Results for 'Buddha'

712 found
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  1.  4
    Donald Rothberg.Gautama Buddha - 2000 - In Tobin Hart, Peter L. Nelson & Kaisa Puhakka (eds.), Transpersonal Knowing: Exploring the Horizon of Consciousness. State University of New York Press. pp. 161.
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  2. Why the Buddha Did Not Discuss "The Problem of Free Will and Determinism".Christopher W. Gowans - 2017 - In Rick Repetti (ed.), Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency? New York: Routledge. pp. 11-21.
    I argue that the Buddha did not discuss the free will and determinism problem because he only considered issues relating to overcoming suffering and his teaching about this did not raise the problem. As represented in the Nikāyas, the heart of his teaching was an empirically based account of the causes of suffering and how to modify these to end suffering. It was primarily a practical teaching about how to achieve this goal, more a craft knowledge than a philosophical (...)
     
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  3.  66
    To See the Buddha: A Philosopher's Quest for the Meaning of Emptiness.Malcolm David Eckel - 1994 - Princeton University Press.
    Malcolm David Eckel takes us on a contemporary quest to discover the essential meaning behind the Buddha's many representations. Eckel's bold thesis proposes that the proper understanding of Buddhist philosophy must be thoroughly religious--an understanding revealed in Eckel's new translation of the philospher Bhavaviveka's major work, The Flame of Reason. Eckel shows that the dimensions of early Indian Buddhism--popular art, conventional piety, and critical philosophy--all work together to express the same religious yearning for the fullness of emptiness that (...) conveys. (shrink)
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  4.  25
    Reburying the Treasure—Maintaining the Continuity: Two Texts by Śākya Mchog Ldan on the Buddha-Essence. [REVIEW]Yaroslav Komarovski - 2006 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (6):521-570.
    The rich and interconnected universe of Śākya Mchog Ldan’s views, including those on the buddha-essence, cannot be limited to or summarized in a few neat categories. Nevertheless, the following two interrelated ideas are crucial for understanding Śākya Mchog Ldan’s interpretation of the buddha-essence: 1) only Mahāyāna āryas (’phags pa) have the buddha-essence characterized by the purity from adventitious stains (glo bur rnam dag).
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  5.  7
    The Buddha's Middle Way: Experiential Judgement in His Life and Teaching.Robert Michael Ellis - 2019 - Sheffield, UK: Equinox.
    The Middle Way was first taught explicitly by the Buddha. It is the first teaching offered by the Buddha in his first address, and the basis of his practical method in meditation, ethics, and wisdom. It is often mentioned in connection with Buddhist teachings, yet the full case for its importance has not yet been made. This book aims to make that case. -/- The Middle Way can be understood from the Buddha's life and metaphors as well (...)
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  6.  55
    The Doctrine of the Buddha, the Religion of Reason and Meditation.George Grimm - 1958 - Berlin, Akademie-Verlag.
    The book deals with Truth as the theme and basis of the doctrine of the Buddha.
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  7. Dao Must Flow Freely—The De-Substantialization of Buddha Nature in Huineng Chan.Youru Wang - 2006 - International Journal for Field-Being 5 (1).
  8. Die Weisheit des Buddha.Helmuth von Glasenapp - 1946 - H. Bühler, Jr.
     
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  9.  28
    The Scientific Buddha: His Short and Happy Life.Donald S. Lopez - 2012 - Yale University Press.
    A Purified Religion -- The Birth of the Scientific Buddha -- The Problem with Karma -- Interlude: A Primer on Buddhist Meditation -- The Death of the Scientific Buddha.
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  10.  13
    What Kind of Free Will Did the Buddha Teach?Asaf Federman - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:29-37.
    Recently, some contradictory statements have been made concerning whether or not the Buddha taught free will. Here, a comparative method is used to examine what exactly is meant by free will, and to determine to what extent this meaning is applicable to early Buddhist thought as recorded in the Pāli Nikāyas. The comparative method reveals parallels between contemporary criticisms of Cartesian philosophy and Buddhist criticisms of Brahmanical and Jain doctrines. Although in Cartesian terms Buddhism promotes no recognizable theory of (...)
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  11.  91
    What Kind of Free Will Did the Buddha Teach?Asaf Federman - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 1-19.
