Results for 'British Idealism In Southern'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. The impact of idealism in north America.British Idealism In Southern - 2010 - In William Sweet (ed.), Biographical Encyclopedia of British Idealism. New York: Continuum. pp. 20.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  6
    Biographical Encyclopedia of British Idealism (review).Karim Dharamsi - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):146-147.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Biographical Encyclopedia of British IdealismKarim DharamsiWilliam Sweet, editor. Biographical Encyclopedia of British Idealism. New York-London: Continuum, 2010. Pp. xx + 724. Cloth, $295.00.The term ‘British Idealism’ underdetermines the interests and geographies of philosophers classed under its heading. It may imply a common goal or, indeed, location. This is misleading. The Biographical Encyclopedia of British Idealism goes a long way in demonstrating (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  8
    British Idealism.James Connelly & Giuseppina D'Oro - 2019 - In John Shand (ed.), A Companion to Nineteenth Century Philosophy (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 365–388.
    This chapter identifies some themes in British idealism, especially those which resonate in contemporary debates, through an examination of T.H. Green, F.H. Bradley and J.M.E. McTaggart. It focuses primarily on metaphysics and epistemology, supplemented by discussion of the ethics of Green and Bradley. In characterizing British idealism in more detail, it is important to start with T.H. Green, whose importance lay both in his philosophical thought, and also in his active engagement with Oxford local politics, educational (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Ancestors, legacies and traditions: British Idealism in the history of political thought.John Morrow - 1985 - History of Political Thought 6 (3):491.
  5.  2
    British idealism, and social explanation: a study in late Victorian thought.Sandra M. Den Otter - 1996 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Idealism became the dominant philosphical school of thought in late nineteenth-century Britain. In this original and stimulating study, Sandra den Otter examines its roots in Greek and German thinking and locates it among the prevalent methodologies and theories of the period: empiricism and positivism, naturalism, evolution, and utilitarianism. In particular, she sets it in the context of the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century debate about a science of society and the contemporary preoccupation with `community'.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  2
    Unpublished manuscripts in British idealism: political philosophy, theology and social thought.Colin Tyler (ed.) - 2005 - Bristol: Thoemmes Continuum.
    The British Idealist movement flourished between the 1860s and 1920s and exerted a very significant influence in the USA, India and Canada, most notably on John Dewey and Josiah Royce. The movement also laid the groundwork for the thought of Oakeshott and Collingwood. Its leading figures – particularly Green and Caird – have left a number of complete or near complete manuscripts in various British university archives, many of which remain unpublished. This important collection widens access to this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  3
    British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought.Sandra M. Den Otter - 1996 - New York: Clarendon Press.
    In this original and stimulating study of Idealism, the dominant philosophical school of thought in late nineteenth-century Britain, Sandra den Otter interweaves philosophical and sociological concerns to make an important contribution to intellectual history.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  8
    British Idealist Monadologies and the Reality of Time: Hilda Oakeley Against McTaggart, Leibniz, and Others.Emily Thomas - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1150-1168.
    In the early twentieth century, a rare strain of British idealism emerged which took Leibniz's Monadology as its starting point. This paper discusses a variant of that strain, offered by Hilda Oakeley. I set Oakeley's monadology in its philosophical context and discuss a key point of conflict between Oakeley and her fellow monadologists: the unreality of time. Oakeley argues that time is fundamentally real, a thesis arguably denied by Leibniz and subsequent monadologists, and by all other British (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  1
    The British Idealists.David Boucher - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    The British idealists made significant and lasting contributions to the social and political thought of the nineteenth century. They contributed to the evolution debate in insisting that the social organism could not be understood in naturalistic terms, but instead had to be conceived as an evolving spiritual unity. In this respect the British idealists developed a distinctive view of the state constitutive of the individual and they are commonly acknowledged as the forerunners of modern communitarian theory. Furthermore the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  32
    Hegel, british idealism, and the curious case of the concrete universal.Robert Stern - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):115 – 153.
    [INTRODUCTION] Like the terms 'dialectic', 'Aufhebung' (or 'sublation'), and 'Geist', the term 'concrete universal' has a distinctively Hegelian ring to it. But unlike these others, it is particularly associated with the British strand in Hegel's reception history, as having been brought to prominence by some of the central British Idealists. It is therefore perhaps inevitable that, as their star has waned, so too has any use of the term, while an appreciation of the problematic that lay behind it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  11.  6
    British Idealism.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    British idealism flourished in the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. It was a movement with a lasting influence on the social and political thought of its time in particular. British idealists helped popularize the work of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel in the Anglophone world, but they also sought to use insights from the philosophies of Kant and Hegel to help create a new idealism to address the many pressing issues of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  4
    British Idealism and the Human Rights Culture.David Boucher - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):61-78.
