6 found
Order:
  1. Strengthening Stakeholder–Company Relationships Through Mutually Beneficial Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives.C. B. Bhattacharya, Daniel Korschun & Sankar Sen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):257-272.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) continues to gain attention atop the corporate agenda and is by now an important component of the dialogue between companies and their stakeholders. Nevertheless, there is still little guidance as to how companies can implement CSR activity in order to maximize returns to CSR investment. Theorists have identified many company-favoring outcomes of CSR; yet there is a dearth of research on the psychological mechanisms that drive stakeholder responses to CSR activity. Borrowing from the literatures on meansend (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  2.  34
    Corporate Social Responsibility, Multi-faceted Job-Products, and Employee Outcomes.Shuili Du, C. B. Bhattacharya & Sankar Sen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):319-335.
    This paper examines how employees react to their organizations’ corporate social responsibility initiatives. Drawing upon research in internal marketing and psychological contract theories, we argue that employees have multi-faceted job needs and that CSR programs comprise an important means to fulfill developmental and ideological job needs. Based on cluster analysis, we identify three heterogeneous employee segments, Idealists, Enthusiasts, and Indifferents, who vary in their multi-faceted job needs and, consequently, their demand for organizational CSR. We further find that an organization’s CSR (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  3. Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues.C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  4.  4
    Corporate Purpose and Employee Sustainability Behaviors.C. B. Bhattacharya, Sankar Sen, Laura Marie Edinger-Schons & Michael Neureiter - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    This paper examines the effects of employees’ sense that they work for a purpose-driven company on their workplace sustainability behaviors. Conceptualizing corporate purpose as an overarching, relevant, shared ethical vision of why a company exists and where it needs to go, we argue that it is particularly suited for driving employee sustainability behaviors, which are more ethically complex than the types of employee ethical behaviors typically examined by prior research. Through four studies, two involving the actual employees of construction companies, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  4
    Marketing’s Consequences: Stakeholder Marketing and Supply Chain Corporate Social Responsibility Issues.N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility communication to counter the critique (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Women's movements and female board representation.Michael Neureiter & C. B. Bhattacharya - 2022 - Business and Society Review 127 (4):809-834.
    Scholars know relatively little about the potential impact of women's movements on gender diversity in the corporate world. We aim to fill this gap in the literature by providing the first empirical analysis of the relationship between women's movements and female representation on boards of directors. Drawing on political process theory, we argue that the strength of a women's movement is positively associated with its ability to increase the number of women on corporate boards. Moreover, we posit that the effect (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark