Results for 'Burr McCloskey'

483 found
Order:
  1.  3
    The Proper Study of Mankind. Stuart Chase.Burr McCloskey - 1951 - Philosophy of Science 18 (3):270-271.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  3
    Book Review:Philosophy of Peace John Somerville. [REVIEW]Burr McCloskey - 1952 - Philosophy of Science 19 (4):347-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  20
    Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey.H. J. Mccloskey - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in natural, human rights; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  25
    Kant's Kingdom of Ends: Mary A. McCloskey.Mary A. Mccloskey - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (198):391-399.
    There are many uses of the word ‘ought’, not all of which are moral uses. The following sentences contain ‘oughts’ which are not moral ‘oughts’. The peaches on the tree nearest the house ought to be ripe. The old car ought to go now it's had a re-bore. You ought to prune your Lorraine Lee roses in February. You ought to wash your hands before meals. You ought to take more exercise.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. Philosophy and Contemporary Issues Edited by John R. Burr and Milton Goldinger. --.John Roy Burr & Milton Goldinger - 1972 - Macmillan.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  37
    Minds.Mary A. Mccloskey - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):303-312.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scorned the bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s _The Bourgeois Virtues_, a magnum (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  8. The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scorned the bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s _The Bourgeois Virtues_, a magnum (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  9. Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Can't Explain the Modern World.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    The big economic story of our times is not the Great Recession. It is how China and India began to embrace neoliberal ideas of economics and attributed a sense of dignity and liberty to the bourgeoisie they had denied for so long. The result was an explosion in economic growth and proof that economic change depends less on foreign trade, investment, or material causes, and a whole lot more on ideas and what people believe. Or so says Deirdre N. (...) in _Bourgeois Dignity_, a fiercely contrarian history that wages a similar argument about economics in the West. Here she turns her attention to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe to reconsider the birth of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. According to McCloskey, our modern world was not the product of new markets and innovations, but rather the result of shifting opinions about them. During this time, talk of private property, commerce, and even the bourgeoisie itself radically altered, becoming far more approving and flying in the face of prejudices several millennia old. The wealth of nations, then, didn’t grow so dramatically because of economic factors: it grew because rhetoric about markets and free enterprise finally became enthusiastic and encouraging of their inherent dignity. An utterly fascinating sequel to her critically acclaimed book _The Bourgeois Virtues, Bourgeois Dignity_ is a feast of intellectual riches from one of our most spirited and ambitious historians—a work that will forever change our understanding of how the power of persuasion shapes our economic lives. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10. Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is economics a science? Deidre McCloskey says 'Yes, but'. Yes, economics measures and predicts, but - like other sciences - it uses literary methods too. Economists use stories as geologists do, and metaphors as physicists do. The result is that the sciences, economics among them, must be read as 'rhetoric', in the sense of writing with intent. McCloskey's books, The Rhetoric of Economics and If You're So Smart, have been widely discussed. In Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics he (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  11. Bourgeois Dignity: Why Economics Can't Explain the Modern World.Deirdre N. McCloskey - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    The big economic story of our times is not the Great Recession. It is how China and India began to embrace neoliberal ideas of economics and attributed a sense of dignity and liberty to the bourgeoisie they had denied for so long. The result was an explosion in economic growth and proof that economic change depends less on foreign trade, investment, or material causes, and a whole lot more on ideas and what people believe. Or so says Deirdre N. (...) in _Bourgeois Dignity_, a fiercely contrarian history that wages a similar argument about economics in the West. Here she turns her attention to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe to reconsider the birth of the industrial revolution and the rise of capitalism. According to McCloskey, our modern world was not the product of new markets and innovations, but rather the result of shifting opinions about them. During this time, talk of private property, commerce, and even the bourgeoisie itself radically altered, becoming far more approving and flying in the face of prejudices several millennia old. The wealth of nations, then, didn’t grow so dramatically because of economic factors: it grew because rhetoric about markets and free enterprise finally became enthusiastic and encouraging of their inherent dignity. An utterly fascinating sequel to her critically acclaimed book _The Bourgeois Virtues, Bourgeois Dignity_ is a feast of intellectual riches from one of our most spirited and ambitious historians—a work that will forever change our understanding of how the power of persuasion shapes our economic lives. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  10
    Functional Interpretation of Aczel's Constructive Set Theory.Wolfgang Burr - 2000 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 104 (1-3):31-73.
