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Bryan K. Church [3]Bryan Church [2]
  1.  49
    Experimental Evidence Relating to the Person-Situation Interactionist Model of Ethical Decision Making.Church Bryan, C. Gaa James, Nainar S. M. Khalid & M. Shehata Mohamed - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):363-383.
    According to a widely credited model in the business ethics literature, ethical decisions are a function of two kinds of factors, personal(individual) and situational, and these factors interact with each other. According to a contrary view of decision making that is widely held in some areas of business research, individuals’ decisions about ethical issues (and subsequent actions) are purely a function of their self-interest.The laboratory experiment reported in this paper provides a test of the person-situation interactionist model, using the general (...)
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  2.  1
    Experimental Evidence Relating to the Person-Situation Interactionist Model of Ethical Decision Making.James C. Gaa, Bryan K. Church, Khalid Nainar & Mohamed Shehata - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):2013-155.
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  3.  15
    Experimental Evidence Relating to the Person-Situation Interactionist Model of Ethical Decision Making.Bryan Church, James C. Gaa, Sm Khalid Nainar & Mohamed M. Shehata - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3).
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  4.  45
    Lying.Lucy F. Ackert, Bryan K. Church, Xi Kuang & Li Qi - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):605-632.
    Individuals often lie for psychological rewards (e.g., preserving self image and/or protecting others), absent economic rewards. We conducted a laboratory experiment, using a modified dictator game, to identify conditions that entice individuals to lie solely for psychological rewards. We argue that such lies can provide a ready means for individuals to manage others’ impression of them. We investigated the effect of social distance (the perceived familiarity, intimacy, or psychological proximity between two parties) and knowledge of circumstances (whether parties have common (...)
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