    Recently, some contradictory statements have been made concerning whether or not the Buddha taught free will. Here, a comparative method is used to examine what exactly is meant by free will, and to determine to what extent this meaning is applicable to early Buddhist thought as recorded in the Pāli Nikāyas. The comparative method reveals parallels between contemporary criticisms of Cartesian philosophy and Buddhist criticisms of Brahmanical and Jain doctrines. Although in Cartesian terms Buddhism promotes no recognizable theory of (...)
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  12.  72
    Philosophy of the Buddha: An Introduction.Christopher W. Gowans - 2003 - Routledge.
    Philosophy of the Buddha is a philosophical introduction to the teaching of the Buddha. It carefully guides readers through the basic ideas and practices of the Buddha, including kamma , rebirth, the not-self doctrine, the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, ethics, meditation, non-attachment, and Nibbâna . The book includes an account of the life of the Buddha as well as comparisons of his teaching with practical and theoretical aspects of some Western philosophical outlooks, both ancient (...)
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  13.  64
    The Contemporary Relevance of Buddha.Amartya Sen - 2014 - Ethics and International Affairs 28 (1):15-27.
    The great poet and novelist Rabindranath Tagore once remarked that he was extremely sad that he was not alive when Gautama Buddha was still around. Tagore very much wished he could have had conversations with Buddha. I share that sentiment, but, like Rabindranath, I am also immensely grateful that, even now, we can enjoy—and learn from—the ideas and arguments that Buddha gave us twenty-five hundred years ago. Our world may be very different from what Buddha faced (...)
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  14.  10
    The Nirvāṇa of the Buddha and the Afterlife of Aśvaghoṣa’s Life of the Buddha.Shenghai Li - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):361-382.
    Aśvaghoṣa follows his scriptural sources closely in his narration of the story of the Buddha’s last journey leading to his nirvāṇa. The Buddhacarita and the Pāli Mahāparinibbānasutta mirror each other in their accounts of most of the places that the Buddha visited and the many events that took place during that journey. What the Buddhacarita and the Pāli sutta have in common also suggests that Aśvaghoṣa’s sources are already highly literary, even though the Buddhist poet transforms the traditional (...)
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  15.  17
    The Buddha’s Wordplays: The Rhetorical Function and Efficacy of Puns and Etymologizing in the Pali Canon.Paolo Visigalli - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (4):809-832.
    This essay explores selected examples of puns and etymologizing in the Pali canon. It argues that they do not solely serve a satirical intent, but are sophisticated rhetorical devices, skilfully employed by the Buddha to induce a reflective awareness in the listeners and persuade them into accepting his view. Their rhetorical function and efficacy is investigated, while foregrounding a new interpretation of the Aggaññasutta.
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  16. Dialogues with Death: The Last Days of Socrates and the Buddha.Matthew Dillon - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (4):525-558.
    A comparison of Plato's "Phaedo" and the "Mahāparanibbāna Sutta" of the Pāli Canon juxtaposes the character and teachings of Socrates and the Buddha as revealed by both texts, set just before their deaths. Discussed at length are similarities in technique (dialogue), personality (open-mindedness and compassion), and doctrine (especially regarding the purification of the soul over numerous lifetimes), as well as the subsequent development of Platonism and Buddhism after the deaths of the masters.
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  17. Rethinking the Buddha: Early Buddhist Philosophy as Meditative Perception.Eviatar Shulman - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    A cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy, the doctrine of the four noble truths maintains that life is replete with suffering, desire is the cause of suffering, nirvana is the end of suffering, and the way to nirvana is the eightfold noble path. Although the attribution of this seminal doctrine to the historical Buddha is ubiquitous, Rethinking the Buddha demonstrates through a careful examination of early Buddhist texts that he did not envision them in this way. Shulman traces the development (...)
     
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  18.  20
    Dōgen’s Idea of Buddha-Nature: Dynamism and Non-Referentiality.Rein Raud - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (1):1-14.
    Busshō, one of the central fascicles of Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō, is dedicated to the problematic of Buddha-nature, the understanding of which in Dōgen’s thought is fairly different from previous Buddhist philosophy, but concordant with his views on reality, time and person. The article will present a close reading of several passages of the fascicle with comment in order to argue that Dōgen’s understanding of Buddha-nature is not something that entities have, but a mode of how they are, neither in (...)
