Results for 'By Michael S. Brady'

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  1.  51
    Valuing, desiring and normative priority.By Michael S. Brady - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):231–242.
    Judgement internalism claims that our evaluative judgements will motivate us to act appropriately, at least in so far as we are rational. I examine how this claim should be understood, with particular focus on whether valuing enjoys a kind of 'normative priority' over desiring. I consider and reject views according to which valuing something provides one with a reason to be moved; this claim of normative priority and the readings of internalism it suggests are too strong. I also reject an (...)
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  2. Painfulness, Desire, and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):239-250.
    The traditional desire view of painfulness maintains that pain sensations are painful because the subject desires that they not be occurring. A significant criticism of this view is that it apparently succumbs to a version of the Euthyphro Dilemma: the desire view, it is argued, is committed to an implausible answer to the question of why pain sensations are painful. In this paper, I explain and defend a new desire view, and one which can avoid the Euthyphro Dilemma. This new (...)
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  3. Virtue, emotion and attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  4.  71
    Feeling Bad and Seeing Bad.Michael S. Brady - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (3):403-416.
    The emotions of guilt, shame, disappointment and grief, and the bodily states of pain and suffering, have something in common, at least phenomenologically: they are all unpleasant, they feel bad. But how might we explain what it is for some state to feel bad or unpleasant? What, in other words, is the nature of negative affect? In this paper I want to consider the prospects for evaluativist theories, which seek to explain unpleasantness by appeal to negative evaluations or appraisals. In (...)
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  5.  41
    Virtue, emotion and attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):115-131.
    The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions inform us about the sensible world. An important development of this position, prominent in recent work by Peter Goldie amongst others, concerns the essential role that virtuous habits of attention play in enabling us to gain perceptual and evaluative knowledge. I think that (...)
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  6. Moral and Epistemic Virtues.Michael S. Brady & Duncan Pritchard - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):1-11.
    This volume brings together papers by some of the leading figures working on virtue-theoretic accounts in both ethics and epistemology. A collection of cutting edge articles by leading figures in the field of virtue theory including Guy Axtell, Julia Driver, Antony Duff and Miranda Fricker. The first book to combine papers on both virtue ethics and virtue epistemology. Deals with key topics in recent epistemological and ethical debate.
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  7. Against Agent-Based Virtue Ethics.Michael S. Brady - 2004 - Philosophical Papers 33 (1):1-10.
    Abstract Agent-based virtue ethics is a unitary normative theory according to which the moral status of actions is entirely dependent upon the moral status of an agent's motives and character traits. One of the problems any such approach faces is to capture the common-sense distinction between an agent's doing the right thing, and her doing it for the right (or wrong) reason. In this paper I argue that agent-based virtue ethics ultimately fails to capture this kind of fine-grained distinction, and (...)
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  8.  34
    Group Emotion and Group Understanding.Michael S. Brady - 2016 - In Michael Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.), The Epistemic Life of Groups: Essays in the Epistemology of Collectives. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter focuses on the positive epistemic value that individual and group emotion can have. It explains how group emotion can help to bring about the highest epistemic good, namely group understanding. It is argues that this group good would be difficult to achieve, in very many cases, in the absence of group emotion. Even if group emotion sometimes—indeed often—leads us astray, we would be worse off, from the standpoint of achieving the highest epistemic good, without it. The chapter illustrates (...)
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  9.  33
    The Ethics of Care and Empathy, by Michael Slote.The Impossibility of Perfection: Aristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics, by Michael Slote.Michael S. Brady - 2015 - Mind 124 (495):980-988.
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  10.  26
    Learning from Adversity: Suffering and Wisdom.Michael S. Brady - 2019 - In Laura Candiotto (ed.), The Value of Emotions for Knowledge. Springer Verlag. pp. 197-214.
    It is commonplace, in philosophy and in everyday life, to think that suffering, understood as a kind of negative affective experience, is bad. Nevertheless, the case can be made that suffering, in certain instances and circumstances, has considerable value. Indeed, it seems plausible that we would be considerably worse off if we didn’t experience things like pain and remorse, hunger and shame. Those who are insensitive to pain don’t live very long, after all. And those who are incapable of feeling (...)
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  11.  6
    Virtue, emotion, and attention.Michael S. Brady - 2010 - In Heather Battaly (ed.), Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 115–131.
    This chapter contains sections titled: 1 2 3 4 Acknowledgments References.
