Search results for 'Business Judaism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  80
    Elliot N. Dorff (1997). Judaism, Business and Privacy. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):31-44.
    This article first describes some of the chief contrasts between Judaism and American secularism in their underlying convictions about the business environment and the expectations which all involved in business can have of each other—namely, duties vs. rights,communitarianism vs. individualism, and ties to God and to the environment based on our inherent status as God’s creatures rather than on our pragmatic choice. Conservative Judaism’s methodology for plumbing the Jewish tradition for guidance is described and contrasted to (...)
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  2.  32
    Abbas J. Ali, Robert C. Camp & Manton Gibbs (2005). The Concept of “Free Agency” in Monotheistic Religions: Implications for Global Business. Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):103-112.
    The current debate on “free agency” seems to highlight the romantic aspects of free agent and considers it a genuine response to changing economic conditions (e.g., high-unemployment rate, importance of knowledge in the labor market, the eclipse of organizational loyalty, and self pride). Little attention, if any, has been given to the religious root of the free agency concept and its persistent existence across history. In this paper, the current discourse on free agency and the conditions that have led to (...)
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  3.  20
    Moses L. Pava (1998). The Substance of Jewish Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):149-163.
    Philosophers generally agree that meaningful ethical statements are universal in scope. If so, what sense is there to speak about a business ethics particular to Judaism? Just as a Jewish algebra and a Jewish physics are contradictions in terms, so too, is the notion of a particularly Jewish business ethics. The goal of this paper is to deny the above assertion and to explore the potentially unique characteristic of a Jewish business ethics. Ethics, in the final (...)
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  4.  11
    Moses L. Pava (1998). Developing a Religiously Grounded Business Ethics: A Jewish Perspective. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):65-83.
    The specific purpose of this introductory paper is to explicitly introduce readers to some of the important Biblical, Talmudic, andpost-Talmudic texts which deal with business ethics. As the discussion will show, Judaism’s traditional texts treat an amazing variety of issues emphasizing responsibilities in the business context. These texts are both legalistic and aspirational in character. The theme of this study is that an authentic Jewish business ethics needs to grow out of an understanding of the needs (...)
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  5.  21
    Moses L. Pava (1998). Developing a Religiously Grounded Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):65-83.
    The specific purpose of this introductory paper is to explicitly introduce readers to some of the important Biblical, Talmudic, andpost-Talmudic texts which deal with business ethics. As the discussion will show, Judaism’s traditional texts treat an amazing variety of issues emphasizing responsibilities in the business context. These texts are both legalistic and aspirational in character. The theme of this study is that an authentic Jewish business ethics needs to grow out of an understanding of the needs (...)
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  6.  4
    Jacques Cory (2005). Activist Business Ethics. Springer.
    This book asks the question, how could we convince or compel modern business to apply ethical standards and is it essential to the success of economy? In order to answer the question, this book examines the evolution of the activist business ethics in business, in democracies, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, in philosophy, psychology and psychoanalysis. The book examines international aspects, the personification of stakeholders, the predominance of values and ethics for CEOs and the inefficient safeguards of (...)
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  7.  9
    Mitchell Langbert & Donald Grunewald (2004). The Real Estate Investor. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (1):91-99.
    This case study chronicles the entrepreneurial and real estate investment activities of a recent Ph.D. graduate in business administration. The protagonist learns that clear focus is necessary for entrepreneurial success and that trust does not mix with entrepreneurship and negotiation. Ethics are sometimes problematic for entrepreneurs.
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  8. Shalom Arush (2007). Sefer Be-Gan Ha-Osher: Madrikh Maʻaśi la-ʻashir Ha-Amiti. Mosdot "Ḥuṭ Shel Ḥesed".
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  9. Shalom Arush (2010). The Garden of Riches: A Practical Guide to Financial Success. Chut Shel Chessed.
     
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  10. Pinḥas Shalom ben Shelomoh Fridman (2004). Sefer Mekhalkel Ḥayim: ʻoseḳ Be-ʻinyene Hishtadlut Ha-Parnasah Ṿe-Khol Ha-Sovev .. Pinḥas Shalom Ben Shelomoh Fridman.
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  11. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov ben Mikhaʼ Lipsḳi & el (2009). Bi-Shevil She-Titʻasher: Hanhagot, Beʼurim, ʻiyunim U-Tefilot le-Farnasah Ṭovah. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov Lipsḳi.
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  12. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov ben Mikhaʼel Lipsḳi (2009). Bi-Shevil She-Titʻasher: Hanhagot, Beʼurim, ʻiyunim U-Tefilot le-Farnasah Ṭovah. Efrayim Yaʻaḳov Lipsḳi.