    In the present paper we give a functional interpretation of Aczel's constructive set theories CZF − and CZF in systems T ∈ and T ∈ + of constructive set functionals of finite types. This interpretation is obtained by a translation × , a refinement of the ∧ -translation introduced by Diller and Nahm 49–66) which again is an extension of Gödel's Dialectica translation. The interpretation theorem gives characterizations of the definable set functions of CZF − and CZF in terms of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  13.  32
    Concepts and Aims of Functional Interpretations: Towards a Functional Interpretation of Constructive Set Theory.Wolfgang Burr - 2002 - Synthese 133 (1-2):257 - 274.
    The aim of this article is to give an introduction to functional interpretations of set theory given by the authorin Burr (2000a). The first part starts with some general remarks on Gödel's functional interpretation with a focus on aspects related to problems that arise in the context of set theory. The second part gives an insight in the techniques needed to perform a functional interpretation of systems of set theory. However, the first part of this article is not intended (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. A Bibliography of Historical Economics to 1980.Donald N. McCloskey & Hersh Jr (eds.) - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historians and economists will find here what their fields have in common - the movement since the 1950s known variously as 'cliometrics', 'economic history', or 'historical economics'. A leading figure in the movement, Donald McCloskey, has compiled, with the help of George Hersh and a panel of distinguished advisors, a highly comprehensive bibliography of historical economics covering the period up until 1980. The book will be useful to all economic historians, as well as quantitative historians, applied economists, historical demographers, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Why Liberalism Works: How True Liberal Values Produce a Freer, More Equal, Prosperous World for All.Deirdre Nansen McCloskey - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    _An insightful and passionately written book explaining why a return to Enlightenment ideals is good for the world__ The greatest challenges facing humankind, according to Deirdre McCloskey, are poverty and tyranny, both of which hold people back. Arguing for a return to true liberal values, this engaging and accessible book develops, defends, and demonstrates how embracing the ideas first espoused by eighteenth-century philosophers like Locke, Smith, Voltaire, and Wollstonecraft is good for everyone. With her trademark wit and deep understanding, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Digital Psychiatry: Ethical Risks and Opportunities for Public Health and Well-Being.Christopher Burr, Jessica Morley, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - manuscript
    Common mental health disorders are rising globally, creating a strain on public healthcare systems. This has led to a renewed interest in the role that digital technologies may have for improving mental health outcomes. One result of this interest is the development and use of artificial intelligence for assessing, diagnosing, and treating mental health issues, which we refer to as ‘digital psychiatry’. This article focuses on the increasing use of digital psychiatry outside of clinical settings, in the following sectors: education, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Ethics of Digital Well-Being: A Thematic Review.Christopher Burr, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - manuscript
    This article presents the first thematic review of the literature on the ethical issues concerning digital well-being. The term ‘digital well-being’ is used to refer to the impact of digital technologies on what it means to live a life that is good for a human being, and review the existing literature on the ethics of digital well-being, with the goal of mapping the current debate and identifying open questions for future research. The review identifies key issues related to four key (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Empowerment or Engagement? Digital Health Technologies for Mental Healthcare.Christopher Burr & Jessica Morley - manuscript
    We argue that while digital health technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence, smartphones, and virtual reality) present significant opportunities for improving the delivery of healthcare, key concepts that are used to evaluate and understand their impact can obscure significant ethical issues related to patient engagement and experience. Specifically, we focus on the concept of empowerment and ask whether it is adequate for addressing some significant ethical concerns that relate to digital health technologies for mental healthcare. We frame these concerns using five key (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Can Machines Read Our Minds?Christopher Burr & Nello Cristianini - 2019 - Minds and Machines 29 (3):461-494.
    We explore the question of whether machines can infer information about our psychological traits or mental states by observing samples of our behaviour gathered from our online activities. Ongoing technical advances across a range of research communities indicate that machines are now able to access this information, but the extent to which this is possible and the consequent implications have not been well explored. We begin by highlighting the urgency of asking this question, and then explore its conceptual underpinnings, in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. When the World Becomes 'Too Real': A Bayesian Explanation of Autistic Perception.Elizabeth Pellicano & David Burr - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (10):504-510.
  21.  35
    The Debate on the Ethics of AI in Health Care: A Reconstruction and Critical Review.Jessica Morley, Caio C. V. Machado, Christopher Burr, Josh Cowls, Indra Joshi, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - manuscript
    Healthcare systems across the globe are struggling with increasing costs and worsening outcomes. This presents those responsible for overseeing healthcare with a challenge. Increasingly, policymakers, politicians, clinical entrepreneurs and computer and data scientists argue that a key part of the solution will be ‘Artificial Intelligence’ (AI) – particularly Machine Learning (ML). This argument stems not from the belief that all healthcare needs will soon be taken care of by “robot doctors.” Instead, it is an argument that rests on the classic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  29
    An Analysis of the Interaction Between Intelligent Software Agents and Human Users.Christopher Burr, Nello Cristianini & James Ladyman - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):735-774.