    Despite the fact that by the end of the nineteenth century philosophically Natural Rights had been severely undermined, and that the British Idealists found anathema most of the principles upon which they relied, such theories still had a currency among some political polemicists. The Idealists retained the vocabulary and transformed the meaning to refer to those rights which it is imperative that the state or society recognise as indispensable to social existence. The criterion of such necessity was their contribution (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  10
    British idealism and the concept of the self: edited by William Mander and Stamatoula Panagakou, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, pp. 335, $109.99 (hb), ISBN: 978-1-137-46670-9.Damian Ilodigwe - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (6):1256-1261.
    W. J. Mander and Stamatoula Panagakou’s book is one of the latest expressions of the resurgence of British Idealism after its demotion in British philosophy as a result of the ascendancy of analyti...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  4
    British Idealism and the Concept of the Self ed. by William J. Mander and Stamatoula Panagakou.Pierfrancesco Basile - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):564-565.
    According to the editors of this book, “The history of philosophy as taught today is a highly selective activity. In its determination to tell a particular story, it passes over in silence large swathes of otherwise interesting philosophical work”. This claim would have been worthy of serious consideration had it been made a few decades ago—that is to say, at a time when analytic philosophy was a clearly recognizable philosophical movement. The “particular story” according to which the works of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  69
    Samuel Alexander's Early Reactions to British Idealism.A. R. J. Fisher - 2017 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 23 (2):169-196.
    Samuel Alexander was a central figure of the new wave of realism that swept across the English-speaking world in the early twentieth century. His Space, Time, and Deity (1920a, 1920b) was taken to be the official statement of realism as a metaphysical system. But many historians of philosophy are quick to point out the idealist streak in Alexander’s thought. After all, as a student he was trained at Oxford in the late 1870s and early 1880s as British Idealism (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  4
    The Creation of a British Idealist Circle in the Wake of T.H. Green's Courses at Balliol College, Oxford, in the 1870s.J.-P. Rosaye - 2018 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 24 (2):301-320.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  8
    New conceptions of transcendence in the thought of the British idealists.William J. Mander - 2017 - History of European Ideas 43 (3):241-250.
    ABSTRACTBritish Idealism was the philosophical school which dominated during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Using the ideas of Bernard Bosanquet, John Caird and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison as an illustration, this paper looks at some of the ways in which the British Idealists sought to develop new and more subtle conceptions of the transcendent, able to resist the corrosive effects of late nineteenth-century critical and naturalistic thinking. The paper concludes by looking at three fields – philosophy, theology (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  4
    British idealist ethics.W. J. Mander - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    A new moral philosophy emerged on the British philosophical scene in the late 1870s, one referred to as the idealist ethic of social self-realization, which rapidly became the dominant mode of moral thought for over twenty years. This chapter discusses the views of the pioneers of idealist ethics, F. H. Bradley and T. H. Green.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  11
    The Philosophy of History of the British Idealists: Preliminary Observations.J. Karabelas - 2018 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 24 (1):71-89.
    British idealism is usually regarded as having been, in the main, indifferent to the problems of the philosophy of history. The interest in the philosophy of history found in German, and later in Italian, idealism was allegedly not shared by the early generations of the British idealists. At best they are regarded as unwitting precursors of things to come, some of their reflections paving the way for subsequent advances in historical thinking. The British idealists, however, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  10
    ‘Sane’ and ‘insane’ imperialism: British idealism, new liberalism and liberal imperialism.David Boucher - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (8):1189-1204.
    ABSTRACTIt is contended that British Idealists, New Liberals and Liberal Imperialists were all in favour of imperialism, especially when it took the form of white settler communities. The concession of relative autonomy was an acknowledgement of the potential of white settler communities to go the way of America by severing their relationship with the Empire completely. Where significant differences emerge in their thinking is in relation to non-white territories in the Empire where native peoples comprised the majority, and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  2
    The British Idealists. [REVIEW]Michael Forest - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):431-431.
    The British Idealists were a force to be reckoned with in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, until they appeared as the philosophical casualty of the Great War. This volume, part of the Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought, reproduces selections dealing with social and political philosophy from ten different authors of that tradition. Leading political theorist Bernard Bosanquet has three separate selections totaling fifty-three pages. T. H. Green has only one passage included here since there exists (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  4
    The British Idealists on Disjunction.David J. Crossley - 1978 - Idealistic Studies 8 (2):115-123.
    In truth-functional analysis we need not worry about the purported ambiguity of the English ‘or,’ for we can assign different symbols and define each by means of a truth table. However, at least in classes in elementary logic, we often try to indicate that there is some rationale to the assignation of truth values by marshaling English disjunctive sentences which will clearly render an inclusive or an exclusive reading, without the explicit addition of one of the qualifying phrases, “or both” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  7
    Idealism in modern philosophy.J. Paul Guyer - 2023 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Rolf-Peter Horstmann.
    This book tells the story of idealism in modern philosophy, from the seventeenth century to the turn of the twenty-first. Paul Guyer and Rolf-Peter Horstmann define idealism as the reduction of all reality to something mental in nature. Rather than distinguishing between metaphysical and epistemological versions of idealism, they distinguish between metaphysical and epistemological motivations for idealism. They argue that while metaphysical arguments for idealism have only rarely been accepted, for example by Bishop Berkeley in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  5
    British Idealism and its Empire.William Sweet - 2011 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (1):7-36.
    It is generally acknowledged that the British Idealism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries had a significant influence in the philosophy, politics, and culture of that country. In this study, I argue that it also had a considerable impact throughout much of the English-speaking world, and beyond -- in Canada, Australia, the United States, South Africa, India, and even East Asia. This idealism engaged 'local' philosophical traditions and culture, contributed to them, and sometimes led to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  12
    British Idealist Aesthetics, Collingwood, Wollheim, And The Origins Of Analytic Aesthetics.Chinatsu Kobayashi - 2008 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4:12.
    In particular, as we shall see, Collingwood is often dismissed as having held an indefensible, outmoded ‘ideal’ theory, according to which the work of art is primarily ‘mental’, while his potential role in current debates is simply ignored. I will argue that this view is largely mistaken.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  12
    British idealism and evolution.David Boucher - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    The degree to which British Idealists, both Absolutists and Personalists, were influenced by evolutionary debates has been underestimated, and far from being outright opponents they developed their own particular brand in order to demonstrate the relevance of their philosophies to addressing the important issues of the day. They were opposed to naturalism, but agreed with the likes of Darwin and Spencer that nature and spirit exhibit a continuity. Where they disagreed was in the naturalistic emphasis of giving priority to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  4
    William Mander & Stamatoula Panagakou , British Idealism and the Concept of the Self. Reviewed by.James Pearce - 2018 - Philosophy in Review 38 (2):65-66.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  6
    Justice as a secondary moral ideal: The British idealists and the personal ethics perspective in understanding social justice.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2011 - European Journal of Political Theory 10 (1):46-70.
    This paper aims to show the advantages of the personal ethics perspective employed by the British idealists in the analysis of justice. In the context of Green’s and Bosanquet’s political theory, justice is a secondary moral ideal. Yet, it is argued here, their moral philosophy leads us, through a longer path, to the philosophical grounds we already occupy today: those of thinking about human rights as fundamental, not derivative, i.e. thinking about justice as a primary, not secondary moral ideal. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  12
    Language, aesthetics and emotions in the work of the British idealists.Colin Tyler & James Connelly - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):643-659.
    ABSTRACTThis article surveys and contextualizes the British idealists’ philosophical writings on language, aesthetics and emotions, starting with T. H. Green and concluding with Michael Oakeshott. It highlights ways in which their philosophical insights have been wrongly overlooked by later writers. It explores R. L. Nettleship’s posthumous publications in this field and notes that they exerted significant influences on British idealists and closely related figures, such as Bernard Bosanquet and R. G. Collingwood. The writing of other figures are also (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  11
    British idealism and the human rights culture.David Boucher - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):61-78.