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  13.  35
    David Vogel (2001). How Green is Judaism? Exploring Jewish Environmental Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):349-363.
    This article draws on ancient and medieval Jewish texts to explore the role of the physical environment in Jewish thought. Itsituates Jewish teachings in the context of the debate between anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, discusses the Jewish view ofnature, and reviews various interpretations of an important Biblical precept of environmental ethics. It argues that while Jewish thoughtcontains many "green" elements, it also contains a number of beliefs that challenge some contemporary environmental values.
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  14.  8
    Nicholas Capaldi (ed.) (2005). Business and Religion: A Clash of Civilizations? M & M Scrivener Press.
    The purpose of this volume is to inaugurate a dialogue on the common elements of all three Abrahamic traditions - Christianity, Islam, and Judaism - that touch ...
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  15. Moses L. Pava (2011). Jewish Ethics in a Post-Madoff World: A Case for Optimism. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- PART 1: Overview * Jewish Ethics in a New Key * Temptations of Tradition * Sacred Compromise * Renewing Jewish Ethics * PART II: On the Ground * Learning to Speak about the Elephant in the Room * The Art of Moral Criticism * Deal Breaker and the Money Laundering Rabbis * Loving the Stranger and the Fall of the Agriprocessors * The Problem with Income and Wealth Inequalities * PART III: Frontiers * "The Exaltation (...)
     
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  16. Mosheh Rozen (ed.) (2008). Mafteaḥ Ha-Parnasah: Divre Hagut, Maḥshavah U-Musar ʻal Ha-Parnasah le-or Divre Ḥazal .. Feldhaim.
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  17. Menachem Mendel Schneerson (2009). Heṿeh Gevir: Ha-Derekh le-Ḥayim Shel ʻashirut. Mekhon Otsrot Menaḥem.
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  18.  38
    Abbas J. Ali, Robert C. Camp & Manton Gibbs (2000). The ten Commandments Perspective on Power and Authority in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):351 - 361.
    Power and authority in terms of the Ten Commandments (TCs) are discussed. The paper reviews the TCs in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The treatment and basis for power and authority in each religion are clarified. Implications of power and authority using the perspective of the TCs are provided. The paper suggests that in today's business environment people tend to be selective in identifying only with certain elements of the TCs that fit their interest and that the TCs should (...)
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  19.  31
    Joshua Fogel & Hershey H. Friedman (2008). Conflict of Interest and the Talmud. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):237-246.
    A core value of Judaism is leading an ethical life. The Talmud, an authoritative source on Jewish law and tradition, has a number of discussions that deal with honesty in business and decision-making. One motive that can cause individuals to be unscrupulous is the presence of a conflict of interest. This paper will define, discuss, and review five Talmudic concepts relevant to conflict of interest. They are (1) Nogea B’Davar (being an interested party), (2) V’hiyitem N’keyim (behaving to (...)
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  20.  42
    J. Van Buren Harry (1999). Acting More Generously Than the Law Requires: The Issue of Employee Layoffs in Halakhah. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):335-343.
    In this paper, the issue of plant closings is analyzed from the perspective of halakhah (the Written Law of Judaism). Two levels of analysis in halakhah must be differentiated: the legal (enforced by courts) and the moral (not enforced by law, but rather framed in terms of duty to God). There is no legal mandate to keep an unprofitable plant open, but there are a number of moral imprecations (particularly "acting more generously than the law requires") that might influence (...)
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  21.  3
    J. van Buren Iii Harry (1999). Acting More Generously Than the Law Requires: The Issue of Employee Layoffs in Halakhah. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):335-343.
    In this paper, the issue of plant closings is analyzed from the perspective of halakhah (the Written Law of Judaism). Two levels of analysis in halakhah must be differentiated: the legal (enforced by courts) and the moral (not enforced by law, but rather framed in terms of duty to God). There is no legal mandate to keep an unprofitable plant open, but there are a number of moral imprecations (particularly "acting more generously than the law requires") that might influence (...)
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  22. Nilton Bonder (1996). The Kabbalah of Money: Insights on Livelihood, Business, and All Forms of Economic Behavior. Distributed in the United States by Random House.
    _____This book challenges us to take a broad and ethical view of economic behavior, which includes all forms of exchange and human interaction, from how we spend our money to how we fulfill our role as responsible human beings in a global ecological framework. Drawing on Jewish ethical teachings, mystical lore, and tales of the Hasidic masters, the author examines a wide range of subjects, including competition, partnerships, and contracts, loans and interest, the laws of fair exchange, and tips and (...)