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  19.  41
    The Non-Modern Confronts the Modern: Dating the Buddha in Japan.James E. Ketelaar - 2006 - History and Theory 45 (4):62-79.
    This paper examines the emergence of a distinctly “modern” style of history and some of its uses as applied to Buddhism by Buddhist scholars within the early Meiji Period in Japan. After a discussion of the importance of “area studies” in the formation of conceptions germane to history as practiced in Japan, the paper proposes a new category of the “non-modern” as a means to counter the historiographical dominance of modern categories in the formation of the historical discipline, especially as (...)
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  20.  8
    Moving Meditation: P Aik Nam June’s TV Buddha and Its Zen Buddhist Aesthetic Meaning.Tae-Seung Lim - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (1):91-107.
    The aesthetic spirit in Paik Nam June’s video art, TV Buddha, originated in the aesthetics of Zen Buddhism, and the parameters that established Paik’s aesthetic comprised the indigenous Eastern aesthetic idea of dongjing 動靜. Yi 逸 is the paramount aesthetic in Zen Buddhism, suggesting the transcendence of preexisting tracks and conventions. Paik’s behavioral music, to which he was dedicated before pioneering video art in earnest, was related to yi in terms of the complete aspects of forms, themes, and so (...)
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  21.  4
    A Tree in Bloom or a Tree Stripped Bare: Ways of Seeing in Aśvaghoṣa’s Life of the Buddha.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):313-326.
    Both of Aśvaghoṣa’s poetical works conclude with somewhat apologetic statements regarding his use of kāvya to deliver the Buddha’s words. Previous studies of his work have often read these statements as empty rhetoric, designed to assuage the typically suspicious attitude of the Buddhist canon toward kāvya, which consists in language beatified through ornamentation for the sole purpose of pleasure. This paper suggests that we should take Aśvaghoṣa’s statements seriously, and that indeed his poetry can be understood as conducive for (...)
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  22.  46
    Nietzsche as ‘Europe’s Buddha’ and ‘Asia’s Superman’.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2008 - Sophia 47 (3):359-376.
    Nietzsche represents in an interesting way the well-worn Western approach to Asian philosophical and religious thinking: initial excitement, then neglect by appropriation, and swift rejection when found to be incompatible with one’s own tradition, whose roots are inexorably traced back to the ‘ancient’ Greeks. Yet, Nietzsche’s philosophical critique and methods - such as ‘perspectivism’ - offer an instructive route through which to better understand another tradition even if the sole purpose of this exercise is to perceive one’s own limitations through (...)
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  23.  14
    Neither Scythian nor Greek: A Response to Beckwith's Greek Buddha and Kuzminski's "Early Buddhism Reconsidered".Charles Goodman - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (3):984-1006.
    According to an intriguing Chinese narrative, Laozi, founder of Daoism, did not restrict his teaching activities to his own countrymen. After entrusting his Daodejing to Yin Xi, the Keeper of the Pass, Laozi traveled west into the wilderness. Perhaps with the aid of supernatural powers, Laozi reached India and began to teach. There he came to be known as the Buddha. In this way, the striking similarities between Daoism and Buddhism are the result of these two traditions having had (...)
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  24.  8
    Relics of the Buddha.John S. Strong - 2004 - Princeton University Press.
    The book is structured around the life story of the Buddha, starting with traditions about relics of previous buddhas and relics from the past lives of the Buddha Sakyamuni.
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  25.  51
    Review of Nietzsche, Buddha, Zarathustra: Eine West-Ost Konfiguration, by Michael Skowron. [REVIEW]Gereon Kopf - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):560-564.
    In Nietzsche, Buddha, Zarathustra: Eine West-Ost Konfiguration, Michael Skowron sets out to develop a comparative philosophy of "self-overcoming," "transformation," and "process" (p. 7). Skowron's main interest is to retrace Friedrich Nietzsche's "genealogical thinking back to where the Eastern and the Western way began their separate direction in order to unearth the only place where they can be unified in its original form." The goal of this project is "to uncover the religious and postreligious dimensions of his [Nietzsche's] thinking" (p. (...)
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  26.  43
    Parfit and the Buddha: Identity and Identification in Reasons and Persons.Robert Ellis - 2000 - Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):91-106.