    Despite the fact that by the end of the nineteenth century philosophically Natural Rights had been severely undermined, and that the British Idealists found anathema most of the principles upon which they relied, such theories still had a currency among some political polemicists. The Idealists retained the vocabulary and transformed the meaning to refer to those rights which it is imperative that the state or society recognise as indispensable to social existence. The criterion of such necessity was their contribution (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. British Idealist Philosophy of Religion.William Sweet - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter presents the major figures of British idealism who wrote on religion, identifies and discusses some of the dominant themes in their work, and discusses how they engaged in, or contributed to, a philosophy of religion. It is argued that there is a development in reflection on religion in idealist thought in Britain in the 19th century: from a first generation, including J.F. Ferrier J.H. Stirling, and Benjamin Jowett, through a second generation, to a final phase: a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  3
    Biographical Encyclopedia of British Idealism.William Sweet (ed.) - 2010 - New York: Continuum.
    Often regarded as an aberrant phase in the history of late 19th and early 20th-century philosophy, British Idealism provoked a wide range of attacks and replies from all the major figures of the time, such as Sidgwick, Dewey, Broad and Russell. This work reflects the shifting intellectual boundaries of British Thought between 1860 and 1920.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  3
    Moral, Social and Political Philosophy of the British Idealists.William Sweet (ed.) - 2009 - Imprint Academic.
    The British idealists of the late 19th and early 20th century are best known for their contributions to metaphysics, logic, and political philosophy. Yet they also made important contributions to social and public policy, social and moral philosophy and moral education, as shown by this volume. Their views are not only important in their own right, but also bear on contemporary discussion in public policy and applied ethics. Among the authors discussed are Green, Caird, Ritchie, Bradley, Bosanquet, Jones, McTaggart, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  8
    What did the British Idealists do for Us?Thom Brooks - 2011 - In New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 28--47.
    Perhaps one of the most underappreciated philosophical movements is British Idealism. This movement arose during the latter half of the nineteenth century and began to wane after the outbreak of the First World War. British Idealism has produced a number of important figures, such as Bernard Bosanquet, R. G. Collingwood, F. H. Bradley and T. H. Green, as well as other important, but less well known, figures, such as J. S. Mackenzie, John Henry Muirhead and James (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  6
    J. A. Smith, Human Imperfection and the Strange Afterlife of British Idealism.Adrian Paylor - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (6):771-787.
    SummaryThe purpose of this article is to critically undermine two commonly held and closely related contentions regarding the British idealist tradition. The first is that the British idealist tradition went into rapid and terminal decline shortly after the outbreak of the First World War. The second is that J. A. Smith was largely responsible for it. These aims are achieved through a diachronic analysis of Smith's conception of human imperfection as well as an assessment of Smith's intellectual legacy. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  34
    The general will and the speech community: British Idealism and the foundations of politics.Janusz Grygieńć - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (4):660-680.
    ABSTRACTAlthough the British Idealists did not provide a systematic account of language as a distinct philosophical phenomenon, language is nonetheless a fundamental element of Idealist social and political philosophy. This is seen mostly in the Idealist treatment of the concept of general will, which resulted in a Hegelian theory of community, constituted by shared understandings and a shared account of the common good and common interest. This article contains analysis of the relations between language and socio-political institutions in (...) Idealist writings. The narrative focuses on Thomas Hill Green and Bernard Bosanquet – two major political thinkers representing the said philosophical tradition. The argument proceeds as follows: firstly, possible linguistic interpretations of the Idealist philosophical tradition are introduced. Then the author turns to Green’s conception of general will as the foundation of socio-political order and political sovereignty. In the third section, he... (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  16
    The strange death of british idealism.Edward Skidelsky - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):41-51.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Strange Death of British IdealismEdward SkidelskyIIn 1958, the Oxford philosopher G. J. Warnock opened his survey of twentieth-century English philosophy with some disparaging comments on British Idealism. It was, he writes, "an exotic in the English scene, the product of a quite recent revolution in ways of thought due primarily to German influences." Analytic philosophy, by contrast, represents a return to the venerable lineage of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  5
    Evolutionary theory and British idealism: the case of David George Ritchie.E. Neill - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (3):313-338.
    This article investigates the relationship between two influential intellectual schools in late 19th century Britain, namely social evolutionary theories and British Idealism, by focusing on the work of D.G. Ritchie who drew inspiration from both sources. In particular, it argues that Ritchie's work can best be understood as an attempt to overcome certain metaphysical problems in the work of his teacher, T.H. Green, by integrating an Idealist account of social development with a Darwinian one, and analyses the effects (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    The British Idealists. [REVIEW]Stamatoula Panagakou - 2000 - Bradley Studies 6 (1):125-132.
