Results for 'Brian Preston'

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  1.  13
    Addressing Socio-Economic and Ethical Considerations in Biotechnology Governance: The Potential of a New Politics of Care.Fern Wickson, Christopher Preston, Rosa Binimelis, Amaranta Herrero, Sarah Hartley, Rachel Wynberg & Brian Wynne - 2017 - Food Ethics 1 (2):193-199.
    There is a growing demand to incorporate social, economic and ethical considerations into biotechnology governance. However, there is currently little guidance available for understanding what this means or how it should be done. A framework of care-based ethics and politics can capture many of the concerns maintaining a persistent socio-political conflict over biotechnologies and provide a novel way to incorporate such considerations into regulatory assessments. A care-based approach to ethics and politics has six key defining features. These include: 1) a (...)
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  2.  23
    Short Notices.D. J. Foskett, John Hayes, John Cumming, M. F. Cleugh, E. B. Castle, A. E. M. Seaborne, K. G. Mukherjee, S. Beaumont, K. W. Keohane, John Lawson, C. P. Hill, Brian Holmes, R. D. Gidney, L. J. Lewis, Maurice Preston & A. C. F. Beales - 1968 - British Journal of Educational Studies 16 (2):220-232.
  3. A Puzzle for Particulars?David S. Brown & Richard Brian Davis - 2008 - Axiomathes 18 (1):49-65.
    In this paper we examine a puzzle recently posed by Aaron Preston for the traditional realist assay of property (quality) instances. Consider Socrates (a red round spot) and red1—Socrates’ redness. For the traditional realist, both of these entities are concrete particulars. Further, both involve redness being `tied to’ the same bare individuator. But then it appears that red1 is duplicated in its ‘thicker’ particular (Socrates), so that it can’t be predicated of Socrates without redundancy. According to Preston, this (...)
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  4.  42
    A Philosophy of Material Culture: Action, Function, and Mind.Beth Preston - 2012 - Routledge.
    This book focuses on material culture as a subject of philosophical inquiry and promotes the philosophical study of material culture by articulating some of the central and difficult issues raised by this topic and providing innovative solutions to them, most notably an account of improvised action and a non-intentionalist account of function in material culture. Preston argues that material culture essentially involves activities of production and use; she therefore adopts an action-theoretic foundation for a philosophy of material culture. Part (...)
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  5.  20
    Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, Vol. 6: Journals NB11–NB14. Edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Joel D.S. Rasmussen, Vanessa Rumble, and K. Brian Söderquist. [REVIEW]Brian Gregor - 2015 - International Philosophical Quarterly 55 (2):254-256.
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  6. Wittgenstein a Life.Brian Mcguinness - 1990
     
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  7.  66
    Signals: Evolution, Learning, and Information.Brian Skyrms - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Brian Skyrms offers a fascinating demonstration of how fundamental signals are to our world. He uses various scientific tools to investigate how meaning and communication develop. Signals operate in networks of senders and receivers at all levels of life, transmitting and processing information. That is how humans and animals think and interact.
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  8.  63
    Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble, and K. Brian Söderquist, Eds. , Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks Volume 3: Notebooks 1-15 . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Brian Gregor - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (2):107-110.
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  9.  40
    Niels Jørgen Cappelørn , Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Joel D. S. Rasmussen, Vanessa Rumble, & K. Brian Söderquist, Eds., Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks Vol 5: Journals NB6—NB10 . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Brian Gregor - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (6):485-488.
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  10.  21
    Analytic Philosophy: The History of an Illusion.Aaron Preston - 2010 - Continuum.
  11.  13
    Interview with Brian Kemple.Brian Kemple, William Passarini & Tim Troutman - unknown
    Listen to the interview with Brian Kemple... and learn to appreciate the diachronic trajectory of semiotics. *** Live interview with Brian Kemple, Executive Director of the Lyceum Institute, to discuss the legacy and influence of John Deely, the thinker most responsible for developing semiotics into the 21st century. This interview, conducted by William Passarini and Tim Troutman, is part of the preliminary activities of the 2022 International Open Seminar on Semiotics: a Tribute to John Deely on the Fifth (...)
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  12.  41
    Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, Vol. 7. Edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, Bruce H. Kirmmse, David D. Possen, Joel D. S. Rasmussen, Vanessa Rumble, and K. Brian Söderquist. [REVIEW]Brian Gregor - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (4):857-859.
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  13.  2
    On the Origin of Objects.Brian Cantwell Smith - 1996 - MIT Press.
