health-care system for the non-elderly U.S. population. Through its emphasis on standarhzed practice norms and performance measurement, coupled with industrial purchasing techniques, prepayment, risk downstreaming, and incentives-based compensation, managed care has the potential to exert considerable influence over the manner in which the health-care system is organized and functions. Given the degree to which the attainment (...)
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  2.  19
    Managed Care and Public Health: Conflict and Collaboration.Sara Rosenbaum & Brian Kamoie - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):191-200.
    This article reviews the relationship between managed care and public health. Managed care, with its seemingly infinite structural and organizational variation, dominates the modern American health-care system for the non-elderly U.S. population. Through its emphasis on standarhzed practice norms and performance measurement, coupled with industrial purchasing techniques, prepayment, risk downstreaming, and incentives-based compensation, managed care has the potential to exert considerable influence over the manner in which the health-care system is organized and functions. Given the degree to which the attainment (...)
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  3.  15
    Finding a Way Through the Hospital Door: The Role of EMTALA in Public Health Emergencies.Sara Rosenbaum & Brian Kamoie - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):590-601.
    This article examines the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act in a public health emergency context. Congress enacted EMTALA in 1986 to prohibit the practice of “patient clumping,” which involved hospitals’ refusal to undertake emergency screening and stabilization services for individual patients who sought emergency room care, typically because of insurance status, inability to pay, or other grounds unrelated to the patient’s need for the services or the hospital’s ability to provide them. But in fact EMTALA, whose conceptual roots can (...)
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  4.  4
    Finding a Way Through the Hospital Door: The Role of EMTALA in Public Health Emergencies.Sara Rosenbaum & Brian Kamoie - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):590-601.
    This article examines the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act in a public health emergency context. Congress enacted EMTALA in 1986 to prohibit the practice of “patient clumping,” which involved hospitals’ refusal to undertake emergency screening and stabilization services for individual patients who sought emergency room care, typically because of insurance status, inability to pay, or other grounds unrelated to the patient’s need for the services or the hospital’s ability to provide them. But in fact EMTALA, whose conceptual roots can (...)
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  5.  11
    Assessing Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Brian Kamoie, Robert M. Pestronk, Peter Baldridge, David Fidler, Leah Devlin, George A. Mensah & Michael Doney - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):23-27.
    Public health legal preparedness begins with effective legal authorities, and law provides a key foundation for public health practice in the United States. Laws not only create public health agencies and fund them, but also authorize and impose duties upon government to protect the public's health while preserving individual liberties. As a result, law is an essential tool in public health practice and is one element of public health infrastructure, as it defines the systems and relationships within which public health (...)
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  6.  5
    Assessing Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Brian Kamoie, Robert M. Pestronk, Peter Baldridge, David Fidler, Leah Devlin, George A. Mensah & Michael Doney - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):23-27.
    Public health legal preparedness begins with effective legal authorities, and law provides a key foundation for public health practice in the United States. Laws not only create public health agencies and fund them, but also authorize and impose duties upon government to protect the public's health while preserving individual liberties. As a result, law is an essential tool in public health practice and is one element of public health infrastructure, as it defines the systems and relationships within which public health (...)
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  7.  23
    Improving Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Robert M. Pestronk, Brian Kamoie, David Fidler, Gene Matthews, Georges C. Benjamin, Ralph T. Bryan, Socrates H. Tuch, Richard Gottfried, Jonathan E. Fielding, Fran Schmitz & Stephen Redd - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):47-51.
    This paper is one of the four interrelated action agenda papers resulting from the National Summit on Public Health Legal Preparedness convened in June 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and multi-disciplinary partners. Each of the action agenda papers deals with one of the four core elements of legal preparedness: laws and legal authorities; competency in using those laws; coordination of law-based public health actions; and information. Options presented in this paper are for consideration by policymakers and (...)
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  8.  6
    Improving Laws and Legal Authorities for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness.Robert M. Pestronk, Brian Kamoie, David Fidler, Gene Matthews, Georges C. Benjamin, Ralph T. Bryan, Socrates H. Tuch, Richard Gottfried, Jonathan E. Fielding, Fran Schmitz & Stephen Redd - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):47-51.
    This paper is one of the four interrelated action agenda papers resulting from the National Summit on Public Health Legal Preparedness convened in June 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and multi-disciplinary partners. Each of the action agenda papers deals with one of the four core elements of legal preparedness: laws and legal authorities; competency in using those laws; coordination of law-based public health actions; and information. Options presented in this paper are for consideration by policymakers and (...)
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