     
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  23.  61
    John Raymond Boatright (2009). Ethics and the Conduct of Business. Pearson Prentice Hall.
    Ethics in the world of business -- Welfare, rights, and justice -- Equality, liberty, and virtue -- Whistle-blowing -- Trade secrets and conflict of interest -- Privacy -- Discrimination and affirmative action -- Employment rights -- Occupational health and safety -- Marketing, advertising, and product safety -- Ethics in finance -- Corporate social responsibility -- Corporate governance and accountability -- International business ethics.
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  24.  40
    Linda Klebe Treviño (2010). Managing Business Ethics: Straight Talk About How to Do It Right. Wiley.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I: Introduction to Business Ethics. -- Chapter 1: Overview of Business Ethics and This Book. -- Part II: Business Ethics and the Individual. -- Chapter 2: Deciding What's Right - A Prescriptive Approach. -- Chapter 3: Common Ethical Problems. -- Chapter 4: Deciding What's Right - A Psychological Approach. -- Chapter 5: Finding Your Moral Voice. -- Part III: Business Ethics and the Organization. -- Chapter 6: Ethics as Organizational Culture. -- (...)
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  25.  75
    Terry W. Loe, Linda Ferrell & Phylis Mansfield (2000). A Review of Empirical Studies Assessing Ethical Decision Making in Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (3):185 - 204.
    This article summarizes the multitude of empirical studies that test ethical decision making in business and suggests additional research necessary to further theory in this area. The studies are categorized and related to current theoretical ethical decision making models. The studies are related to awareness, individual and organizational factors, intent, and the role of moral intensity in ethical decision making. Summary tables provide a quick reference for the sample, findings, and publication outlet. This review provides insights for understanding organizational (...)
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  26. Robert C. Solomon (1992). Ethics and Excellence: Cooperation and Integrity in Business. Oxford University Press.
    The Greek philosopher Aristotle, writing over two thousand years before Wall Street, called people who engaged in activities which did not contribute to society "parasites." In his latest work, renowned scholar Robert C. Solomon asserts that though capitalism may require capital, but it does not require, much less should it be defined by the parasites it inevitably attracts. Capitalism has succeeded not with brute strength or because it has made people rich, but because it has produced responsible citizens and--however unevenly--prosperous (...)
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  27. Christopher Cosans (2009). Does Milton Friedman Support a Vigorous Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):391-399.
    This paper explores the level of obligation called for by Milton Friedman’s classic essay “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits.” Several scholars have argued that Friedman asserts that businesses have no or minimal social duties beyond compliance with the law. This paper argues that this reading of Friedman does not give adequate weight to some claims that he makes and to their logical extensions. Throughout his article, Friedman emphasizes the values of freedom, respect for law, and (...)
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  28. Brenda E. Joyner & Dinah Payne (2002). Evolution and Implementation: A Study of Values, Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (4):297 - 311.
    There is growing recognition that good ethics can have a positive economic impact on the performance of firms. Many statistics support the premise that ethics, values, integrity and responsibility are required in the modern workplace. For consumer groups and society at large, research has shown that good ethics is good business. This study defines and traces the emergence and evolution within the business literature of the concepts of values, business ethics and corporate social responsibility to illustrate the (...)
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  29.  27
    Susan C. Borkowski & Yusuf J. Ugras (1998). Business Students and Ethics: A Meta-Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1117-1127.
    Given the proliferation of research regarding the ethical development of students in general, and business students in particular, it is difficult to draw conclusions from the contradictory results of many studies. In this meta-analysis of empirical studies from 1985 through 1994, the relationships of gender, age and undergraduate major to the ethical attitudes and behavior of business students are analyzed. The results indicate that female students exhibit stronger ethical attitudes than males. The same is also true for older (...)
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  30. Kenneth E. Goodpaster (1991). Business Ethics and Stakeholder Analysis. Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):53-73.
    Much has been written about stakeholder analysis as a process by which to introduce ethical values into management decision-making. This paper takes a critical look at the assumptions behind this idea, in an effort to understand better the meaning of ethical management decisions.A distinction is made between stakeholder analysis and stakeholder synthesis. The two most natural kinds of stakeholder synthesis are then defined and discussed: strategic and multi-fiduciary. Paradoxically, the former appears to yield business without ethics and the latter (...)
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  31.  83
    Jeremy Moon, Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2005). Can Corporations Be Citizens? Corporate Citizenship as a Metaphor for Business Participation in Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):429-453.
    This paper investigates whether, in theoretical terms, corporations can be citizens. The argument is based on the observation that thedebate on “corporate citizenship” (CC) has only paid limited attention to the actual notion of citizenship. Where it has been discussed, authors have either largely left the concept of CC unquestioned, or applied rather unidimensional and decontextualized notions of citizenship to the corporate sphere. The paper opens with a critical discussion of a major contribution to the CC literature, the work of (...)