    On the Origin of Objects is the culmination of Brian Cantwell Smith's decade-long investigation into the philosophical and metaphysical foundations of computation, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science. Based on a sustained critique of the formal tradition that underlies the reigning views, he presents an argument for an embedded, participatory, "irreductionist," metaphysical alternative. Smith seeks nothing less than to revise our understanding not only of the machines we build but also of the world with which they interact. Smith's ambitious project (...)
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  14. Brian Davies, The Thought of Thomas Aquinas. First Paperback Ed. New York and Oxford: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1993. Paper. Pp. Xvi, 391. $19.95. First Published in 1992. [REVIEW]Brian J. Shanley - 1995 - Speculum 70 (4):895-897.
  15.  43
    Brian Teare, From The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven.Brian Teare - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):277-281.
  16.  12
    Brian Fay on Philosophy and Temporality From Kant to Critical Theory. By Espen Hammer. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Pp. Ix, 260. [REVIEW]Brian Fay - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (1):91-109.
    Espen Hammer’s exceptionally fine book explores modern temporality, its problems and prospects. Hammer claims that how people experience time is a cultural/historical phenomenon, and that there is a peculiarly modern way of experiencing time as a series of present moments each indefinitely leading to the next in an ordered way. Time as measured by the clock is the paradigmatic instance of this sense of time. In this perspective time is quantifiable and forward-looking, and the present is dominated by the future. (...)
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  17.  73
    Evolution of the Social Contract.Brian Skyrms - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this pithy and highly readable book, Brian Skyrms, a recognised authority on game and decision theory, investigates traditional problems of the social contract in terms of evolutionary dynamics. Game theory is skilfully employed to offer new interpretations of a wide variety of social phenomena, including justice, mutual aid, commitment, convention and meaning. The author eschews any grand, unified theory. Rather, he presents the reader with tools drawn from evolutionary game theory for the purpose of analysing and coming to (...)
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  18. Brian O'Shaughnessy: "The Will". [REVIEW]Brian Davies - 1983 - The Thomist 47 (1):161.
     
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  19.  72
    Technical Mentality” Revisited: Brian Massumi on Gilbert Simondon.Brian Massumi - 2009 - Parrhesia 7:36-45.
  20. Book Review: Brian Wicker and Hugh Beach , Britain's Bomb: What Next? . Xii + 212 Pp. £12.99 , ISBN 978—0—334—04096—5. [REVIEW]Brian Stiltner - 2007 - Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (3):446-448.
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  21.  31
    Reconciling Reason and Religion: A Response to Peels: Brian Zamulinski.Brian Zamulinski - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (1):109-113.
    In ‘The ethics of belief and Christian faith as commitment to assumptions’, Rik Peels attacks the views that I advanced in ‘Christianity and the ethics of belief’. Here, I rebut his criticisms of the claim that it is wrong to believe without sufficient evidence, of the contention that Christians are committed to that claim, and of the notion of that faith is not belief but commitment to assumptions in the hope of salvation. My original conclusions still stand.
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  22. Bertrand Russell an Introduction; Edited Selections From His Writings [by] Brian Carr. --.Bertrand Russell & Brian Carr - 1975 - Allen & Unwin.
     
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  23.  22
    The Morality of War.Brian Orend - 2006 - Broadview Press.
    "Brian Orend's The Morality of War promises to become the single most comprehensive and important book on just war for this generation. It moves far beyond the review of the standard just war categories to deal comprehensively with the new challenges of the conflict with terrorism. It thoughtfully reviews every major military conflict of the past few decades, mining them for implications of the evolving tradition of just war thinking. It concludes with a critical engagement with the major alternatives (...)
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  24. God and Necessity.Brian Leftow - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Modal basics -- Some solutions -- Theist solutions -- The ontology of possibility -- Modal truthmakers -- Modality and the divine nature -- Deity as essential -- Against deity theories -- The role of deity -- The biggest bang -- Divine concepts -- Concepts, syntax, and actualism -- Modality: basic notions -- The genesis of secular modality -- Modal reality -- Essences -- Non-secular modalities -- Theism and modal semantics -- Freedom, preference, and cost -- Explaining modal status -- Explaining (...)
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  25. The Worst Enemy of Science?: Essays in Memory of Paul Feyerabend.John Preston, Gonzalo Munévar & David Lamb (eds.) - 2000 - Oup Usa.
    This stimulating collection is devoted to the life and work of the most flamboyant of twentieth-century philosophers, Paul Feyerabend. Feyerabend's radical epistemological claims, and his stunning argument that there is no such thing as scientific method, were highly influential during his life and have only gained attention since his death in 1994. The essays that make up this volume, written by some of today's most respected philosophers of science, many of whom knew Feyerabend as students and colleagues, cover the diverse (...)
