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Brian Leftow [120]Brian Lee Leftow [1]
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Brian Leftow
Rutgers University - New Brunswick
  1.  12
    Time and Eternity.Brian Leftow - 2019 - Cornell University Press.
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  2. God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
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  3.  78
    Time and Eternity.Brian Leftow - 1991 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    [I] Introduction The Western religions all claim that God is eternal. This claim finds strong expression in the Old Testament, which is common property of ...
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  4. A Latin Trinity.Brian Leftow - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):304-333.
    Latin models of the Trinity begin from the existence of one God, and try to explain how one God can be three Persons. I offer an account of this based on an analogy with time-travel. A time-traveler returning to the same point in time repeatedly might have three successive events in his/her life occurring at that one location in public time. So too, God’s life might be such that three distinct parts of His life are always occurring at once, though (...)
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  5. Is God an Abstract Object?Brian Leftow - 1990 - Noûs 24 (4):581-598.
    Before Duns Scotus, most philosophers agreed that God is identical with His necessary intrinsic attributes--omnipotence, omniscience, etc. This Identity Thesis was a component of widely held doctrines of divine simplicity, which stated that God exemplifies no metaphysical distinctions, including that between subject and attribute. The Identity Thesis seems to render God an attribute, an abstract object. This paper shows that the Identity Thesis follows from a basic theistic belief and does not render God abstract. If also discusses how one might (...)
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  6. Why Perfect Being Theology?Brian Leftow - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):103-118.
    I display the historical roots of perfect being theology in Greco-Roman philosophy, and the distinctive reasons for Christians to take up a version of this project. I also rebut a recent argument that perfect-being reasoning should lead one to atheism.
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  7. Anti Social Trinitarianism.Brian Leftow - 1999 - In Trinity, The. Oxford University Press. pp. 203-249.
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  8. A Timeless God Incarnate.Brian Leftow - 2002 - In Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.), The Incarnation. Oxford Up. pp. 273--299.
     
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  9. Divine Simplicity.Brian Leftow - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (4):365-380.
    Augustine, Aquinas and many other medievals held the doctrine of divine simplicity (DDS) -that God has no parts of any sort. Augustine took this to imply that for any non-relational attribute F, if God is F, God = Fness. This can seem to create three problems. I set them out. Having done so, I show that Augustine's DDS is set within a view of attributes now unfamiliar to us. When we bring this into the picture, it turns out that two (...)
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  10.  66
    Omnipotence.Brian Leftow - 2009 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine that God is omnipotent takes its rise from Scriptural texts which concern two linked topics. One is how much power God has to put behind actions: enough that nothing is too hard, enough to do whatever he pleases. The other is how much God can do: ‘all things’. The link is obvious: we measure strength by what tasks it is adequate to perform, and God is so strong he can do all things. The Christian philosophical theologian who seeks (...)
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  11. Swinburne on Divine Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (2):141-162.
    Most analytic philosophers hold that if God exists, He exists with broad logical necessity. Richard Swinburne denies the distinction between narrow and broad logical necessity, and argues that if God exists, His existence is narrow-logically contingent. A defender of divine broad logical necessity could grant the latter claim. I argue, however, that not only is God's existence broad-logically necessary, but on a certain understanding of God's relation to modality, it comes out narrow-logically necessary. This piece argues against Swinburne's overall account (...)
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  12. Modes Without Modalism.Brian Leftow - 2007 - In Peter van Inwagen and Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Persons: Human and Divine. Oxford University Press. pp. 357--375.
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  13.  92
    Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom.Brian Leftow - 2015 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 89:45-56.
    I explain the doctrine of divine simplicity, and reject what is now the standard way to explicate it in analytic philosophy. I show that divine simplicity imperils the claim that God is free, and argue against a popular proposal for dealing with the problem.
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  14.  21
    God, Time and Knowledge.Brian Leftow - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):444.
  15.  52
    Tempting God.Brian Leftow - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):3-23.