    (2000). Parfit and the buddha: Identity and identification in reasons and persons. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 91-106. doi: 10.1080/14639940008573723.
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  27.  7
    Mapping Poteat on the Buddha and Zen.Milton R. Scarborough - 2018 - Tradition and Discovery 44 (2):32-46.
    Despite the fact that none of William H. Poteat’s former students on the Yale Conference email list recall ever having heard Poteat mention the Buddha or Buddhism, this article argues for a hitherto unnoticed and striking correspondence of thought between William H. Poteat, the Buddha, and Ch’an. Both the Buddha and Poteat bear closer analogies to physicians than to metaphysicians and their thought can be compared to a kind of philosophical therapy. While the Buddha’s diagnosis pinpoints (...)
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  28.  58
    God as Political Philosopher: Buddha's Challenge to Brahminism.K. Ilaiah - 2001 - Popular Prakashan.
    Ilaiah demystifies Buddha whom he sees as a man and not a god and as India's first social revolutionary.
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  29.  54
    The Silence of the Buddha.Zhihua Yao - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:289-298.
    The current paper reflects my own personal struggle between two different fields of my training and career: religious studies and philosophy. Scholars with training in religious studies are understandably less interested in philosophical issues and more interested in such issues as myth, ritual, practice, eschatology, and, in the case of Buddhism and other Indian religions, soteriology. I will mainly address the tension between soteriological and philosophical discourses. I do agree that philosophy, Eastern philosophy in particular, is a byproduct of religious (...)
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  30.  17
    Killing the Buddha: Towards a Heretical Philosophy of Learning.Viktor Johansson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):61-71.
    This article explores how different philosophical models and pictures of learning can become dogmatic and disguise other conceptions of learning. With reference to a passage from St. Paul, I give a sense of the dogmatic teleology that underpins philosophical assumptions about learning. The Pauline assumption is exemplified through a variety of models of learning as conceptualised by Israel Scheffler. In order to show how the Paulinian dogmatism can give rise to radically different pictures of learning, the article turns to St. (...)
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  31.  47
    The Psychic Power of Buddha in the Early Buddhism Community.Hye Young Won - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:287-288.
    The author of this paper aimed to understand the early Buddhism community in its entirety by examining the individual episodes in the "Mahavagga". There is a remarkable experience of the psychic power between the Buddha and the Brahmins. They are both aware of coming across of psychic forces that entered the way to the Buddhist Community. Using the brahmins mythology as a instrument for missionary work, the early Buddhism brings people close to Buddha's community. The Buddha visited (...)
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  32.  16
    Rethinking the Buddha: Early Buddhist Philosophy as Meditative Perception by Eviatar Shulman.David Nowakowski - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):283-288.
    Eviatar Shulman’s Rethinking the Buddha: Early Buddhist Philosophy as Meditative Perception offers an important reminder to take early Buddhist texts seriously as meaning what they say, with regard to the four noble truths, dependent origination, and selflessness. Shulman’s book ably makes this interpretive point, but is frustratingly unclear in its more general discussion of the relationship between philosophy and meditation. Shulman’s main thesis is that the four noble truths, as they are customarily taught today, are a...
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  33.  25
    Goedel, Nietzsche and Buddha.Hung-Yul So - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 13:105-111.
    Hawking, in his book, A Brief History of Time, concludes with a conditional remark: If we find a complete theory to explain the physical world, then we will come to understand God’s mind. With Goedel in mind, we can raise questions about the completeness of our scientific understanding and the nature of our understanding with regard to God’s mind. We need to ask about the higher order of our understanding when we move to knowing God’s mind. We go onto develop (...)
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  34. Hey, Buddha! Don't Think! Just Act! Reply to Finnigan.Jay L. Garfield - unknown
    Finnigan, in the course of a careful and astute discussion of the difficulties facing a Buddhist account of the moral agency of a buddha, develops a challenging critique of a proposal I made in Garfield. Much of what she says is dead on target, and I have learned much from her paper. But I have serious reservations about the central thrust both of her critique of my own thought and about her proposal for a positive account of a (...)’s enlightened action. Curiously, in another fine paper, Finnigan and her co-author have anticipated much of what I will say in reply. I will rely in part on that second paper in my reply to the essay that appears in this volume. (shrink)
     
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  35.  1
    Was Epicurus a Buddhist? An Examination and Critique of the Theories of Negative Happiness in Buddha and Epicurus.Adam Barkman - 2008 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 7 (2):287-294.
    Comparisons betw western philosophies are uncommon and this, among other things, hinders global philosophical discourse. Thus, in this essay I want to compare the philosophies of the Buddha and Epicurus for similarities, particular in regard to what I call "negative happiness." Once I have establish this, I want to give a brief critique of negative happiness, which subsequently amounts to a selective critique of Buddhism and Epicureanism.
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  36.  38
    Hey, Buddha! Don't Think! Just Act!—A Response to Bronwyn Finnigan.Jay L. Garfield - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):174-183.
    In the course of a careful and astute discussion of the difficulties facing a Buddhist account of the moral agency of a buddha, Bronwyn Finnigan develops a challenging critique of a proposal I made in a recent article (Garfield 2006). Much of what she says is dead on target, and I have learned much from her comment. But I have serious reservations about both the central thrust of her critique of my own thought and her proposal for a positive (...)
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  37.  17
    Philosophy of the Buddha[REVIEW]L. M. T. - 1959 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (2):354-354.
    A concise, popular introduction to Buddhism, this book presents Buddha's teaching: avoid "desiring too much and avoid desiring too much stopping of such desiring." After a preliminary exposition, the author proceeds to examine the causes for various misinterpretations of Buddha's teaching and concludes with his own criticisms. Bahm's lack of sympathy, however, prevented him from seeing the relevance of Buddha's teaching to the problems confronting Western civilization. And in desiring too much to argue and to document, he (...)
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  38.  5
    Greek Buddha: Pyrrho’s Encounter with Early Buddhism in Central Asia.Stephen Batchelor - 2016 - Contemporary Buddhism 17 (1):195-215.
    In his book Greek Buddha: Pyrrho’s Encounter with Early Buddhism in Central Asia, Christopher Beckwith argues that not only was the Buddha a Scythian from Central Asia, but that the earliest reliable record of Buddhist teaching is to be found in a text attributed to Pyrrho, the Greek founder of philosophical scepticism, cited by the third-century Christian bishop Eusebius. This review considers these claims in the light of epigraphical, textual and archaeological evidence. It then offers an alternative account (...)
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  39.  14
    Reading the Buddha as a Philosopher.Douglass Smith & Justin Whitaker - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):515-538.
    Scholars debate whether the Buddha’s teachings preserved in the Pāli Canon can be considered philosophy, and whether the Buddha himself can be considered a philosopher. The existence of a philosophically tractable Buddhist soteriology is not in doubt; however, there is debate over the point at which this structure emerges in the tradition. In this essay we put forth several prominent objections to reading the Buddha as a philosopher, then offer responses to these objections based in part on (...)
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  40.  43
    Review of Peter Kelly, Buddha in a Bookshop. [REVIEW]Harry Oldmeadow - 2007 - Sophia 46 (3):315-316.
    Keywords Harold Stewart - Peter Kelly - Traditionalist circle in Melbourne PETER KELLY, Buddha in a Bookshop. North Fitzroy, Vic, Australia: Ulysses Press, 2007, 176t viii pp., ISBN: 9780646469775, pb.
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  41.  8
    Is “Buddha-Nature” Buddhist?Richard King - unknown
    Recent controversies in Japanese Buddhist scholarship have focused upon the Mah y na notion of a “Buddha nature” within all sentient beings and whether or not the concept is compatible with traditional Buddhist teachings such as an tman. This controversy is not only relevant to Far Eastern Buddhism, for which the notion of a Buddha-nature is a central doctrinal theme, but also for the roots of this tradition in those Indian Mah y na s tras which utilised the (...)
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  42.  20
    Buddha Dhamma: A Higher Affirmation.J. D. T. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (1):193-193.
    A self-admittedly unorthodox attempt to apply the teachings of Buddha to the problems of contemporary India. Unostentatious in design, it is a highly personal interpretation of Buddhist teaching by a sensitive Indian thinker.--J. D. T. Jr.
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  43.  19
    On the Buddha’s Cognition of Other Minds in the Bahirarthaparīkṣā of the Tattvasaṅgraha.Hiroko Matsuoka - 2014 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):297-307.