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  26.  45
    Review of Forrest Clingerman, Brian Treanor, Martin Drenthen and David Utsler , Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics[REVIEW]Brian Onishi - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (5):695-697.
  27.  36
    Providence and Divine Action: BRIAN L.HEBBLETHWAITE.Brian L. Hebblethwaite - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):223-236.
    In the preface to his book God the Problem , Gordon Kaufman writes ‘Although the notion of God as agent seems presupposed by most contemporary theologians … Austin Farrer has been almost alone in trying to specify carefully and consistently just what this might be understood to mean.’.
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  28. What Matters in Psychological Continuity? Using Meditative Traditions to Identify Biases in Intuitions About Personal Persistence.Preston Greene & Meghan Sullivan - forthcoming - In Kevin Tobia (ed.), Experimental Philosophy of Identity and the Self. London:
  29.  81
    Brian Boyd Responds:.Brian Boyd - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):196-199.
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  30. Hedonic and Non-Hedonic Bias Toward the Future.Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):148-163.
    It has widely been assumed, by philosophers, that our first-person preferences regarding pleasurable and painful experiences exhibit a bias toward the future (positive and negative hedonic future-bias), and that our preferences regarding non-hedonic events (both positive and negative) exhibit no such bias (non-hedonic time-neutrality). Further, it has been assumed that our third-person preferences are always time-neutral. Some have attempted to use these (presumed) differential patterns of future-bias—different across kinds of events and perspectives—to argue for the irrationality of hedonic future-bias. This (...)
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  31.  66
    Review of Thomas Aquinas, Brian Shanley, The Treatise on the Divine Nature, Summa Theologiae I, 1-13[REVIEW]Brian Davies - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (6).
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  32.  64
    A User's Guide to Capitalism and Schizophrenia: Deviations From Deleuze and Guattari.Brian Massumi - 1992 - MIT Press.
    A User's Guide to Capitalism and Schizophrenia is a playful and emphatically practical elaboration of the major collaborative work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. When read along with its rigorous textual notes, the book also becomes the richest scholarly treatment of Deleuze's entire philosophical oeuvre available in any language. Finally, the dozens of explicit examples that Brian Massumi furnishes from contemporary artistic, scientific, and popular urban culture make the book an important, perhaps even central text (...)
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  33.  37
    Review of Brian Hebblethwaite, Philosophical Theology and Christian Doctrine[REVIEW]Brian Davies - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (1).
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  34. The Role of Naturalness in Lewis's Theory of Meaning.Brian Weatherson - 2013 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (10).
    Many writers have held that in his later work, David Lewis adopted a theory of predicate meaning such that the meaning of a predicate is the most natural property that is (mostly) consistent with the way the predicate is used. That orthodox interpretation is shared by both supporters and critics of Lewis's theory of meaning, but it has recently been strongly criticised by Wolfgang Schwarz. In this paper, I accept many of Schwarze's criticisms of the orthodox interpretation, and add some (...)
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  35.  31
    Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2002/2014 - Routledge.
    Both an introduction to Nietzsche’s moral philosophy, and a sustained commentary on his most famous work, On the Genealogy of Morality, this book has become the most widely used and debated secondary source on these topics over the past dozen years. Many of Nietzsche’s most famous ideas - the "slave revolt" in morals, the attack on free will, perspectivism, "will to power" and the "ascetic ideal" - are clearly analyzed and explained. The first edition established the centrality of naturalism to (...)
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  36. Of Conspiracy Theories.Brian L. Keeley - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):109-126.
    As the end of the Millennium approaches, conspiracy theories are increasing in number and popularity. In this short essay, I offer an analysis of conspiracy theories inspired by Hume's discussion of miracles. My first conclusion is that whereas Hume can argue that miracles are, by definition, explanations we are not warranted in believing, there is nothing analytic that will allow us to distinguish good from bad conspiracy theories. There is no a priori method for distinguishing warranted conspiracy theories (say, those (...)
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  37.  49
    Systematicity, Conceptual Truth, and Evolution*: Brian P. McLaughlin.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1993 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 34:217-234.
  38.  42
    An Interview With Professor Brian Barry.Brian Bany - 1999 - Cogito 13 (2):77-85.
  39.  26
    Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston.Christopher J. Preston - 2007 - In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer. pp. 8.
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  40. Against Time Bias.Preston Greene & Meghan Sullivan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):947-970.
    Most of us display a bias toward the near: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our near future and painful experiences to be in our distant future. We also display a bias toward the future: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our future and painful experiences to be in our past. While philosophers have tended to think that near bias is a rational defect, almost no one finds future bias objectionable. In this essay, we argue that this hybrid (...)