    Western theism holds that God cannot do evil. Christians also hold that Christ is God the Son and that Christ was tempted to do evil. These claims appear to be jointly inconsistent. I argue that they are not.
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  16. On God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (4):435-459.
    My God and Necessity offers a theist a theory of modal truth. Two recent articles criticize the theory’s motivation and main features. I reply to these criticisms.
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  17. The Ontological Argument.Brian Leftow - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter presents and critically discusses the main historical variants of the “ontological argument,” a form of a priori argument for the existence of God pioneered by Anselm of Canterbury. I assess the contributions of Anselm, Descartes, Leibniz, and Gödel, and criticisms by Gaunilo, Kant, and Oppy among others.
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  18.  98
    No Best World: Moral Luck.Brian Leftow - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (2):165-181.
    William Rowe and others argue that if ours is a possible world than which there is a better, it follows that God does not exist. If this is correct, then if there is no best possible world, it is not so much as possible that God exist. I reject the key premise of Rowe's argument. The key to seeing that it is false, I suggest, is seeing that God is subject to something fairly called moral luck. In this first part (...)
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  19.  62
    The Trinity is Unconstitutional.Brian Leftow - 2018 - Religious Studies 54 (3):359-376.
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  20.  86
    No Best World: Creaturely Freedom.Brian Leftow - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (3):269-285.
    William Rowe and others argue that if this is a possible world than which there is a better, it follows that God does not exist. I now reject the key premise of Rowe's argument. I do so first within a Molinist framework. I then show that this framework is dispensable: really all one needs to block the better-world argument is the assumption that creatures have libertarian free will. I also foreclose what might seem a promising way around the 'moral-luck' counter (...)
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  21.  12
    Souls Dipped in Dust.Brian Leftow - 2001 - In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival: Essays on the Metaphysics of Human Persons. Cornell University Press. pp. 120--138.
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  22.  97
    Perfection and Possibility.Brian Leftow - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (4):423-431.
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  23.  34
    Two Trinities: Reply to Hasker.Brian Leftow - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (4):441 - 447.
    William Hasker replies to my arguments against social Trinitarianism, offers some criticism of my own view, and begins a sketch of another account of the Trinity. I reply with some defence of my own theory and some questions about his.
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  24.  9
    The Dilemma of Freedom and Foreknowledge.Brian Leftow - 1991 - Ethics 103 (1):163-164.
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  25. A Naturalist Cosmological Argument.Brian Leftow - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (3):321-338.
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  26.  97
    The Nature of Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (3):359-383.
    I give an account of the nature of absolute or metaphysical necessity. Absolute-necessarily P, I suggest, just if it is always the case that P and there never is or was a power with a chance to bring it about, bring about a power to bring it about, etc., that not P. I display both advantages and a cost of this sort of definition.
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  27. A Leibnizian Cosmological Argument.Brian Leftow - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 57 (2):135 - 155.
    I explicate and defend leibniz's argument from "eternal truths" to the existence of god. I argue that necessary beings can be caused to exist, Showing how one can apply a counterfactual analysis to such causation, Then argue that if such beings can be caused to exist, They are.
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  28.  93
    God and Abstract Entities.Brian Leftow - 1990 - Faith and Philosophy 7 (2):193-217.
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  29. Impossible Worlds.Brian Leftow - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (4):393-402.
    Richard Brian Davis offers several criticisms of a semantics I once proposed for subjunctive conditionals with impossible antecedents. I reply to these.
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  30.  45
    The Cambridge Companion to Anselm.Brian Leftow (ed.) - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109), Benedictine monk and the second Norman archbishop of Canterbury, is regarded as one of the most important philosophers and theologians of the Middle Ages. The essays in this volume explore all of his major ideas both philosophical and theological, including his teachings on faith and reason, God's existence and nature, logic, freedom, truth, ethics, and key Christian doctrines. There is also discussion of his life, the sources of his thought, and his influence on other thinkers. New (...)
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  31. Anselm's Perfect Being Theology.Brian Leftow - 2004 - In The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Cambridge University Press. pp. 132--156.