    This paper aims at examining the arguments between Śubhagupta (c.720–780) and Śāntarakṣita (c.725–788) over the Buddha’s cognition of other minds and shows how the question of the Buddha’s cognition of other mindsis incorporated into the proof of vijñaptimātratā or “consciousness-only” by Śāntarakṣita. According to Śāntarakṣita, Śubhagupta assumes that the Buddha’s cognition, which is characterized as “the cognition [of the Blessed One] which follows the path of cognition” (aupalambhikadarśana), grasps other minds when the Buddha’s cognition is similar (...)
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  44.  36
    From Buddha's Speech to Buddha's Essence: Philosophical Discussions of Buddha‐Vacana in India and China1.Eunsu Cho - 2004 - Asian Philosophy 14 (3):255 – 276.
    This is a comparative study of the discourses on the nature of sacred language found in Indian Abhidharma texts and those written by 7th century Chinese Buddhist scholars who, unlike the Indian Buddhists, questioned 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching'. This issue labeled fo-chiao t'i lun, the theory of 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching', was one of the topics on which Chinese Yogācāra scholars have shown a keen interest and served as the inspiration for extensive intellectual dialogues (...)
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  45.  8
    Open Hope as a Civic Virtue: Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha.Judith Andre - 2013 - Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different. But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for making any sense of hope.Buddhism would seem (...)
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  46.  29
    The Buddha and Wittgenstein: A Brief Philosophical Exegesis.A. D. P. Kalansuriya - 1993 - Asian Philosophy 3 (2):103 – 111.
    Abstract An attempt is made to analyse the key notions in the Buddha's Dhamma? ?truth?, ?knowledge?, ?emancipation??by way of the philosophical techniques of the later Wittgenstein. The analysis hence is both comparative and noncomparative. It is comparative because two thought processes from two different traditions are brought together. And it is noncomparative since it brings into focus a philosophical exegesis as against a comparative exposition. In the process not only are philosophical errors in comparative exposition made explicit in our (...)
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  47.  27
    The Whole Body, Not Heart, as 'Seat of Consciousness': The Buddha's View.Suwanda H. J. Sugunasiri - 1995 - Philosophy East and West 45 (3):409-430.
    The traditional view in Theravada Buddhism of the heart (hadaya) as the 'seat of consciousness' is explored. Evidence is sought in the Nikayas, the Abhidhamma and commentaries, Buddhaghosa's "Visuddhimagga" (5th century), and Kassapa's "Mohavicchedani" (12th century). Some possible sources of error are identified. The view is challenged on the basis of the early teachings of the Buddha and the alternative view, that it is the whole body that is the seat of consciousness, is reconstructed. Some possible future comparative research (...)
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  48.  19
    An Easier Way to Become a Buddha?Fuchuan Yao - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (2):121-132.
    Jay Garfield proposes a transpersonal way to ease the extreme difficulty to become a Buddha for those refugees who are agonized by the arduous pursuit. By ?transpersonal method?, Garfield means that we could accumulate others? karma to become a Buddha just as we do with others? knowledge. Garfield's proposal touches an essential question of Buddhism: how to become a Buddha or how to attain nirvana? Generally, most Buddhists think that nirvana should be done through the intrapersonal (or (...)
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  49.  23
    A Buddha and His Cousin.Richard Hayes - manuscript
    Like most religions, the Buddhist tradition is rich in stories that are designed to illustrate key principles and values. Stories of the Buddha himself offer a verbal portrait of an ideal human being that followers of the tradition can aspire to emulate; his story offers a picture of a person with a perfectly healthy mind. Stories of other people (and of gods, ghosts and ghouls) portray a wide range of beings from the nearly perfect to the dreadfully imperfect, all (...)
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  50.  8
    Does Even a Rat Have Buddha‐Nature? Analyzing Key‐Phrase Rhetoric for the Wu Gongan.Steven Heine - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (3-4):250-267.
    The Wu Gongan is primarily known for its minimalist expression based on Zhaozhou's “No” response to a monk's question of whether a dog has Buddha-nature. Crucial for the key-phrase method of meditation of Dahui Zonggao, the term Wu is not to be analyzed through logic or poetry. However, an overemphasis on the nondiscursive quality overlooks sophisticated rhetoric through metaphors used for the anxiety of doubt caused by Wu undermining conventional assumptions that is compared to a cornered rat; and the (...)
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