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  41.  51
    Cognitive Phenomenology: In Defense of Recombination.Preston Lennon - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    The cognitive experience view of thought holds that the content of thought is determined by its cognitive-phenomenal character. Adam Pautz argues that the cognitive experience view is extensionally inadequate: it entails the possibility of mix-and-match cases, where the cognitive-phenomenal properties that determine thought content are combined with different sensory-phenomenal and functional properties. Because mix-and-match cases are metaphysically impossible, Pautz argues, the cognitive experience view should be rejected. This paper defends the cognitive experience view from Pautz’s argument. I build on resources (...)
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  42.  10
    Reparations to the Privileged?Brian Kogelmann - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  43.  36
    Two Trinities: Reply to Hasker: Brian Leftow.Brian Leftow - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (4):441-447.
    William Hasker replies to my arguments against Social Trinitarianism, offers some criticism of my own view, and begins a sketch of another account of the Trinity. I reply with some defence of my own theory and some questions about his.
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  44.  88
    Legal Formalism and Legal Realism: What is the Issue?: Brian Leiter.Brian Leiter - 2010 - Legal Theory 16 (2):111-133.
    In teaching jurisprudence, I typically distinguish between two different families of theories of adjudication—theories of how judges do or should decide cases. “Formalist” theories claim that the law is “rationally” determinate, that is, the class of legitimate legal reasons available for a judge to offer in support of his or her decision justifies one and only one outcome either in all cases or in some significant and contested range of cases ; and adjudication is thus “autonomous” from other kinds of (...)
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  45. What Functions Explain: Functional Explanation and Self-Reproducing Systems.Beth Preston - 2002 - Mind 111 (444):888-891.
  46. On Preferring That Overall, Things Are Worse: Future‐Bias and Unequal Payoffs.Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Wiley: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophers working on time-biases assume that people are hedonically biased toward the future. A hedonically future-biased agent prefers pleasurable experiences to be future instead of past, and painful experiences to be past instead of future. Philosophers further predict that this bias is strong enough to apply to unequal payoffs: people often prefer less pleasurable future experiences to more pleasurable past ones, and more painful past experiences to less painful future ones. In addition, philosophers have predicted that future-bias is restricted to (...)
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  47.  45
    The Real-Life Issue of Prepunishment.Preston Greene - 2022 - Social Theory and Practice 48 (3):507-523.
    When someone is prepunished, they are punished for a predicted crime they will or would commit. I argue that cases of prepunishment universally assumed to be merely hypothetical—including those in Philip K. Dick’s “The Minority Report”— are equivalent to some instances of the real-life punishment of attempt offenses. This conclusion puts pressure in two directions. If prepunishment is morally impermissible, as philosophers argue, then this calls for amendments to criminal justice theory and practice. At the same time, if prepunishment is (...)
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  48. On the Matter of Robot Minds.Brian P. McLaughlin & David Rose - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy.
    The view that phenomenally conscious robots are on the horizon often rests on a certain philosophical view about consciousness, one we call “nomological behaviorism.” The view entails that, as a matter of nomological necessity, if a robot had exactly the same patterns of dispositions to peripheral behavior as a phenomenally conscious being, then the robot would be phenomenally conscious; indeed it would have all and only the states of phenomenal consciousness that the phenomenally conscious being in question has. We experimentally (...)
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  49. Delusions and madmen: against rationality constraints on belief.Declan Smithies, Preston Lennon & Richard Samuels - 2022 - Synthese 200 (3):1-30.
    According to the Rationality Constraint, our concept of belief imposes limits on how much irrationality is compatible with having beliefs at all. We argue that empirical evidence of human irrationality from the psychology of reasoning and the psychopathology of delusion undermines only the most demanding versions of the Rationality Constraint, which require perfect rationality as a condition for having beliefs. The empirical evidence poses no threat to more relaxed versions of the Rationality Constraint, which only require only minimal rationality. Nevertheless, (...)
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  50. Success-First Decision Theories.Preston Greene - 2018 - In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Newcomb's Problem. Cambridge University Press. pp. 115–137.
    The standard formulation of Newcomb's problem compares evidential and causal conceptions of expected utility, with those maximizing evidential expected utility tending to end up far richer. Thus, in a world in which agents face Newcomb problems, the evidential decision theorist might ask the causal decision theorist: "if you're so smart, why ain’cha rich?” Ultimately, however, the expected riches of evidential decision theorists in Newcomb problems do not vindicate their theory, because their success does not generalize. Consider a theory that allows (...)
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