     
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  32. Anselmian Presentism.Brian Leftow - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (3):297-319.
    I rebut four claims made in a recent article by Katherin Rogers. En route I discuss how a timeless God might perceive all of “tensed” time at once.
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  33. God’s Deontic Perfection.Brian Leftow - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (1):69-95.
    I offer part of an account of divine moral perfection. I defend the claim that moral perfection is possible, then argue that God has obligations, so that one part of his moral perfection must be perfection in meeting these. I take up objections to divine obligations, then finally offer a definition of divine deontic perfection.
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  34.  90
    Aquinas on Attributes.Brian Leftow - 2003 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 11 (1):1-41.
  35.  64
    11. God and the Problem of Universals.Brian Leftow - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 2:325.
  36.  52
    Composition and Christology.Brian Leftow - 2011 - Faith and Philosophy 28 (3):310-322.
    One central claim of orthodox Christianity is that in Jesus of Nazareth, God became man. On Chalcedonian orthodoxy, this involves one person, God the Son, having two natures, divine and human. If He does, one person has two properties, deity and humanity. But the Incarnation also involves concrete objects, God the Son (GS), Jesus’s human body (B) and—I will assume—Jesus’s human soul (S). If God becomes human, GS, B and S somehow become one thing. It would be good to have (...)
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  37.  51
    Eternity and Simultaneity.Brian Leftow - 1991 - Faith and Philosophy 8 (2):148-179.
  38.  34
    Two Trinities: Reply to Hasker: Brian Leftow.Brian Leftow - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (4):441-447.
    William Hasker replies to my arguments against Social Trinitarianism, offers some criticism of my own view, and begins a sketch of another account of the Trinity. I reply with some defence of my own theory and some questions about his.
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  39.  85
    Time Travel and the Trinity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):313-324.
    I have used a time travel story to model the “Latin” version of the Trinity. William Hasker’s “A Leftovian Trinity?” criticizes my arguments. This piece replies.
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  40.  97
    Immutability.Brian Leftow - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  41. Aquinas on Time and Eternity.Brian Leftow - 1990 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (3):387-399.
  42. One Step Toward God.Brian Leftow - 2011 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68:67-103.
    I describe a new argument for the existence of God, and argue one of its steps. En route I criticize class-nominalist theories of attributes, and sketch an alternate theory involving God.
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  43.  51
    On Hasker on Leftow on Hasker on Leftow.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):334-339.
    William Hasker has rejected my rejection of his criticisms of my “Latin” account of the Trinity. I now reject his rejection.
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  44.  70
    Aquinas on God and Modal Truth.Brian Leftow - 2005 - Modern Schoolman 82 (3):171-200.
  45.  60
    Anselm on Omnipresence.Brian Leftow - 1989 - New Scholasticism 63 (3):326-357.
  46. A Modal Cosmological Argument.Brian Leftow - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 24 (3):159 - 188.
  47. Necessary Moral Perfection.Brian Leftow - 1989 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 70 (3):240-260.
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  48.  54
    Précis of God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (3):1--3.
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  49. Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Questions on God.Brian Leftow & Brian Davies (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Aquinas was one of the greatest of the medieval philosophers. His Summa Theologiae is his most important contribution to Christian theology, and one of the main sources for his philosophy. This volume offers most of the Summa's first 26 questions, including all of those on the existence and nature of God. Based on the 1960 Blackfriars translation, this version has been extensively revised by Brian Davies and also includes an introduction by Brian Leftow which places the questions in their (...)
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  50.  49
    The Roots of Eternity.Brian Leftow - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (2):189 - 212.
    The claim that God is eternal is a standard feature of late–classical and mediaeval philosophical theology. It is prominent in discussions of the relation of God's foreknowledge to human freedom, and its consequences pervade traditional accounts of other kinds of divine knowledge, of God's will, and of God's relation to the world. So an examination of the concept of eternity promises to repay our efforts with a better understanding of the history of philosophical theology and with insight into the concept (...)
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