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  12. Philosophy of Suffering: Metaphysics, Value, and Normativity.Michael S. Brady, David Bain & Jennifer Corns (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    A collection, edited by David Bain, Michael Brady, and Jennifer Corns, originating in our Value of Suffering Project. Table of Contents: Michael Wheeler - ‘How should affective phenomena be studied?’; Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni – ‘Pleasures, unpleasures, and emotions’; Hilla Jacobson – ‘The attitudinal representational theory of painfulness fleshed out’; Tim Schroeder – ‘What we represent when we represent the badness of getting hurt’; Hagit Benbaji – ‘A defence of the inner view of pain’; Olivier Massin (...)
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  13.  16
    Ethical Sentimentalism: New Perspectives, edited by Remy Debes and Karsten R. Stueber.Michael S. Brady - 2020 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 17 (4):461-463.
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  14.  23
    Suffering and punishment.Michael S. Brady - 2020 - In Amalia Amaya & Maksymilian Del Mar (eds.), Virtue, Emotion and Imagination in Law and Legal Reasoning. Chicago: Hart Publishing. pp. 139-156.
    This paper offers a defence of the Communicative Theory of Punishment against recent criticisms due to Matt Matravers. According to the Communicative Theory, the intentional imposition of suffering by the judiciary is justified because it is intrinsic to the condemnation and censure that an offender deserves as a result of wrongdoing. Matravers raises a number of worries about this idea – grounded in his thought that suffering isn’t necessary for censure, and as a consequence sometimes the imposition of suffering can (...)
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  15.  54
    Reasons and rational motivational access.Michael S. Brady - 1998 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):99–114.
    Practical Internalism holds that an agent's reasons for acting are entirely determined by his rational desires. This account is thought to be preferable to externalism, on the grounds that internalism alone can guarantee that agents have ‘rational motivational access’ (RMA) to their reasons. Rachel Cohon has recently argued that (i) internalism fails to ensure this, and (ii) an externalist account, akin to relativism, can guarantee RMA. I suggest that both of these claims are mistaken. I argue that relativism is best (...)
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  16.  12
    Moral and Epistemic Virtues.Duncan Pritchard Michael S. Brady - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):1-11.
  17. Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience.Michael Brady - 2013 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Michael S. Brady offers a new account of the role of emotions in our lives. He argues that emotional experiences do not give us information in the same way that perceptual experiences do. Instead, they serve our epistemic needs by capturing our attention and facilitating a reappraisal of the evaluative information that emotions themselves provide.
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  18.  36
    The development of Russell's structural postulates.Michael P. Bradie - 1977 - Philosophy of Science 44 (3):441-463.
    From 1914 on Russell's epistemology was dominated by the attempt to show how we come by our knowledge of the external world. As he gradually became aware of the inadequacies of the "pure empiricist" approach, Russell realized that his program was viable only insofar as certain postulates of inference were allowed. In this paper I trace the development of the structural postulates from Analysis of Matter to Human Knowledge. The basic continuity of Russell's thought is established. Certain confusions implicit in (...)
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  19.  81
    Ontic realism and scientific explanation.Michael Bradie - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):321.
    Wesley Salmon defends an ontic realism that distinguishes explanatory from descriptive knowledge. Explanatory knowledge makes appeals to (unobservable) theoretical acausal mechanisms. Salmon presents an argument designed both to legitimize attributing truth values to theoretical claims and to justify treating theoretical claims as descriptions. The argument succeeds but only at the price of calling the distinction between explanation and description into question. Even if Salmon's attempts to distinguish causal mechanisms from other mechanisms are successful, the assumed centrality of the appeal to (...)
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  20. The irrationality of recalcitrant emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  21. Emotions, Perceptions, and Reasons.Michael S. Brady - 2011 - In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
  22. Recalcitrant Emotions and Visual Illusions.Michael S. Brady - 2007 - American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):273 - 284.
  23.  31
    The role of emotion in intellectual virtue.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - In Heather Battaly (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Virtue Epistemology. pp. 47-58.
    Emotions are important for virtue, both moral and intellectual. This chapter aims to explain the significance of emotion for intellectual virtue along two dimensions. The first claim is that epistemic emotions can motivate intellectual inquiry, and thereby constitute ways of 'being for' intellectual goods. As a result, such emotions can constitute the motivational components of intellectual virtue. The second claim is that other emotions, rather than motivating intellectual inquiry and questioning, instead play a vital role in the regulation and control (...)
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  24. Value and Fitting Emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2008 - Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (4):465-475.
  25. Appropriate Attitudes and the Value Problem.Michael S. Brady - 2006 - American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):91 - 99.
  26.  37
    Why Suffering Is Essential to Wisdom.Michael S. Brady - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (3):467-469.