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  32.  48
    P. Waples Ethan, L. Antes Alison, T. Murphy Stephen, Connelly Shane & D. Mumford Michael (2009). A Meta-Analytic Investigation of Business Ethics Instruction. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):133 - 151.
    The education of students and professionals in business ethics is an increasingly important goal on the agenda of business schools and corporations. The present study provides a meta-analysis of 25 previously conducted business ethics instructional programs. The role of criteria, study design, participant characteristics, quality of instruction, instructional content, instructional program characteristics, and characteristics of instructional methods as moderators of the effectiveness of business ethics instruction were examined. Overall, results indicate that business ethics instructional programs (...)
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  33.  12
    Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dirk Matten (2009). The Changing Role of Business in Global Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):327-347.
    This article assesses some of the implications of globalization for the scholarly debate on business ethics, CSR and related concepts. The argument is based, among other things, on the declining capacity of nation state institutions to regulate socially desirable corporate behavior as well as the growing corporate exposure to heterogeneous social, cultural and political values in societies globally. It is argued that these changes are shifting the corporate role towards a sphere of societal governance hitherto dominated by traditional political (...)
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  34.  54
    Robert C. Solomon (2003). Victims of Circumstances? A Defense of Virtue Ethics in Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):43-62.
    Should the responsibilities of business managers be understood independently of the social circumstances and “market forces”that surround them, or (in accord with empiricism and the social sciences) are agents and their choices shaped by their circumstances,free only insofar as they act in accordance with antecedently established dispositions, their “character”? Virtue ethics, of which I consider myself a proponent, shares with empiricism this emphasis on character as well as an affinity with the social sciences. But recent criticisms of both empiricist (...)
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  35.  84
    Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper (...)
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  36.  62
    Gary Kok Yew chan (2008). The Relevance and Value of Confucianism in Contemporary Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):347 - 360.
    This article examines the relevance and value of Confucian Ethics to contemporary Business Ethics by comparing their respective perspectives and approaches towards business activities within the modern capitalist framework, the principle of reciprocity and the concept of human virtues. Confucian Ethics provides interesting parallels with contemporary Western-oriented Business Ethics. At the same, it diverges from contemporary Business Ethics in some significant ways. Upon an examination of philosophical texts as well as empirical studies, it is argued that (...)
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  37.  47
    Geoff Moore (2002). On the Implications of the Practice –Institution Distinction: Macintyre and the Application of Modern Virtue Ethics to Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):19-32.
    Abstract: After exploring MacIntyre’s (1985) practice—institution distinction, the article demonstrates its applicability to business-as-practice and to corporations as institutions. It then considers the implications of MacIntyre’s schema to ethical schizophrenia, to the claim that the market is a source of the virtues and to the opposite claim that capitalism corrodes character. A fully worked out modern virtue ethics, based on MacIntyre’s work, is then established and the claim is made and substantiated that such an understanding of MacIntrye’s work revitalises (...)
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  38.  32
    Raef A. Lawson (2004). Is Classroom Cheating Related to Business Students' Propensity to Cheat in the "Real World"? Journal of Business Ethics 49 (2):189-199.
    Previous studies have reportedstudents' widely held belief that they are moreethical than businessmen. On the other hand,widespread cheating among college students hasbeen reported. This paper examines thisinconsistency between the beliefs of collegestudent regarding the need for ethical behaviorin a business setting and their actions in anacademic setting.The results of this study indicate that whilestudents are generally upset with cheating intheir class, a large proportion of themnonetheless engage in such behavior. It wasfurther found that students have a goodunderstanding of what (...)
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  39.  45
    A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on (2006). The Business of Ethics and Gender. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101 - 116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624–635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the (...)
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  40. Richard T. De George (2010). Business Ethics. Prentice-Hall.
     
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  41. Joseph Heath (2006). Business Ethics Without Stakeholders. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):533-558.
    One of the most influential ideas in the field of business ethics has been the suggestion that ethical conduct in a business context should be analyzed in terms of a set of fiduciary obligations toward various “stakeholder” groups. Moral problems, according to this view, involve reconciling such obligations in cases where stakeholder groups have conflicting interests. The question posed in this paper is whether the stakeholder paradigm represents the most fruitful way of articulating the moral problems that arise (...)
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  42.  50
    Scott John Vitell, Jatinder J. Singh & Joseph G. P. Paolillo (2007). Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: The Roles of Money, Religiosity and Attitude Toward Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):369 - 379.
