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Bruce Young [3]Bruce W. Young [1]Bruce A. Young [1]
  1.  39
    On the Necessity of an Archetypal Concept in Morphology: With Special Reference to the Concepts of “Structure” and “Homology”. [REVIEW]Bruce A. Young - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (2):225-248.
    Morphological elements, or structures, are sorted into four categories depending on their level of anatomical isolation and the presence or absence of intrinsically identifying characteristics. These four categories are used to highlight the difficulties with the concept of structure and our ability to identify or define structures. The analysis is extended to the concept of homology through a discussion of the methodological and philosophical problems of the current concept of homology. It is argued that homology is fundamentally a similarity based (...)
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  2.  13
    Beyond Personality: Cs Lewis'semi-Postmodern View of the Human Person.Bruce W. Young - 2012 - Appraisal 9 (1).
  3.  3
    The Key to Marx's Value Theory.Bruce Young - 1978 - New Blackfriars 59 (697):282-287.
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  4. Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader.Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young - 2005 - Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
     
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  5. Naturalism is Not Enough. [REVIEW]Bruce Young - 1972 - Radical Philosophy 1:28.
     
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