    Interactions between an intelligent software agent and a human user are ubiquitous in everyday situations such as access to information, entertainment, and purchases. In such interactions, the ISA mediates the user’s access to the content, or controls some other aspect of the user experience, and is not designed to be neutral about outcomes of user choices. Like human users, ISAs are driven by goals, make autonomous decisions, and can learn from experience. Using ideas from bounded rationality, we frame these interactions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  14
    Cognitive Mechanisms in Numerical Processing: Evidence From Acquired Dyscalculia.Michael McCloskey - 1992 - Cognition 44 (1-2):107-157.
  24.  22
    What Connectionist Models Learn: Learning and Representation in Connectionist Networks.Stephen José Hanson & David J. Burr - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):471-489.
  25.  7
    Cognitive Processes in Verbal-Number Production: Inferences From the Performance of Brain-Damaged Subjects.Michael McCloskey, Scott M. Sokol & Roberta A. Goodman - 1986 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 115 (4):307-330.
  26.  27
    The Body as Laboratory: Prediction-Error Minimization, Embodiment, and Representation.Christopher Burr & Max Jones - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):586-600.
    In his paper, Jakob Hohwy outlines a theory of the brain as an organ for prediction-error minimization, which he claims has the potential to profoundly alter our understanding of mind and cognition. One manner in which our understanding of the mind is altered, according to PEM, stems from the neurocentric conception of the mind that falls out of the framework, which portrays the mind as “inferentially-secluded” from its environment. This in turn leads Hohwy to reject certain theses of embodied cognition. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  27.  19
    The Poverty of Methodology.Alfonso Caramazza & Michael McCloskey - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):444-445.
  28.  27
    Linear Mapping of Numbers Onto Space Requires Attention.Giovanni Anobile, Guido Marco Cicchini & David C. Burr - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):454-459.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29.  35
    What Connectionist Models Learn.Susan Hanson & D. Burr - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
  30.  5
    In Defense of a Modular Architecture for the Number-Processing System: Reply to Campbell and Clark.Scott M. Sokol, Roberta Goodman-Schulman & Michael McCloskey - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (1):105-110.
  31.  63
    Saccades Compress Space, Time and Number.David C. Burr, John Ross, Paola Binda & M. Concetta Morrone - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (12):528-533.
  32.  96
    Sluicing and Logical Form.Sandra Chung, William A. Ladusaw & James McCloskey - 1995 - Natural Language Semantics 3 (3):239-282.
    This paper presents a novel analysis of Sluicing, an ellipsis construction first described by Ross (1969) and illustrated by the bracketed portion ofI want to do something, but I'm just not sure [what _]. Starting from the assumption that a sluice consists of a displaced Wh-constituent and an empty IP, we show how simple and general LF operations fill out the empty IP and thereby provide it with an interpretable Logical Form. The LF operations we appeal to rely on the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  33.  14
    Embodied Decisions and the Predictive Brain.Christopher Burr - 2017 - Philosophy and Predictive Processing.
    A cognitivist account of decision-making views choice behaviour as a serial process of deliberation and commitment, which is separate from perception and action. By contrast, recent work in embodied decision-making has argued that this account is incompatible with emerging neurophysiological data. We argue that this account has significant overlap with an embodied account of predictive processing, and that both can offer mutual development for the other. However, more importantly, by demonstrating this close connection we uncover an alternative perspective on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. A Non-Utilitarian Approach to Punishment.H. J. McCloskey - 1965 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 8 (1-4):249 – 263.
    Although the view that punishment is to be justified on utilitarian grounds has obvious appeal, an examination of utilitarianism reveals that, consistently and accurately interpreted, it dictates unjust punishments which are unacceptable to the common moral consciousness. In this rule?utilitarianism is no more satisfactory than is act?utilitarianism. Although the production of the greatest good, or the greatest happiness, of the greatest number is obviously a relevant consideration when determining which punishments may properly be inflicted, the question as to which punishment (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  35.  12
    Secondary Psychopathy, but Not Primary Psychopathy, is Associated with Risky Decision-Making in Noninstitutionalized Young Adults.Andy C. Dean, Lily L. Altstein, Mitchell E. Berman, Joseph I. Constans, Catherine A. Sugar & Michael S. McCloskey - 2013 - Personality and Individual Differences 54:272–277.
    Although risky decision-making has been posited to contribute to the maladaptive behavior of individuals with psychopathic tendencies, the performance of psychopathic groups on a common task of risky decision-making, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994), has been equivocal. Different aspects of psychopathy (personality traits, antisocial deviance) and/or moderating variables may help to explain these inconsistent findings. In a sample of college students (N = 129, age 18–27), we examined the relationship between primary and secondary psychopathic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36. An Examination of Restricted Utilitarianism.H. J. McCloskey - 1957 - Philosophical Review 66 (4):466-485.
  37. God and Evil.H. J. McCloskey - 1960 - Philosophical Quarterly 10 (39):97-114.
  38.  19
    Misleading Postevent Information and Memory for Events: Arguments and Evidence Against Memory Impairment Hypotheses.Michael McCloskey & Maria Zaragoza - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (1).
  39.  19
    Mirror-Image Confusions: Implications for Representation and Processing of Object Orientation.Emma Gregory & Michael McCloskey - 2010 - Cognition 116 (1):110-129.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Rights.H. J. McCloskey - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):115-127.
  41. The Patient Self-Determination Act.Elizabeth Leibold McCloskey - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (2):163-169.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics.George F. DeMartino & Deirdre N. McCloskey (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  33
    The Unreasonable Ineffectiveness of Fisherian “Tests” in Biology, and Especially in Medicine.Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (1):44-53.
    Biometrics has done damage with levels of R or p or Student’s t. The damage widened with Ronald A. Fisher’s victory in the 1920s and 1930s in devising mechanical methods of “testing,” against methods of common sense and scientific impact, “oomph.” The scale along which one would measure oomph is particularly clear in biomedical sciences: life or death. Cardiovascular epidemiology, to take one example, combines with gusto the “fallacy of the transposed conditional” and what we call the “sizeless stare” of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  12
    Misleading Postevent Information and Memory for Events: Arguments and Evidence Against Memory Impairment Hypotheses.Michael McCloskey & Maria Zaragoza - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (1):1-16.
  45.  52
    Thinking Ethically About Genetic Inheritance: Liberal Rights, Communitarianism and the Right to Privacy for Parents of Donor Insemination Children.J. Burr & P. Reynolds - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):281-284.
    The issue of genetic inheritance, and particularly the contradictory rights of donors, recipients and donor offspring as to the disclosure of donor identities, is ethically complicated. Donors, donor offspring and parents of donor offspring may appeal to individual rights for confidentiality or disclosure within legal systems based on liberal rights discourse. This paper explores the ethical issues of non-disclosure of genetic inheritance by contrasting two principle models used to articulate the problem—liberal and communitarian ethical models. It argues that whilst the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46.  8
    Measured, Unmeasured, Mismeasured, and Unjustified Pessimism: A Review Essay of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century.Deirdre Nansen McCloskey - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (2):73.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. The Concept of Consciousness.Alexander Hartley Burr - 1904 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (5):118-124.
  48.  19
    Fragments of Heyting Arithmetic.Wolfgang Burr - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (3):1223-1240.
    We define classes $\Phi_n$ of formulae of first-order arithmetic with the following properties: Every $\varphi \in \Phi_n$ is classically equivalent to a $\Pi_n$-formula $. $\bigcup_{n\in \omega} \Phi_n = \mathscr L_A$. $I\Pi_n$ and $i\Phi_n$ prove the same $\Pi_2$-formulae. We further generalize a result by Visser and Wehmeier, namely that prenex induction within intuitionistic arithmetic is rather weak: After closing $\Phi_n$ both under existential and universal quantification the corresponding theories i$\Theta_n$ still prove the same $\Pi_2$-formulae. In a second part we consider i$\Delta_0$ (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49. Moral Rights and Animals.H. J. McCloskey - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):23 – 54.
    In Section I, the purely conceptual issue as to whether animals other than human beings, all or some, may possess rights is examined. This is approached via a consideration of the concept of a moral right, and by way of examining the claims of sentience, consciousness, capacities for pleasure and pain, having desires, possessing interests, self-consciousness, rationality in various senses. It is argued that only beings possessed actually or potentially of the capacity to be morally self-determining can be possessors of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50.  9
    Profound Loss of General Knowledge in Retrograde Amnesia: Evidence From an Amnesic Artist.Emma Gregory, Michael McCloskey & Barbara Landau - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
1 — 50 / 483