    This article presents the results of a study that investigated the roles that one’s money ethic, religiosity and attitude toward business play in determining consumer attitudes/beliefs in various situations regarding questionable consumer practices. Two dimensions of religiosity – intrinsic and extrinsic religiousness – were studied. A global scale of money ethic was examined, as was a global measure of attitude toward business. Results indicate that both types of religiosity as well as one’s money ethic and attitude toward (...) were significant determinants of at least some types of consumer ethical beliefs. (shrink)
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  43.  54
    M. Cecilia Arruda (1997). Business Ethics in Latin America. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (14):1597-1603.
    Business ethics is a relatively new topic of academic discussion in Latin America. Corruption and impunity came to be serious moral diseases in the region, probably as a result of a long period of dictatorship in most countries. Low ethical standards in the politics have had deep impact on individuals, organizations and economic systems. Excessive consumption, materialism and selfishness, in contrast with real poverty, have been responsible for a sloppiness in attitudes and principles in many Latin American countries. Even (...)
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  44.  54
    Dinah Payne, Cecily Raiborn & Jorn Askvik (1997). A Global Code of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (16):1727-1735.
    The international economy is changing at a rapid rate. The alteration and reduction of both geographical and political borders, coupled with the growing interdependence of socially, politically, economically, and legally diverse countries, have caused multinational corporate entities to revise various policies. These revisions include revisions in marketing strategies, strategic alliances, product and service strategies and, perhaps most importantly as it affects all strategies, a MNC's approach to ethical systems. The truly global company must come to grips with the legal and (...)
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  45.  23
    Bernhard F. Frey (2000). The Impact of Moral Intensity on Decision Making in a Business Context. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (3):181 - 195.
    The present paper reports the results of a vignette- and questionnaire-based research project investigating the influence of Moral Intensity (MI) on decision making in a New Zealand business context. The use of a relatively sensitive research design yielded results showing that – in contrast to previous research – objective manipulations, as well as subjective perceptions, of three of the six MI components were of particular importance in accounting for a comparatively large proportion of the variation in four outcome variables. (...)
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  46.  25
    Thomas L. Carson (2003). Self-Interest and Business Ethics: Some Lessons of the Recent Corporate Scandals. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):389 - 394.
    The recent accounting scandals at Enron, WorldCom, and other corporations have helped to fuel a massive loss of confidence in the integrity of American business and have contributed to a very sharp decline in the U.S. stock market. Inasmuch as these events have brought ethical questions about business to the forefront in the media and public consciousness as never before, they are of signal importance for the field of business ethics. I offer some observations and conjectures about (...)
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  47.  41
    Robert Audi (2012). Virtue Ethics as a Resource in Business. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):273-291.
    This paper provides an account of virtues as praiseworthy traits of character with a far-reaching capacity to influence conduct. Virtues supply their possessors both with good reasons that indicate, for diverse contexts, what sort of thing be done and with motivation to them. This motivational power of virtue is crucial for the question of what kind of person, or businessperson, one wants to be. The paper shows how the contrast between virtue ethics and rule ethics is often drawn too sharply (...)
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  48.  79
    Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2003). Right From Wrong: The Influence of Spirituality on Perceptions of Unethical Business Activities. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):85 - 97.
    A network sample of 162 employees from across the U.S. was studied to assess the relationship between individual spirituality and perceptions of unethical business activities. Analyses indicate that degree of individual spirituality influences whether an individual perceives a questionable business practice as ethical or unethical. Ramifications of these findings regarding the role of spirituality in enhancing workplace ethicality, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.
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  49.  27
    M. Lynnette Smyth & James R. Davis (2004). Perceptions of Dishonesty Among Two-Year College Students: Academic Versus Business Situations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (1):63-73.
    This study statistically analyzes two-year college students' attitudes toward cheating via a survey containing academic and business situations that the students evaluated on a seven point scale from unethical to ethical. When both the general questions concerning attitudes about cheating and the opinions on the ethical statements are considered, the business students were generally more unethical in their behavior and attitudes than non-business majors. These results indicate a need for more ethical exposure in business courses to (...)
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  50.  37
    Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton (1998). Religiousness and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):163-175.
    There is strong theoretical support for a relationship between various characteristics of religiousness and attitudes towards business ethics. This paper examines three frequently- studied dimensions of religiousness (fundamentalism, conservatism, and intrinsic religiousness) and their ability to predict students' willingness to behave unethically. Because prior research indicated a possible relationship between the religious affiliation of an institution and its members' ethical orientation, we studied students at universities with three different types of religious affiliation: evangelical, Catholic, and none.Results of the study (...)
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