    The growing interest in the philosophy of the British Idealists required a comprehensive and accessible volume containing an anthology of their work. Boucher’s book, with its special emphasis on the moral, social and political philosophy of British Idealism, fills a gap in the existing literature and provides readers with the insights of such philosophers as Edward Caird, T. H. Green, F. H. Bradley, John Watson, Bernard Bosanquet, Henry Jones, D. G. Ritchie, J.H. Muirhead, Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  10
    “All history is the history of thought”: competing British idealist historiographies.Colin Tyler - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (3):573-593.
    Along with utilitarianism, British idealism was the most important philosophical and practical movement in Britain and its Empire during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Even though the British idealists have regained some of their standing in the history of philosophy, their own historical theories still fail to receive the deserved scholarly attention. This article helps to fill that major gap in the literature. Understanding historiography as concerning the appropriate modes of enquiring into the recorded past, this article (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Scottish Contribution to British Idealism and the Reception of Hegel.David Boucher - 2015 - In Gordon Graham (ed.), Scottish Philosophy in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  7
    Resolving moral conflicts : British idealist and contemporary liberal approaches to value pluralism and moral conduct.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.), T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Ethics of British Idealism.Andrew Vincent - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    One of the most well-known dimensions of British idealist philosophy concerns its understanding of ethics. The three philosophers who will be examined here are F.H Bradley, T.H. Green and Bernard Bosanquet. The key treatises on ethics for the British Idealists, between the 1870s and the 1920s, were largely Bradley’s Ethical Studies and Green’s Prolegomena to Ethics. Other Idealist philosophers, such as Bosanquet, J.H. Muirhead and J.S. Mackenzie, also wrote more synoptic works on ethics, but the former works by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  5
    Bernard Bosanquet and the legacy of british idealism (review).Denys P. Leighton - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 320-321.
    In recent years "British" Idealism has been subject to sweeping re-evaluation and rehabilitation. The essays collected here by Will Sweet compare Bernard Bosanquet's ideas and arguments with those of Idealists and non-Idealists alike, and establish that Bosanquet was far more clear-headed and insightful than denunciations of the "Idealist school" by Moore, Russell, C. D. Broad, Harold Prichard, and A. J. Ayer suggest. Sweet observes in his introduction that Bosanquet has long remained in the shadows of T. H. Green (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. ch. 28. British idealist philosophy of religion.William Sweet - 2014 - In W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  2
    Hegel and British Idealism.W. J. Mander - 2013 - In Lisa Herzog (ed.), Hegel's Thought in Europe: Currents, Crosscurrents and Undercurrents. Palgrave. pp. 165.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. David Boucher, ed., The British Idealists Reviewed by.William Sweet - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (6):393-396.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  9
    Some Aspects of the Treatment of Christianity by the British Idealists.D. M. Mackinnon - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (1):133 - 144.
    It was in December 1868, a little less than fifteen years before his death, that T. H. Green entered into correspondence with the young Henry Scott Holland and R. L. Nettleship on the occasion of the latter's visit to the young Gerard Manley Hopkins, then on the threshold of entering the novitiate of the Society of Jesus. Part of this correspondence is preserved in Stephen Paget's memoir of Scott Holland, and no student of the interpretation of Christianity in the writings (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  11
    Freedom and idealism in Mary Whiton Calkins.Kris McDaniel - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (3):573-592.
    This paper explores Calkins’ absolute idealism and its ramifications for libertarian free will. Calkins’ metaphysics is a version of absolute idealism, according to which the absolute is a person who has everything else as either a part or an aspect. Three different arguments for the conclusion that Calkins’ metaphysics is incompatible with libertarian freewill are formulated and critically assessed. Finally, I assess the extent to which these arguments are independent of each other.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  12
    The Christologies of Kant and the British Idealists: Ethical and Ontological Theories of Kenosis.Ralph Norman - 2013 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):113-137.
    In Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (6: 61), Kant provided an ethical interpretation of kenosis, the 'self-emptying' of Christ described by St Paul in Philippians 2: 6-8. This type of interpretation is distinct to Hegelian interpretations of Christ's kenosis, which read the 'self-emptying' in ontological terms. In this essay, I explore how the British Idealists received both interpretations of the doctrine, and constructed a range of Christologies of both types. Types of kenosis in the work of Thomas (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000