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  27.  93
    Skepticism, normativity, and practical identity.Michael S. Brady - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):403-412.
  28.  35
    Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Hume on Morality. [REVIEW]Michael Brady - 2001 - Hume Studies 27 (2):342-344.
    Hume on Morality will appeal, I assume, to two types of readers: those who are interested primarily in Hume, and seek to broaden their understanding of his philosophy by discovering what he has to say about morality; and those who are interested primarily in morality, and wish to deepen their knowledge of this by finding out what Hume thought about the subject. I doubt that either type will find James Baillie’s book entirely satisfactory, in spite of its undoubted merits; in (...)
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  29.  61
    The Appropriateness of Pride.Michael S. Brady - 2017 - In Joseph Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Pride. London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 13-30.
  30.  60
    Suffering in sport: why people willingly embrace negative emotional experiences.Michael S. Brady - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):115-128.
    ABSTRACTNearly everyone agrees that physical pain is bad. Indeed, if anything merits the status of a platitude in our everyday thinking about value, the idea that pain is bad surely does. Equally,...
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  31.  66
    Valuing, Desiring and Normative Priority.Michael S. Brady - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):231 - 242.
    Judgement internalism claims that our evaluative judgements will motivate us to act appropriately, at least in so far as we are rational. I examine how this claim should be understood, with particular focus on whether valuing enjoys a kind of 'normative priority' over desiring. I consider and reject views according to which valuing something provides one with a reason to be moved; this claim of normative priority and the readings of internalism it suggests are too strong. I also reject an (...)
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  32.  51
    Christine Tappolet, Emotions, Values, and Agency.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):150-154.
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  33.  32
    Suffering as experiential—A response to Jennifer Corns.Michael S. Brady - 2022 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 107 (1):24-30.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
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  34.  18
    Editor's Introduction.Michael S. Brady & Duncan Pritchard - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (3):330-330.
  35.  93
    Some Worries about Normative and Metaethical Sentimentalism.Michael S. Brady - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):144-153.
    In this response I raise a number of problems for Michael Slote's normative and metaethical sentimentalism. The first is that his agent–based account of rightness needs be qualified in order to be plausible; any such qualification, however, leaves Slote's normative ethics in tension with his metaethical views. The second is that an agent–based ethics of empathic caring will indeed struggle to capture our common–sense understanding of deontological constraints, and that appeal to the notion of causal immediacy will be of (...)
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  36.  80
    Can Epistemic Contextualism Avoid the Regress Problem?Michael S. Brady - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):317-328.
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  37.  22
    Ethics.Penelope Davies & Michael S. Brady - 2005 - Philosophical Books 46 (3):284-286.
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  38.  27
    Aesthetics, Nature and Religion: Ronald W. Hepburn and his Legacy, ed. Endre Szécsényi.Endre Szécsényi, Peter Cheyne, Cairns Craig, David E. Cooper, Emily Brady, Douglas Hedley, Mary Warnock, Guy Bennett-Hunter, Michael McGhee, James Kirwan, Isis Brook, Fran Speed, Yuriko Saito, James MacAllister, Arto Haapala, Alexander J. B. Hampton, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Sigurjón Baldur Hafsteinsson & Arnar Árnason - 2020 - Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press.
    On 18–19 May 2018, a symposium was held in the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the death of Ronald W. Hepburn (1927–2008). The speakers at this event discussed Hepburn’s oeuvre from several perspectives. For this book, the collection of the revised versions of their talks has been supplemented by the papers of other scholars who were unable to attend the symposium itself. Thus this volume contains contributions from (...)
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  39. Taking the Perceptual Analogy Seriously.Michael Milona - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (4):897-915.
    This paper offers a qualified defense of a historically popular view that I call sentimental perceptualism. At a first pass, sentimental perceptualism says that emotions play a role in grounding evaluative knowledge analogous to the role perceptions play in grounding empirical knowledge. Recently, András Szigeti and Michael Brady have independently developed an important set of objections to this theory. The objections have a common structure: they begin by conceding that emotions have some important epistemic role to play, but (...)
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  40.  25
    Michael S. Brady. Emotional Insight: The Epistemic Role of Emotional Experience. Reviewed by.Fabrice Bothereau - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (2):54-57.
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  41.  37
    Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volumes 2: Moral Responsibility, Structural Injustice, and Ethics.Michael S. Brownstein & Jennifer Mather Saul (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    At the University of Sheffield between 2011 and 2012, a leading group of philosophers, psychologists, and others gathered to explore the nature and significance of implicit bias. The two volumes of Implicit Bias and Philosophy emerge from these workshops. Each volume philosophically examines core areas of psychological research on implicit bias as well as the ramifications of implicit bias for core areas of philosophy. Volume II: Moral Responsibility, Structural Injustice, and Ethics is comprised of three parts. “Moral Responsibility for Implicit (...)
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  42.  42
    Kinship, lineage, and an evolutionary perspective on cooperative hunting groups in Indonesia.Michael S. Alvard - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (2):129-163.
    Work was conducted among traditional, subsistence whale hunters in Lamalera, Indonesia, in order to test if strict biological kinship or lineage membership is more important for explaining the organization of cooperative hunting parties ranging in size from 8 to 14 men. Crew identifications were collected for all 853 hunts that occurred between May 3 and August 5, 1999. Lineage identity and genetic relatedness were determined for a sample of 189 hunters. Results of matrix regression show that genetic kinship explains little (...)
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  43.  36
    Partner selection, coordination games, and group selection.Michael S. Alvard - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):80-81.
    The process of partner selection reflects ethnographic realities where cooperative rewards obtain that would otherwise be lost to loners. Baumard et al. neglect frequency-dependent processes exemplified by games of coordination. Such games can produce multiple equilibria that may or may not include fair outcomes. Additional, group-selection processes are required to produce the outcomes predicted by the models.
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  44.  18
    In Truth We Trust: Discourse, Phenomenology, and the Social Relations of Knowledge in an Environmental Dispute.Michael S. Carolan & Michael M. Bell - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (2):225-245.
    In this age of debate it is not news that what constitutes 'truth' is often at issue in environmental debates. But what is often missed is an insight that the speakers of Middle English understood a millennium ago: that truth comes from trust, which, is the central theoretical position of this paper. Our point is that truth depends essentially on social relations – relations that involve power and knowledge, to be sure, but also identity. Thus, challenges to what constitutes the (...)
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  45.  95
    Emotional Insight, by Michael S. Brady: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, pp. x + 204, £30.Hagit Benbaji - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):173-175.
  46.  7
    How Joseph De Maistre Read Plato's Laws.Michael S. Kochin - 2002 - Polis 19 (1-2):29-43.
    Maistre's Soirees de Saint-Petersbourg is modeled on Plato's Laws. Plato and Maistre both demand the political control of natural inquiry, and implement these controls through theodictic conversation. Maistre, following the lead of Plato's legislator, publishes an exemplary conversation about providence between a young man tempted by an atheistic Enlightenment and two older, wiser, and more learned men of affairs. Maistre defends providentialism from materialist interpretations of natural science even as Plato defended it from ancient materialism.
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  47.  32
    Conservation by native peoples.Michael S. Alvard - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (2):127-154.
    Native peoples have often been portrayed as natural conservationists, living a “balanced” existence with nature. It is argued that this perspective is a result of an imprecise operational definition of conservation. Conservation is defined here in contrast to the predictions of foraging theory, which assumes that foragers will behave to maximize their short-term harvesting rate. A behavior is deemed conservation when a short-term cost is paid by the resource harvester in exchange for long-term benefits in the form of sustainable harvests. (...)
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  48.  24
    Assessing the field of science and religion: Advice from the next generation.Michael S. Burdett - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):747-763.
    The field of science and religion is undergoing a transition today requiring assessment of its past movements and identifying its future trajectories by the next generation of science and religion scholars. This essay provides such assessment and advice. To focus efforts on the past, I turn to Ian Barbour's own stock taking of the field some forty years ago in an essay entitled “Science and Religion Today” before giving some personal comments where I argue that much of the field has (...)
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  49.  12
    Everyday Utopias: The Conceptual Life of Promising Spaces by Davina Cooper.Michael S. Cummings - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (3):649-655.
    Everyday Utopias explores a topic that is vital but is too often overlooked by utopian scholars. It is best read in tandem with its 2013 predecessor, Weak Messianism: Essays in Everyday Utopianism, by Michael Gardiner. In a nutshell, Cooper, like Gardiner, argues that although utopian visions may be born in the brains of utopian thinkers, progress toward utopia is what counts, and it must be rooted in present patterns and possibilities. Lest my qualms with the book’s execution overwhelm its (...)
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  50.  3
    Democratizing Knowledge: Sustainable and Conventional Agricultural Field Days as Divergent Democratic Forms.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (4):508-528.
    This article highlights that in our rush to call for the democratization of science and expertise we must not forget to speak to what type of democratization we are calling for. In short, not all participatory forms are the same. In developing this argument, I examine one such form that has yet to receive much attention from science and technology studies scholars: the agricultural field day. In examining the field day, we find that its orientation—that is, toward either the conventional (...)
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